Special Issue "Breeding and Genetic Mechanism of Tea Plants"

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Genetics, Genomics and Biotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2022 | Viewed by 1119

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Kang Wei
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Key Laboratory of Tea Biology and Resources Utilization, Ministry of Agriculture, National Center for Tea Improvement, Tea Research Institute Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (TRICAAS), Hangzhou 310008, China
Interests: breeding; genetic mechanism; tea plant; abiotic stress
Dr. Jianhui Ye
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Tea Research Institute, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310013, China
Interests: tea polyphenols; tea volatiles; flavonoid biosynthesis; tea processing; tea chemistry; bioactivities; tea health benefits
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Liyuan Wang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Key Laboratory of Tea Biology and Resources Utilization, Ministry of Agriculture, National Center for Tea Improvement, Tea Research Institute Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (TRICAAS), Hangzhou 310008, China
Interests: breeding; gene cloning and expression; tea plant

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

At present, the breeding of new tea cultivars (e.g., albino cultivars, purple cultivars, and caffeine-free cultivars) is increasingly attractive and popular in the market. The changes of cultivars not only involve quality components such as flavonoids, amino acids, and caffeine, but also relate to plant appearance and responses to environmental factors. These changing phenotypes are closely associated with some significant genes, which are largely unknown. Exploring these genes and understanding their underlying mechanisms will improve tea cultivation management and breeding in the future. This Special Issue of Plants will highlight the exploration of new genes and their potential mechanisms, such as the changes of quality, stress response, fertility, leaf color and size. Papers related to tea propagation and new technologies in tea breeding are also welcome.

Prof. Dr. Kang Wei
Dr. Jianhui Ye
Prof. Dr. Liyuan Wang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • breeding
  • genetic mechanism
  • tea plant
  • phenotypic changes
  • secondary metabolites
  • stress

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Metabolomic Profiling in Combination with Data Association Analysis Provide Insights about Potential Metabolic Regulation Networks among Non-Volatile and Volatile Metabolites in Camellia sinensis cv Baijiguan
Plants 2022, 11(19), 2557; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11192557 - 28 Sep 2022
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Abstract
The non-volatile and volatile metabolites in tea confer the taste and odor characteristics of tea fusion, as well as shape the chemical base for tea quality. To date, it remains largely elusive whether there are metabolic crosstalks among non-volatile metabolites and volatile metabolites [...] Read more.
The non-volatile and volatile metabolites in tea confer the taste and odor characteristics of tea fusion, as well as shape the chemical base for tea quality. To date, it remains largely elusive whether there are metabolic crosstalks among non-volatile metabolites and volatile metabolites in the tea tree. Here, we generated an F1 half-sib population by using an albino cultivar of Camellia sinensis cv Baijiguan as the maternal parent, and then we quantified the non-volatile metabolites and volatile metabolites from individual half-sibs. We found that the EGC and EGCG contents of the albino half-sibs were significantly lower than those of the green half-sibs, while no significant differences were observed in total amino acids, caffeine, and other catechin types between these two groups. The phenylpropanoid pathway and the MEP pathway are the dominant routes for volatile synthesis in fresh tea leaves, followed by the MVA pathway and the fatty acid-derivative pathway. The total volatile contents derived from individual pathways showed large variations among half-sibs, there were no significant differences between the albino half-sibs and the green half-sibs. We performed a comprehensive correlation analysis, including correlations among non-volatile metabolites, between volatile synthesis pathways and non-volatile metabolites, and among the volatiles derived from same synthesis pathway, and we identified several significant positive or negative correlations. Our data suggest that the synthesis of non-volatile and volatile metabolites is potentially connected through shared intermediates; feedback inhibition, activation, or competition for common intermediates among branched pathways may co-exist; and cross-pathway activation or inhibition, as well as metabolome channeling, were also implicated. These multiple metabolic regulation modes could provide metabolic plasticity to direct carbon flux and lead to diverse metabolome among Baijiguan half-sibs. This study provides an essential knowledge base for rational tea germplasm improvements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Breeding and Genetic Mechanism of Tea Plants)
Article
Identification of a BAHD Acyltransferase Gene Involved in Plant Growth and Secondary Metabolism in Tea Plants
Plants 2022, 11(19), 2483; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11192483 - 22 Sep 2022
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Abstract
Plant acyl-CoA dominated acyltransferases (named BAHD) comprise a large appointed protein superfamily and play varied roles in plant secondary metabolism like synthesis of modified anthocyanins, flavonoids, volatile esters, etc. Tea (Camellia sinensis) is an important non-alcoholic medicinal and fragrancy plant synthesizing [...] Read more.
Plant acyl-CoA dominated acyltransferases (named BAHD) comprise a large appointed protein superfamily and play varied roles in plant secondary metabolism like synthesis of modified anthocyanins, flavonoids, volatile esters, etc. Tea (Camellia sinensis) is an important non-alcoholic medicinal and fragrancy plant synthesizing different secondary metabolites, including flavonoids. In the tea (C.A sinensis) cultivar Longjing 43 (LJ43), eight samples were performed into three groups for transcriptome analysis under three biological replications. Among the BAHD acyltransferase genes in tea cultivars, the expression of TEA031065 was highest in buds and young leaves following the RNA sequencing data, which was coincident with the tissue rich in catechins and other flavonoids. We then transformed this gene into wild-type Arabidopsis as an over-expression (OX) line 1 and line 2 in ½ MS media to verify its function. In the wild types (WT), the primary root length, number of secondary roots, and total root weight were significantly higher at 24%, 15%, and 53.92%, respectively, compared to the transgenic lines (OX1 and OX2). By contrast, the leaves displayed larger rosettes (21.58%), with higher total leaf weight (32.64%) in the transgenic lines than in the wild type (WT). This result is consistent with DCR mutant At5g23940 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, anthocyanin content in transgenic lines was also increased (21.65%) as compared to WT. According to the RNA sequencing data, a total of 22 growth regulatory genes and 31 structural genes with TFs (transcription factors) that are correlative with plant growth and anthocyanin accumulation were identified to be differentially expressed in the transgenic lines. It was found that some key genes involved in IAA (Auxin) and GA (Gibberellin) biosynthesis were downregulated in the transgenic lines, which might be correlated with the phenotype changes in roots. Moreover, the upregulation of plant growth regulation genes, such as UGT73C4 (zeatin), ARR15, GH3.5, ETR2, ERS2, APH4, and SAG113 might be responsible for massive leaf growth. In addition, transgenic lines shown high anthocyanin accumulation due to the upregulation of the (1) 3AT1 and (3) GSTF, particularly, GSTF12 genes in the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway. However, the TFs such as, CCoAMT, bHLH, WRKY, CYP, and other MYBs were also significantly upregulated in transgenic lines, which increased the content of anthocyanins in A. thaliana seedlings. In conclusion, a BAHD acyltransferase (TEA031065) was identified, which might play a vital role in tea growth and secondary metabolites regulation. This study increases our knowledge concerning the combined functionality of the tea BAHD acyltransferase gene (TEA031065). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Breeding and Genetic Mechanism of Tea Plants)
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Article
Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of Isopentenyl transferase Family Genes during Development and Resistance to Abiotic Stresses in Tea Plant (Camellia sinensis)
Plants 2022, 11(17), 2243; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11172243 - 29 Aug 2022
Viewed by 389
Abstract
The tea plant is an important economic crop and is widely cultivated. Isopentenyl transferase (IPT) is the first and rate-limiting enzyme of cytokinin (CK) signaling, which plays key roles in plant development and abiotic stress. However, the IPT gene family in tea plants [...] Read more.
The tea plant is an important economic crop and is widely cultivated. Isopentenyl transferase (IPT) is the first and rate-limiting enzyme of cytokinin (CK) signaling, which plays key roles in plant development and abiotic stress. However, the IPT gene family in tea plants has not been systematically investigated until now. The phylogenetic analyses, gene structures, and conserved domains were predicted here. The results showed that a total of 13 CsIPT members were identified from a tea plant genome database and phylogenetically classified into four groups. Furthermore, 10 CsIPT members belonged to plant ADP/ATP-IPT genes, and 3 CsIPTs were tRNA-IPT genes. There is a conserved putative ATP/GTP-binding site (P-loop motif) in all the CsIPT sequences. Based on publicly available transcriptome data as well as through RNA-seq and qRT-PCR analysis, the CsIPT genes which play key roles in the development of different tissues were identified, respectively. Furthermore, CsIPT6.2 may be involved in the response to different light treatments. CsIPT6.4 may play a key role during the dormancy and flush of the lateral buds. CsIPT5.1 may play important regulatory roles during the development of the lateral bud, leaf, and flower. CsIPT5.2 and CsIPT6.2 may both play key roles for increased resistance to cold-stress, whereas CsIPT3.2 may play a key role in improving resistance to high-temperature stress as well as drought-stress and rewatering. This study could provide a reference for further studies of CsIPT family’s functions and could contribute to tea molecular breeding. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Breeding and Genetic Mechanism of Tea Plants)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Caffeine transporters identified in tea plants (Camellia sinensis)
Authors: Yazhen Zhang
Affiliation: Tea Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, National Center for Tea Improvement, Key Laboratory of Tea Biology and Resource Utilization, Ministry of Agriculture, Hangzhou 310008, China
Abstract: Caffeine is a characteristic secondary metabolite in tea plants. It confers the unique flavor and excitation effect of tea as a popular beverage. Currently, the caffeine biosynthetic pathway has been generally established, but the mechanism of caffeine transport in tea plants remains unclear. Here, we identified eight purine permeases (PUPs) members in tea plants. The expression patterns of these CsPUPs in different tissues suggested their broad roles in caffeine metabolism. CsPUP1, CsPUP3.1 and CsPUP10.1 were selected for further investigation. Correlation analysis in tea leaves of eight strains and six cultivars showed that these three CsPUPs were significantly negatively correlated with caffeine content. Subcellular localization revealed that CsPUP1, CsPUP3.1 and CsPUP10.1 were located in plasma membrane, and may also widely distributed as vesicles in cells. Functional complementation assays in yeast showed that these CsPUPs could partly or completely rescue the caffeine transport function in fcy2 mutant. Transgenic yeast of CsPUP10.1 exhibited the strongest capacity of caffeine transport. Consistent phenotype and caffeine transport function were identified in the CsPUP10.1-over-expression arabidopsis lines. Taken together, these results suggested that CsPUP1, CsPUP3.1 and CsPUP10.1 function as caffeine transporters in tea plants. CsPUP10.1 may facilitate the process of caffeine decomposition by delivering it to other subcellular fractions for further utilization in mature leaves.

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