Special Issue "Photonic Jet: Science and Application"

A special issue of Photonics (ISSN 2304-6732). This special issue belongs to the section "New Applications Enabled by Photonics Technologies and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Zengbo Wang
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Guest Editor
School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering, Bangor University, Bangor, UK
Interests: micro/nano-optics; nanophotonics; plasmonics; metamaterials; imaging; laser processing; solar energy; optical manipulations.
Prof. Dr. Boris Luk’yanchuk
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Guest Editor
Physical Faculty, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia
Interests: nanophotonics; metamaterials; nonlinear optics; laser matter interaction
Prof. Dr. Igor V. Minin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Avenue, Tomsk 634050, Russia
Interests: bioinformatics and computational biology; antennas and propagation; photonics; optics; microwave engineering; electromagnetics; diffraction; computer security and IT forensics; waves; antennas; web science; microwave; computational electromagnetics; antenna; lenses; antenna arrays; electromagnetic waves
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Photonic jet is a subwavelength focusing effect arising from electromagnetic waves interaction with low-loss dielectric objects, including micro and nano spheres, fiber, cubes and even biological cells and spider silks. First discovered in 2000, photonic jet has undergone significant and continued development for applications in super-resolution imaging, microscopy, fabrication, sensing, trapping, sorting, manipulation and signal amplification (e.g, Raman, photoluminescence), among others.

This special issue focuses on the recent advances on photonic jet developments, including both science and applications. Topics will include, but are not limited to:

  • Label-free microscopy and imaging by photonic jet
  • Sensing, trapping, manipulation and other applications of photonic jet
  • Enhanced Raman scattering and photoluminescence by photonic jet
  • High-index dielectric photonic jet lens
  • Solid Immersion photonic jet lens
  • Resonant and super-oscillation effects in photonic jet
  • Metamaterial photonic jet
  • Nonlinear photonic jet
  • Integrated photonic jet devices
  • Acoustic and Terahertz jet
  • Photonic hook (curved photonic jet)

Dr. Zengbo Wang
Prof. Dr. Boris Luk’yanchuk
Prof. Dr. Igor V. Minin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Photonics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • photonic jet
  • nanojet
  • dielectric particle
  • microsphere
  • super-resolution

Published Papers (9 papers)

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Research

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Communication
Super-Resolution Imaging with Patchy Microspheres
Photonics 2021, 8(11), 513; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics8110513 - 15 Nov 2021
Viewed by 360
Abstract
The diffraction limit is a fundamental barrier in optical microscopy, which restricts the smallest resolvable feature size of a microscopic system. Microsphere-based microscopy has proven to be a promising tool for challenging the diffraction limit. Nevertheless, the microspheres have a low imaging contrast [...] Read more.
The diffraction limit is a fundamental barrier in optical microscopy, which restricts the smallest resolvable feature size of a microscopic system. Microsphere-based microscopy has proven to be a promising tool for challenging the diffraction limit. Nevertheless, the microspheres have a low imaging contrast in air, which hinders the application of this technique. In this work, we demonstrate that this challenge can be effectively overcome by using partially Ag-plated microspheres. The deposited Ag film acts as an aperture stop that blocks a portion of the incident beam, forming a photonic hook and an oblique near-field illumination. Such a photonic hook significantly enhanced the imaging contrast of the system, as experimentally verified by imaging the Blu-ray disc surface and colloidal particle arrays. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photonic Jet: Science and Application)
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Communication
Generation of Photonic Hooks from Patchy Microcylinders
Photonics 2021, 8(11), 466; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics8110466 - 22 Oct 2021
Viewed by 307
Abstract
The photonic hook (PH) is a new type of curved light beam, which has promising applications in various fields such as nanoparticle manipulation, super-resolution imaging, and so forth. Herein, we proposed a new approach of utilizing patchy microcylinders for the generation of PHs. [...] Read more.
The photonic hook (PH) is a new type of curved light beam, which has promising applications in various fields such as nanoparticle manipulation, super-resolution imaging, and so forth. Herein, we proposed a new approach of utilizing patchy microcylinders for the generation of PHs. Numerical simulation based on the finite-difference time-domain method was used to investigate the field distribution characteristics of the PHs. By rotating the patchy microcylinder, PHs with different curvatures can be effectively generated, and the PH with a bending angle of 28.4 and a full-width-half-maximum of 0.36 λ can be obtained from 1 μm-diameter patchy microcylinders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photonic Jet: Science and Application)
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Article
Photonic Jet-Shaped Optical Fiber Tips versus Lensed Fibers
Photonics 2021, 8(9), 373; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics8090373 - 07 Sep 2021
Viewed by 445
Abstract
Shaped optical fiber tips have recently attracted a lot of interest for photonic jet light focusing due to their easy manipulation to scan a sample. However, lensed optical fibers are not new. This study analyzes how fiber tip parameters can be used to [...] Read more.
Shaped optical fiber tips have recently attracted a lot of interest for photonic jet light focusing due to their easy manipulation to scan a sample. However, lensed optical fibers are not new. This study analyzes how fiber tip parameters can be used to control focusing properties. Our study shows that the configurations to generate a photonic jet (PJ) can clearly be distinguished from more classical-lensed fibers focusing. PJ is a highly concentrated, propagative light beam, with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) that can be lower than the diffraction limit. According to the simulations, the PJs are obtained when light is coupled in the guide fundamental mode and when the base diameter of the microlens is close to the core diameter. For single mode fibers or fibers with a low number of modes, long tips with a relatively sharp shape achieve PJ with smaller widths. On the contrary, when the base diameter of the microlens is larger than the fiber core, the focus point tends to move away from the external surface of the fiber and has a larger width. In other words, the optical system (fiber/microlens) behaves in this case like a classical-lensed fiber with a larger focus spot size. The results of this study can be used as guidelines for the tailored fabrication of shaped optical fiber tips according to the targeted application. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photonic Jet: Science and Application)
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Communication
Photonic Nanojet Modulation Achieved by a Spider-Silk-Based Metal–Dielectric Dome Microlens
Photonics 2021, 8(8), 334; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics8080334 - 14 Aug 2021
Viewed by 715
Abstract
The photonic nanojet is a non-resonance focusing phenomenon with high intensity and narrow spot that can serve as a powerful biosensor for in vivo detection of red blood cells, micro-organisms, and tumor cells in blood. In this study, we first demonstrated photonic nanojet [...] Read more.
The photonic nanojet is a non-resonance focusing phenomenon with high intensity and narrow spot that can serve as a powerful biosensor for in vivo detection of red blood cells, micro-organisms, and tumor cells in blood. In this study, we first demonstrated photonic nanojet modulation by utilizing a spider-silk-based metal–dielectric dome microlens. A cellar spider was employed in extracting the silk fiber, which possesses a liquid-collecting ability to form a dielectric dome microlens. The metal casing on the surface of the dielectric dome was coated by using a glancing angle deposition technique. Due to the nature of surface plasmon polaritons, the characteristics of photonic nanojets are strongly modulated by different metal casings. Numerical and experimental results showed that the intensity of the photonic nanojet was increased by a factor of three for the gold-coated dome microlens due to surface plasmon resonance. The spider-silk-based metal-dielectric dome microlens could be used to scan a biological target for large-area imaging with a conventional optical microscope. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photonic Jet: Science and Application)
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Article
Super-Resolution Imaging by Dielectric Superlenses: TiO2 Metamaterial Superlens versus BaTiO3 Superlens
Photonics 2021, 8(6), 222; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics8060222 - 15 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 696
Abstract
All-dielectric superlens made from micro and nano particles has emerged as a simple yet effective solution to label-free, super-resolution imaging. High-index BaTiO3 Glass (BTG) microspheres are among the most widely used dielectric superlenses today but could potentially be replaced by a new [...] Read more.
All-dielectric superlens made from micro and nano particles has emerged as a simple yet effective solution to label-free, super-resolution imaging. High-index BaTiO3 Glass (BTG) microspheres are among the most widely used dielectric superlenses today but could potentially be replaced by a new class of TiO2 metamaterial (meta-TiO2) superlens made of TiO2 nanoparticles. In this work, we designed and fabricated TiO2 metamaterial superlens in full-sphere shape for the first time, which resembles BTG microsphere in terms of the physical shape, size, and effective refractive index. Super-resolution imaging performances were compared using the same sample, lighting, and imaging settings. The results show that TiO2 meta-superlens performs consistently better over BTG superlens in terms of imaging contrast, clarity, field of view, and resolution, which was further supported by theoretical simulation. This opens new possibilities in developing more powerful, robust, and reliable super-resolution lens and imaging systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photonic Jet: Science and Application)
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Communication
Direct Writing of Silicon Oxide Nanopatterns Using Photonic Nanojets
Photonics 2021, 8(5), 152; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics8050152 - 03 May 2021
Viewed by 779
Abstract
The ability to create controllable patterns of micro- and nanostructures on the surface of bulk silicon has widespread application potential. In particular, the direct writing of silicon oxide patterns on silicon via femtosecond laser-induced silicon amorphization has attracted considerable attention owing to its [...] Read more.
The ability to create controllable patterns of micro- and nanostructures on the surface of bulk silicon has widespread application potential. In particular, the direct writing of silicon oxide patterns on silicon via femtosecond laser-induced silicon amorphization has attracted considerable attention owing to its simplicity and high efficiency. However, the direct writing of nanoscale resolution is challenging due to the optical diffraction effect. In this study, we propose a highly efficient, one-step method for preparing silicon oxide nanopatterns on silicon. The proposed method combines femtosecond laser-induced silicon amorphization with a subwavelength-scale beam waist of photonic nanojets. We demonstrate the direct writing of arbitrary nanopatterns via contactless scanning, achieving patterns with a minimum feature size of 310 nm and a height of 120 nm. The proposed method shows potential for the fabrication of multifunctional surfaces, silicon-based chips, and silicon photonics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photonic Jet: Science and Application)
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Communication
Near- to Far-Field Coupling of Evanescent Waves by Glass Microspheres
Photonics 2021, 8(3), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics8030073 - 06 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 711
Abstract
Through rigorous electromagnetic simulations, the natural coupling of high-spatial-frequency evanescent waves from the near field to the far field by dielectric microspheres is studied in air. The generation of whispering gallery modes inside the microspheres is shown independently of any resonance. In addition, [...] Read more.
Through rigorous electromagnetic simulations, the natural coupling of high-spatial-frequency evanescent waves from the near field to the far field by dielectric microspheres is studied in air. The generation of whispering gallery modes inside the microspheres is shown independently of any resonance. In addition, the conversion mechanism of these evanescent waves into propagating waves is analysed. This latter point leads to key information that allows a better physical understanding of the super-resolution phenomenon in microsphere-assisted microscopy where sub-diffraction-limit revolving power is achieved. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photonic Jet: Science and Application)
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Communication
A Closer Look at Photonic Nanojets in Reflection Mode: Control of Standing Wave Modulation
Photonics 2021, 8(2), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics8020054 - 17 Feb 2021
Viewed by 962
Abstract
The photonic nanojet phenomenon is commonly used both to increase the resolution of optical microscopes and to trap nanoparticles. However, such photonic nanojets are not applicable to an entire class of objects. Here we present a new type of photonic nanojet in reflection [...] Read more.
The photonic nanojet phenomenon is commonly used both to increase the resolution of optical microscopes and to trap nanoparticles. However, such photonic nanojets are not applicable to an entire class of objects. Here we present a new type of photonic nanojet in reflection mode with the possibility to control the modulation of the photonic nanojet by a standing wave. In contrast to the known kinds of reflective photonic nanojets, the reported one occurs when the aluminum oxide hemisphere is located at a certain distance from the substrate. Under illumination, the hemisphere generates a primary photonic nanojet directed to the substrate. After reflection, the primary nanojet acts as an illumination source for the hemisphere, leading to the formation of a new reflective photonic nanojet. We show that the distance between the hemisphere and substrate affects the phase of both incident and reflected radiation, and due to constructive interference, the modulation of the reflective photonic nanojet by a standing wave can be significantly reduced. The results obtained contribute to the understanding of the processes of photonic nanojet formation in reflection mode and open new pathways for designing functional optical devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photonic Jet: Science and Application)
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Review

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Review
Optical Trapping, Sensing, and Imaging by Photonic Nanojets
Photonics 2021, 8(10), 434; https://doi.org/10.3390/photonics8100434 - 11 Oct 2021
Viewed by 401
Abstract
The optical trapping, sensing, and imaging of nanostructures and biological samples are research hotspots in the fields of biomedicine and nanophotonics. However, because of the diffraction limit of light, traditional optical tweezers and microscopy are difficult to use to trap and observe objects [...] Read more.
The optical trapping, sensing, and imaging of nanostructures and biological samples are research hotspots in the fields of biomedicine and nanophotonics. However, because of the diffraction limit of light, traditional optical tweezers and microscopy are difficult to use to trap and observe objects smaller than 200 nm. Near-field scanning probes, metamaterial superlenses, and photonic crystals have been designed to overcome the diffraction limit, and thus are used for nanoscale optical trapping, sensing, and imaging. Additionally, photonic nanojets that are simply generated by dielectric microspheres can break the diffraction limit and enhance optical forces, detection signals, and imaging resolution. In this review, we summarize the current types of microsphere lenses, as well as their principles and applications in nano-optical trapping, signal enhancement, and super-resolution imaging, with particular attention paid to research progress in photonic nanojets for the trapping, sensing, and imaging of biological cells and tissues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photonic Jet: Science and Application)
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