Special Issue "COVID-19: What Happens in Pediatric Research in the Era of Pandemic"

A special issue of Pediatric Reports (ISSN 2036-7503).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Maurizio Aricò
Website
Guest Editor
Giovanni XXIII Children Hospital, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Consorziale Policlinico, Bari, Italy
Interests: antineoplastic combined chemotherapy protocols; precursor cell lymphoblastic leukemia–lymphoma; DNA mutational analysis; Down syndrome; survival analysis; combined modality therapy; histiocytosis; Langerhans cell; cellular cytotoxicity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The COVID-19 pandemic is having a severe impact on healthcare systems around the world, with most hospitals being forced to rewrite their rules and change their structure to meet the new challenges presented. In fact, our entire social environment has been thoroughly modified and re-thought.

While this has had devastating consequences in many ways, leading both to loss of life and extraordinary disruptions, it has also served as a form of “experimentum naturae”, forcing us into situations we never could have imagined having to live in. A big challenge for clinicians and researchers now is to find ways to make the most of, and potentially profit from, this unexpected and new context.

Clinical observation, epidemiology, and basic research, including but not limited to the field of infectious diseases, may represent a huge mine for lessons learned.

We would like to invite you to share with our medical and pediatric community your findings and interpretations stemming from the world that COVID-19 has plunged us into.

Papers focused on how pediatric practice has been changed by the pandemic, what we have “discovered” may be further changed, what we realize we may consider no more a “must” and comparisons thereof are invited, as well as papers on how technology has helped us to deal with patients with rare diseases or complex care needs. Extraordinary times lead to extraordinary measures, and bright minds discover new ways to achieve what can no longer be achieved through established means. It is our pleasure to invite you to share all your new discoveries of “untrodden paths” in the field of healthcare with our readers.

Dr. Maurizio Aricò
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pediatric Reports is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Autism, Therapy and COVID-19
Pediatr. Rep. 2021, 13(1), 35-44; https://doi.org/10.3390/pediatric13010005 - 05 Jan 2021
Viewed by 885
Abstract
While numerous treatments for ASD are available, intervention based on the principles and procedures of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) has garnered substantial scientific support. In this study we evaluated the effects of the lockdown during the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak, followed by quarantine provisions [...] Read more.
While numerous treatments for ASD are available, intervention based on the principles and procedures of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) has garnered substantial scientific support. In this study we evaluated the effects of the lockdown during the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak, followed by quarantine provisions and during the three months after the resumption of activities. The study was conducted on a group of children taking part on a ABA-based intervention funded by the Local Health Authority (ASL) of the province of Caserta. In this study we considered a sample of 88 children who had been diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder, aged between 18 and 30 months. The following inclusion criteria were observed: age at the time of diagnosis less than 30 months, absence of other neurological, genetic, or sensorineural pathologies, and severity level 1 measured by symptoms evaluation based on the ADOS 2 module T (used for diagnosis). During the lockdown children experienced improvements in communication, socialization, and personal autonomy. During the three months after the ABA treatment, the acquired skills were maintained but no significant improvement was demonstrated. In this study, we describe how parent training was significant in avoiding delays in the generalization of socially significant behaviors, following the drastic interruption of the treatment in this group of children. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue COVID-19: What Happens in Pediatric Research in the Era of Pandemic)
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Open AccessArticle
The Challenges of a Children’s Hospital during the COVID-19 Pandemic: The Pediatric Surgeon’s Point of View
Pediatr. Rep. 2020, 12(3), 114-123; https://doi.org/10.3390/pediatric12030025 - 12 Nov 2020
Viewed by 454
Abstract
During the coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) emergency, in the pediatric surgical setting, it has been essential to avoid and contain infections as well as to protect both the patients and the surgical team. During this emergency, procedures and workflow were adapted to [...] Read more.
During the coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) emergency, in the pediatric surgical setting, it has been essential to avoid and contain infections as well as to protect both the patients and the surgical team. During this emergency, procedures and workflow were adapted to provide the safest possible environment for both the surgical team and the patients. Pediatric surgical activities were reorganized during the COVID-19 pandemic at the “Vittore Buzzi” Children’s Hospital, which is a pediatric/maternal hospital located in Milan (Lombardy Region), Italy. Resources were optimized in order to maintain high levels of care and quality of assistance. During the COVID-19 emergency, the pediatric surgical department at the “Vittore Buzzi” Children’s Hospital became an acute care surgical service. For the reorganization of surgical activities, institutional protocols were adapted in order to preserve the pediatric-specific characteristics of our service; five crucial points were specifically addressed. The pediatric surgical procedures carried out during the initial two months of the Italian lockdown are also reported. Continuity of care was maintained for children affected by severe diseases, such as tumors and neurosurgical conditions, whose treatment could not be deferred. Telemedicine and telecommunication were adopted as quick-support modalities for pre- and post-operative care. This reorganization allowed us to preserve the “pediatric specificity” and all care-related procedures offered at this high-quality/high-volume surgical care referral center. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue COVID-19: What Happens in Pediatric Research in the Era of Pandemic)

Review

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Open AccessReview
Noli Timere: The Role of Reassuring Adults in Dealing with COVID-19 Anxiety in Pediatric Age
Pediatr. Rep. 2021, 13(1), 15-30; https://doi.org/10.3390/pediatric13010003 - 01 Jan 2021
Viewed by 503
Abstract
Since the earliest stages of the Corona Virus Disease-19 (COVID-19) spread, the elderly has been identified as the most vulnerable and health authorities have rightly focused on that population. Minor attention was paid to pediatric populations and their emotional reactions. Actually, children and [...] Read more.
Since the earliest stages of the Corona Virus Disease-19 (COVID-19) spread, the elderly has been identified as the most vulnerable and health authorities have rightly focused on that population. Minor attention was paid to pediatric populations and their emotional reactions. Actually, children and adolescents faced severe anxiety, fear and stress conditions. An efficient management of the pandemic, therefore, must take into account the pediatric population which cannot be neglected as a minor matter compared to the elderly, the economy and health care. Since the lockdown time is over, children and adolescents must recover sociality, return to living in the open air, rediscover playing, free time, aiming for the beauty of their everyday life. In order to mitigate the long-term impact of COVID-19, the key response is the reassuring presence of the adult as ‘a secure base’. The current study aimed to collect an overview of the recent references that report evidence on the role of adults in containing pandemic anxiety COVID-19 in pediatric populations, suggesting the need to ensure a reassuring presence of the adult, an effective child-parent communication, a child-friendly day and a long-lasting shared time with parents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue COVID-19: What Happens in Pediatric Research in the Era of Pandemic)
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Other

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Open AccessCase Report
COVID-19 in Pediatric Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis
Pediatr. Rep. 2021, 13(1), 31-34; https://doi.org/10.3390/pediatric13010004 - 04 Jan 2021
Viewed by 396
Abstract
The confirmed cases with COVID-19 in children account for just 1% of the overall confirmed cases. Severe COVID-19 in children is rare. Case Presentation: Our patient was 16 years old with a severe case of COVID-19 and did not survive due to the [...] Read more.
The confirmed cases with COVID-19 in children account for just 1% of the overall confirmed cases. Severe COVID-19 in children is rare. Case Presentation: Our patient was 16 years old with a severe case of COVID-19 and did not survive due to the presence of Granulomatosis with polyangiitis and being treated with immunosuppressive drugs. We used lopinavir, ritonavir, hydroxy chloroquine, intravenous immunoglobulin and continuous veno-venous hemodialysis for treatment. Conclusion: In this patient, an underlying disease and delayed admission to the hospital were two factors complicating his condition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue COVID-19: What Happens in Pediatric Research in the Era of Pandemic)
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