Special Issue "Advances in Human Pathogens Infections"

A special issue of Pathogens (ISSN 2076-0817).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Anna Honko
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories, Department of Microbiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118, USA
Interests: filoviruses; arenaviruses; emerging viruses; aerobiology; animal model development; medical countermeasures development; vaccine development; host-pathogen interactions; virus stock production and standardization/characterization
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A human pathogen is a pathogen (microbe or microorganism such as a virus, bacterium, prion, fungus, or parasites, etc.) that causes disease in humans. The human physiological defense against common pathogens is mainly the responsibility of the immune system, with help from some of the body's normal flora and fauna. However, if the immune system or "good" microbiota are damaged in any way, pathogenic bacteria that were being held at bay can proliferate and cause harm to the host. Such cases are called opportunistic infections. Some pathogens (such as the bacterium Yersinia pestis, malaria protozoa, and SARS-CoV-2) have been responsible for a massive number of casualties, and have had numerous effects on afflicted groups. The current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 is a global public health problem. Today, while many medical advances have been made to safeguard against infection by pathogens, through the use of vaccination, antibiotics, and fungicide, pathogens continue to threaten human life.

The current Special Issue titled "Advances in Human Pathogens Infections" invites research articles, reviews, editorials, and commentaries on contemporary and hot topics in the field of human pathogens. The aim is to improve our understanding of human pathogens and make a positive contribution to the protection of human life and health.

Dr. Anna Honko
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pathogens is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • human pathogens
  • host–pathogen interactions
  • pathogenesis
  • diagnostics
  • therapy
  • immune
  • epidemiology
  • control
  • prevention
  • vaccine

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Arthrobacter woluwensis Bacteremia: A Clinical and Genomic Report
Pathogens 2021, 10(4), 443; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10040443 - 08 Apr 2021
Viewed by 229
Abstract
Arthrobacter woluwensis is a Gram-positive, aerobic Actinobacteria that is widely distributed in the environment worldwide. Little is known about A. woluwensis infection and it is commonly mis-identified by culturing with commercial kits. To date, only six cases of bacteremia caused by A. woluwensis [...] Read more.
Arthrobacter woluwensis is a Gram-positive, aerobic Actinobacteria that is widely distributed in the environment worldwide. Little is known about A. woluwensis infection and it is commonly mis-identified by culturing with commercial kits. To date, only six cases of bacteremia caused by A. woluwensis have been reported in the literature. Herein, we report a case of Arthrobacter woluwensis bacteremia in an immunocompromised host. In this case report, the results of antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that this clinical isolate of A. woluwensis is sensitive to vancomycin, teicoplanin, but resistant to penicillin, cephalosporin and ciprofloxacin. Additionally, whole genome sequencing analysis identified common subunits of the urease system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Human Pathogens Infections)
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Open AccessArticle
Characterization of Ocular Surface Microbial Profiles Revealed Discrepancies between Conjunctival and Corneal Microbiota
Pathogens 2021, 10(4), 405; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10040405 - 30 Mar 2021
Viewed by 362
Abstract
The ocular microbiome composition has only been partially characterized. Here, we used RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) data to assess microbial diversity in human corneal tissue. Additionally, conjunctival swab samples were examined to characterize ocular surface microbiota. Short RNA-Seq reads, obtained from a previous transcriptome study [...] Read more.
The ocular microbiome composition has only been partially characterized. Here, we used RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq) data to assess microbial diversity in human corneal tissue. Additionally, conjunctival swab samples were examined to characterize ocular surface microbiota. Short RNA-Seq reads, obtained from a previous transcriptome study of 50 corneal tissues, were mapped to the human reference genome GRCh38 to remove sequences of human origin. The unmapped reads were then used for taxonomic classification by comparing them with known bacterial, archaeal, and viral sequences from public databases. The components of microbial communities were identified and characterized using both conventional microbiology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques in 36 conjunctival swabs. The majority of ocular samples examined by conventional and molecular techniques showed very similar microbial taxonomic profiles, with most of the microorganisms being classified into Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria phyla. Only 50% of conjunctival samples exhibited bacterial growth. The PCR detection provided a broader overview of positive results for conjunctival materials. The RNA-Seq assessment revealed significant variability of the corneal microbial communities, including fastidious bacteria and viruses. The use of the combined techniques allowed for a comprehensive characterization of the eye microbiome’s elements, especially in aspects of microbiota diversity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Human Pathogens Infections)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
World Health Organization High Priority Pathogens: Ophthalmic Disease Findings and Vision Health Perspectives
Pathogens 2021, 10(4), 442; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10040442 - 08 Apr 2021
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Abstract
Recent Ebola epidemics, the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, and emerging infectious disease threats have highlighted the importance of global infectious diseases and responses to public health emergencies. Ophthalmologists are essential health care workers who provide urgent and emergent vision care services during outbreaks and [...] Read more.
Recent Ebola epidemics, the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, and emerging infectious disease threats have highlighted the importance of global infectious diseases and responses to public health emergencies. Ophthalmologists are essential health care workers who provide urgent and emergent vision care services during outbreaks and address the ocular consequences of epidemic and pandemic infectious diseases. In 2017, the World Health Organization (WHO) identified high priority pathogens likely to cause a future epidemic with the goal of guiding research and development to improve diagnostic tests, vaccines, and medicines. These measures were necessary to better inform and respond to public health emergencies. Given the ocular complications associated with emerging infectious diseases, there is a need to recognize the ophthalmic sequelae for future vision health preparedness for potential future outbreaks. The WHO High Priority pathogens list provides a roadmap for ophthalmologists and subspecialty providers that will guide strategic areas of research for clinical care and preparedness for future pandemic threats. This review summarizes these key viral pathogens, summarizes major systemic disease findings, and delineates relevant ocular complications of the WHO High Priority pathogens list, including Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, Filovirus diseases (Ebola virus disease and Marburg hemorrhagic fever), human Coronaviruses, Lassa Fever, Nipah virus infection, Zika, and Rift Valley fever. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Human Pathogens Infections)
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