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World Health Organization High Priority Pathogens: Ophthalmic Disease Findings and Vision Health Perspectives

1
Emory Eye Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
2
Department of Ophthalmology, Truhlsen Eye Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68105, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Contribution, S.K. and C.L.A. contributed equally and share first authorship.
Academic Editor: Anna Honko
Pathogens 2021, 10(4), 442; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10040442
Received: 4 March 2021 / Revised: 25 March 2021 / Accepted: 3 April 2021 / Published: 8 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Human Pathogens Infections)
Recent Ebola epidemics, the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, and emerging infectious disease threats have highlighted the importance of global infectious diseases and responses to public health emergencies. Ophthalmologists are essential health care workers who provide urgent and emergent vision care services during outbreaks and address the ocular consequences of epidemic and pandemic infectious diseases. In 2017, the World Health Organization (WHO) identified high priority pathogens likely to cause a future epidemic with the goal of guiding research and development to improve diagnostic tests, vaccines, and medicines. These measures were necessary to better inform and respond to public health emergencies. Given the ocular complications associated with emerging infectious diseases, there is a need to recognize the ophthalmic sequelae for future vision health preparedness for potential future outbreaks. The WHO High Priority pathogens list provides a roadmap for ophthalmologists and subspecialty providers that will guide strategic areas of research for clinical care and preparedness for future pandemic threats. This review summarizes these key viral pathogens, summarizes major systemic disease findings, and delineates relevant ocular complications of the WHO High Priority pathogens list, including Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, Filovirus diseases (Ebola virus disease and Marburg hemorrhagic fever), human Coronaviruses, Lassa Fever, Nipah virus infection, Zika, and Rift Valley fever. View Full-Text
Keywords: emerging infectious disease; ophthalmic manifestations; ophthalmic sequalae; retinitis; uveitis; viral persistence; ebola virus disease; ebola survivor; marburg virus disease; anterior uveitis; posterior uveitis; tear film transmission; COVID-19 emerging infectious disease; ophthalmic manifestations; ophthalmic sequalae; retinitis; uveitis; viral persistence; ebola virus disease; ebola survivor; marburg virus disease; anterior uveitis; posterior uveitis; tear film transmission; COVID-19
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kuthya, S.; Anthony, C.L.; Fashina, T.; Yeh, S.; Shantha, J.G. World Health Organization High Priority Pathogens: Ophthalmic Disease Findings and Vision Health Perspectives. Pathogens 2021, 10, 442. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10040442

AMA Style

Kuthya S, Anthony CL, Fashina T, Yeh S, Shantha JG. World Health Organization High Priority Pathogens: Ophthalmic Disease Findings and Vision Health Perspectives. Pathogens. 2021; 10(4):442. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10040442

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kuthya, Sanjana; Anthony, Casey L.; Fashina, Tolulope; Yeh, Steven; Shantha, Jessica G. 2021. "World Health Organization High Priority Pathogens: Ophthalmic Disease Findings and Vision Health Perspectives" Pathogens 10, no. 4: 442. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10040442

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