Special Issue "Global Elimination of Viral Hepatitis"

A special issue of Pathogens (ISSN 2076-0817). This special issue belongs to the section "Human Pathogens".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. MahmoudReza Pourkarim
Website
Guest Editor
Rega Institute for Medical Research, Leuven, Belgium
Interests: Viral hepatitis
Dr. Heidar Sharafi
Website
Co-Guest Editor
Middle East Liver Diseases (MELD) Center, Tehran, Iran
Interests: Hepatology; Viral Hepatitis; Clinical Laboratory Science; Fatty Liver; Hepatitis B; Liver Diseases; Molecular Diagnostics; Chronic Hepatitis C; Chronic Hepatitis B; Hepatitis

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Five unrelated hepatotropic viruses are the cause of viral hepatitis, which is a major concern of global public health. Hepatitis A virus (HAV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D (delta) virus (HDV), and hepatitis E viruses (HEV) are different causes for acute and chronic types of hepatitis that can lead to life-threatening complications such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Different strains of these viruses have distinct geographical distributions, with almost 600 million carriers worldwide. The annual mortality rate of viral hepatitis is around 1.5 million individuals, of which the majority are related to HBV and HCV infections. Relying on advanced diagnostic techniques and strategies for blood screening together with the availability of efficient vaccine and effective antiviral treatment for HBV and HCV, respectively, WHO has implemented a global elimination program in 2016 to end it in 2030. The success of this program depends on the improvement of our insight into the epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prophylactic countermeasures of viral hepatitis. An update of these crucial topics could be achieved in a Special Issue of Pathogens.

In the form of a Special Issue, we aim to provide a collection of the most recent top research articles, comprehensive reviews, as well as short communications in line with viral hepatitis. Through this Special Issue, we are pinpointing the current situation and future perspectives of the viral hepatitis elimination program.

I am looking forward to your valuable involvement in this interesting Issue.

Dr. MahmoudReza Pourkarim
Dr. Heidar Sharafi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pathogens is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Viral hepatitis
  • Elimination
  • Epidemiology
  • Therapy
  • Diagnostic
  • Virology
  • Clinical outcome

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Evidence of the Extrahepatic Replication of Hepatitis E Virus in Human Endometrial Stromal Cells
Pathogens 2020, 9(4), 295; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9040295 - 17 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the most common cause of acute viral hepatitis worldwide. The tropism of HEV is not restricted to the liver, and the virus replicates in other organs. Not all the extrahepatic targets for HEV are identified. Herein, we found [...] Read more.
Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the most common cause of acute viral hepatitis worldwide. The tropism of HEV is not restricted to the liver, and the virus replicates in other organs. Not all the extrahepatic targets for HEV are identified. Herein, we found that non-decidualized primary human endometrial stromal cells (PHESCs), which are precursors for the decidua and placenta, are susceptible to HEV infection. PHESCs, isolated from healthy non-pregnant women (n = 5), were challenged with stool-derived HEV-1 and HEV-3. HEV RNA was measured by qPCR, and HEV capsid protein was assessed by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence (IF), and ELISA. HEV infection was successfully established in PHESCs. Intracellular and extracellular HEV RNA loads were increased over time, indicating efficient replication in vitro. In addition, HEV capsid protein was detected intracellularly in the HEV-infected PHESCs and accumulated extracellularly over time, confirming the viral assembly and release from the infected cells. HEV-1 replicated more efficiently in PHESCs than HEV-3 and induced more inflammatory responses. Ribavirin (RBV) treatment abolished the replication of HEV in PHESCs. In conclusion, PHESCs are permissive to HEV infection and these cells could be an endogenous source of HEV infection during pregnancy and mediate HEV vertical transmission. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Global Elimination of Viral Hepatitis)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Global Prevalence of HBsAg and HIV and HCV Antibodies among People Who Inject Drugs and Female Sex Workers
Pathogens 2020, 9(6), 432; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9060432 - 31 May 2020
Abstract
The main objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) and their co-infections among people who inject drugs (PWID) and female sex workers (FSWs). Data sources [...] Read more.
The main objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) and their co-infections among people who inject drugs (PWID) and female sex workers (FSWs). Data sources were searched from January 2008 to October 2018 in different databases. Data were analyzed in Stata 16 software using the Metaprop command. The results showed that the prevalence of HIV, HCV and HBV among PWID was 15%, 60% and 6%, respectively. The prevalence of HIV, HCV and HBV among FSWs was 5%, 1% and 3%, respectively. The prevalence of HIV/HCV, HIV/HBV, HCV/HBV and HIV/HCV/HBV co-infections among PWID was 13%, 2%, 3% and 2%, respectively. The prevalence of HIV/HCV and HIV/HBV co-infections among FSWs was 3% and 1%, respectively. The results show that the prevalence of HCV and HIV infections in PWID and the prevalence of HIV in FSWs is higher than their prevalence in the general population. Interventions for the prevention of HIV and HCV in PWID appear to be poor, and may not be sufficient to effectively prevent HIV and HCV transmission. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Global Elimination of Viral Hepatitis)
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