Special Issue "Animal Models of Infectious Disease"

A special issue of Pathogens (ISSN 2076-0817).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 July 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Jason E. Comer
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, USA
Interests: Filoviruses; Ebola; Marburg; animal models; medical countermeasure development

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Animal models of infectious disease have been instrumental in the advancement of human and veterinary medicine and will continue to be in the future. These models have been used in the development of new antibiotics and antivirals as well as in vaccines for new emerging diseases. With the advent of the FDA’s Animal Rule, appropriate animal models can be used as a surrogate when human clinical efficacy trials are not feasible.  For this Special Issue of Pathogens, we invite you to submit research articles, review articles, and short notes highlighting the importance of animal models in infectious disease research and/or describing new models of viral, bacterial, and parasite infections.

Prof. Jason E. Comer
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pathogens is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • animal models
  • infectious disease
  • natural history studies

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
The Impact of Age and Sex on Mouse Models of Melioidosis
Pathogens 2020, 9(2), 113; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9020113 - 11 Feb 2020
Abstract
Mouse models have been used to generate critical data for many infectious diseases. In the case of Burkholderia pseudomallei, mouse models have been invaluable for bacterial pathogenesis studies as well as for testing novel medical countermeasures including both vaccines and therapeutics. Mouse [...] Read more.
Mouse models have been used to generate critical data for many infectious diseases. In the case of Burkholderia pseudomallei, mouse models have been invaluable for bacterial pathogenesis studies as well as for testing novel medical countermeasures including both vaccines and therapeutics. Mouse models of melioidosis have also provided a possible way forward to better understand the chronicity associated with this infection, as it appears that BALB/c mice develop an acute infection with B. pseudomallei, whereas the C57BL/6 model is potentially more suggestive of a chronic infection. Several unanswered questions, however, persist around this model. In particular, little attention has been paid to the effect of age or sex on the disease outcome in these animal models. In this report, we determined the LD50 of the B. pseudomallei K96243 strain in both female and male BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice in three distinct age groups. Our data demonstrated a modest increase in susceptibility associated with sex in this model, and we documented important histopathological differences associated with the reproductive systems of each sex. There was a statistically significant inverse correlation between age and susceptibility. The older mice, in most cases, were more susceptible to the infection. Additionally, our retrospective analyses suggested that the impact of animal supplier on disease outcome in mice may be minimal. These observations were consistent regardless of whether the mice were injected with bacteria intraperitoneally or if they were exposed to aerosolized bacteria. All of these factors should be considered when designing experiments using mouse models of melioidosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Animal Models of Infectious Disease)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Non-Human Primate Models of Dengue Virus Infection: A Comparison of Viremia Levels and Antibody Responses during Primary and Secondary Infection among Old World and New World Monkeys
Pathogens 2020, 9(4), 247; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9040247 - 27 Mar 2020
Abstract
Due to the global burden of dengue disease, a vaccine is urgently needed. One of the key points in vaccine development is the development of a robust and reliable animal model of dengue virus infection. Characteristics including the ability to sustain viral replication, [...] Read more.
Due to the global burden of dengue disease, a vaccine is urgently needed. One of the key points in vaccine development is the development of a robust and reliable animal model of dengue virus infection. Characteristics including the ability to sustain viral replication, demonstration of clinical signs, and immune response that resemble those of human dengue virus infection are vital in animal models. Preclinical studies in vaccine development usually include parameters such as safety evaluation, induction of viremia and antigenemia, immunogenicity, and vaccine effectiveness. Although mice have been used as a model, non-human primates have an advantage over mice because of their relative similarity to humans in their genetic composition and immune responses. This review compares the viremia kinetics and antibody responses of cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fasicularis), common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus), and tamarins (Saguinus midas and Saguinus labitus) and summarize the perspectives and the usefulness along with challenges in dengue vaccine development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Animal Models of Infectious Disease)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop