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Association of Yogurt Consumption with Nutrient Intakes, Nutrient Adequacy, and Diet Quality in American Children and Adults

1
National Dairy Council, 10255 West Higgins Road, Suite 900, Rosemont, IL 60018-5616, USA
2
NutriScience LLC, East Norriton, PA 19403, USA
3
Nutrition Impact, LLC, Battle Creek, MI 49014, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(11), 3435; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113435
Received: 7 October 2020 / Revised: 29 October 2020 / Accepted: 2 November 2020 / Published: 9 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Yogurt Consumption and Metabolic Health)
The popularity of yogurt has increased among consumers due to its perceived health benefits. This study examined the cross-sectional association between yogurt consumption and nutrient intake/adequacy, dietary quality, and body weight in children and adults. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001–2016 data (n = 65,799) were used and yogurt consumers were defined as those having any amount of yogurt during in-person 24-h diet recall. Usual intakes of nutrients were determined using the National Cancer Institute method and diet quality was calculated using the Healthy Eating Index-2015 (HEI-2015) scores after adjusting data for demographic and lifestyle factors. The data show that approximately 6.4% children and 5.5% adults consume yogurt, with a mean intake of yogurt of 150 ± 3 and 182 ± 3 g/d, respectively. Yogurt consumers had higher diet quality (10.3% and 15.2% higher HEI-2015 scores for children and adults, respectively); higher intakes of fiber, calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D; and higher percent of the population meeting recommended intakes for calcium, magnesium, and potassium than non-consumers. Consumption of yogurt was also associated with lower body weight, body mass index (BMI), and 23% showed a lower risk of being overweight/obese among adults only. In conclusion, yogurt consumption was associated with higher nutrient intake, nutrient adequacy, and diet quality in both children and adults. View Full-Text
Keywords: national health and nutrition examination survey; NHANES; healthy eating index; HEI; BMI; overweight; obese national health and nutrition examination survey; NHANES; healthy eating index; HEI; BMI; overweight; obese
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MDPI and ACS Style

Cifelli, C.J.; Agarwal, S.; Fulgoni, V.L., III. Association of Yogurt Consumption with Nutrient Intakes, Nutrient Adequacy, and Diet Quality in American Children and Adults. Nutrients 2020, 12, 3435. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113435

AMA Style

Cifelli CJ, Agarwal S, Fulgoni VL III. Association of Yogurt Consumption with Nutrient Intakes, Nutrient Adequacy, and Diet Quality in American Children and Adults. Nutrients. 2020; 12(11):3435. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113435

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cifelli, Christopher J.; Agarwal, Sanjiv; Fulgoni, Victor L., III. 2020. "Association of Yogurt Consumption with Nutrient Intakes, Nutrient Adequacy, and Diet Quality in American Children and Adults" Nutrients 12, no. 11: 3435. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113435

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