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Effect of a Nutritional Intervention on the Intestinal Microbiota

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Prebiotics and Probiotics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 July 2022) | Viewed by 16351

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Guest Editor
Department of Obesity Treatment, Metabolic Disorders and Clinical Dietetics, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, 60-569 Poznan, Poland
Interests: diet-related diseases; gut microbiota; life quality assessment tools
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The gut microbiota is considered as a new probable factor strongly connected with pathogenesis of many disease.  Commensal microbiota plays a crucial role in the regulation of intestinal immune homeostasis. The proper diet modification (i.e. FODMAP introduction) or probiotic supplementation is the key challange in civilization’s diseases as may reduce the clinical symptoms of the diseases, abdominal discomfort or influence the treatment outcome. The lower taxonomic levels of the beneficial bacteria, such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Roseburia intestinalis being responsible for butyric acid production and protection/modulation of the intestinal immune response is observed in Inflammatory Bowel Disease patients. The side effects related to chemotherapy or radiotherapy influence directly on the digestive system. The bacteria in the family Lactobacillus are the most frequently studied in oncology/gastroenterology and are considered to be possibly related to the reduction of undesirable effects such as: diarrhoea, constipation, nausea and vomiting. Therefore, it is necessary to highlight the need to search for methods to improve the patients’ quality of life.

Prof. Dr. Marta Stelmach-Mardas
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • Gut microbiota
  • Diet composition/Supplementation
  • Disease treatment
  • Civilization diseases

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Editorial

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2 pages, 196 KiB  
Editorial
Effects of Nutritional Interventions on Intestinal Microbiota
by Marta Stelmach-Mardas
Nutrients 2023, 15(12), 2694; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15122694 - 9 Jun 2023
Viewed by 902
Abstract
The gut microbiota is considered a new probable factor strongly connected with pathogenesis of many civilization’s diseases [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effect of a Nutritional Intervention on the Intestinal Microbiota)

Research

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19 pages, 9799 KiB  
Article
Weizmannia coagulans BC2000 Plus Ellagic Acid Inhibits High-Fat-Induced Insulin Resistance by Remodeling the Gut Microbiota and Activating the Hepatic Autophagy Pathway in Mice
by Long Jin, Hongyang Dang, Jinyong Wu, Lixia Yuan, Xiangsong Chen and Jianming Yao
Nutrients 2022, 14(19), 4206; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14194206 - 9 Oct 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2061
Abstract
(1) Background: Ellagic acid (EA) acts as a product of gut microbiota transformation to prevent insulin resistance, which is limited by high-fat diet (HFD)-induced dysbiosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the synergistic effects and mechanisms of supplementation with the probiotic [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Ellagic acid (EA) acts as a product of gut microbiota transformation to prevent insulin resistance, which is limited by high-fat diet (HFD)-induced dysbiosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the synergistic effects and mechanisms of supplementation with the probiotic Weizmannia coagulans (W. coagulans) on the prevention of insulin resistance by EA; (2) Methods: C57BL/6J mice were divided into five groups (n = 10/group): low-fat-diet group, high-fat-diet group, EA intervention group, EA + W. coagulans BC77 group, and EA + W. coagulans BC2000 group; (3) Result: W. coagulans BC2000 showed a synergistic effect on EA’s lowering insulin resistance index and inhibiting high-fat diet-induced endotoxemia. The combined effect of BC2000 and EA activated the autophagy pathway in the mouse liver, a urolithin-like effect. This was associated with altered β-diversity of gut microbiota and increased Eggerthellaceae, a potential EA-converting family. Ellagic acid treatment alone and the combined use of ellagic acid and W. coagulans BC77 failed to activate the hepatic autophagy pathway; (4) Conclusions: W. coagulans BC2000 can assist EA in its role of preventing insulin resistance. This study provides a basis for the development of EA-rich functional food supplemented with W. coagulans BC2000. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effect of a Nutritional Intervention on the Intestinal Microbiota)
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12 pages, 1830 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Nutritional Intervention with Lactoferrin, Galactooligosacharides and Vitamin D on the Gut Microbiota Composition of Healthy Elderly Women
by Prokopis Konstanti, Marloes van Splunter, Erik van den Brink, Clara Belzer, Arjen Nauta, R. J. Joost van Neerven and Hauke Smidt
Nutrients 2022, 14(12), 2468; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14122468 - 14 Jun 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2575
Abstract
Background: Nutritional supplements, such as bovine lactoferrin (bLF), have been studied for their immunomodulatory properties, but little is known of their effect on the gut microbiota composition of the elderly when supplemented alone or combined with other nutritional supplements such as prebiotics and [...] Read more.
Background: Nutritional supplements, such as bovine lactoferrin (bLF), have been studied for their immunomodulatory properties, but little is known of their effect on the gut microbiota composition of the elderly when supplemented alone or combined with other nutritional supplements such as prebiotics and micronutrients. In the present study, fecal samples from a double-blind, placebo-controlled nutritional intervention study were analysed. At baseline (T1), 25 elderly women were distributed into two groups receiving dietary intervention (n = 12) or placebo treatment (n = 13) for 9 weeks. During the first 3 weeks of the study (T2), the intervention group consumed 1 g/day bLF, followed by 3 weeks (T3) of 1 g/day bLF and 2.64 g/day active galactooligosaccharides (GOS), and 3 weeks (T4) of 1 g/day bLF, 2.64 g/day GOS and 20 μg/day of vitamin D. The placebo group received maltodextrin, in dosages matching those of the intervention group. Fecal bacterial composition was profiled using partial 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) were determined in fecal water as were levels of calprotectin, zonulin, and alpha-1-antitrypsin, as markers of gastrointestinal barrier and inflammation. Results: A significant increase was observed in the relative abundance of the genus Holdemanella (p < 0.01) in the intervention group compared to the placebo at T1. During T2, Bifidobacterium relative abundance increased significantly (p < 0.01) in the intervention group compared to the placebo, and remained significantly higher until the end of the study. No other effect was reported during T3. Furthermore, concentrations of SCFAs and calprotectin, zonulin and alpha-1-antitrypsin did not change during the intervention, although zonulin levels increased significantly within the placebo group by the end of the intervention. Conclusions: We conclude that supplementation of bLF enhanced the relative abundance of Holdemanella in the fecal microbiota of healthy elderly women, and further addition of GOS enhanced the relative abundance of Bifidobacterium. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effect of a Nutritional Intervention on the Intestinal Microbiota)
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17 pages, 2588 KiB  
Article
Effects of Whole Brown Bean and Its Isolated Fiber Fraction on Plasma Lipid Profile, Atherosclerosis, Gut Microbiota, and Microbiota-Dependent Metabolites in Apoe−/− Mice
by Jiyun Liu, Mohammed E. Hefni, Cornelia M. Witthöft, Maria Bergström, Stephen Burleigh, Margareta Nyman and Frida Hållenius
Nutrients 2022, 14(5), 937; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14050937 - 22 Feb 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2174
Abstract
The health benefits of bean consumption are widely recognized and are largely attributed to the dietary fiber content. This study investigated and compared the effects of whole brown beans and an isolated bean dietary fiber fraction on the plasma lipid profile, atherosclerotic plaque [...] Read more.
The health benefits of bean consumption are widely recognized and are largely attributed to the dietary fiber content. This study investigated and compared the effects of whole brown beans and an isolated bean dietary fiber fraction on the plasma lipid profile, atherosclerotic plaque amount, gut microbiota, and microbiota-dependent metabolites (cecal short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and plasma methylamines) in Apoe−/− mice fed high fat diets for 10.5 weeks. The results showed that both whole bean and the isolated fiber fraction had a tendency to lower atherosclerotic plaque amount, but not plasma lipid concentration. The whole bean diet led to a significantly higher diversity of gut microbiota compared with the high fat diet. Both bean diets resulted in a lower Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio, higher relative abundance of unclassified S24-7, Prevotella, Bifidobacterium, and unclassified Clostridiales, and lower abundance of Lactobacillus. Both bean diets resulted in higher formation of all cecal SCFAs (higher proportion of propionic acid and lower proportion of acetic acid) and higher plasma trimethylamine N-oxide concentrations compared with the high fat diet. Whole beans and the isolated fiber fraction exerted similar positive effects on atherosclerotic plaque amount, gut microbiota, and cecal SCFAs in Apoe−/− mice compared with the control diets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effect of a Nutritional Intervention on the Intestinal Microbiota)
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15 pages, 1604 KiB  
Article
The Efficacy of Short-Term Weight Loss Programs and Consumption of Natural Probiotic Bryndza Cheese on Gut Microbiota Composition in Women
by Ivan Hric, Simona Ugrayová, Adela Penesová, Žofia Rádiková, Libuša Kubáňová, Sára Šardzíková, Eva Baranovičová, Ľuboš Klučár, Gábor Beke, Marian Grendar, Martin Kolisek, Katarína Šoltys and Viktor Bielik
Nutrients 2021, 13(6), 1753; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13061753 - 21 May 2021
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 4424
Abstract
Weight loss interventions with probiotics have favourable effects on gut microbiota composition and derived metabolites. However, little is known about whether the consumption of natural probiotics, such as Bryndza cheeses, brings similar benefits. The purpose of the study was to find the effect [...] Read more.
Weight loss interventions with probiotics have favourable effects on gut microbiota composition and derived metabolites. However, little is known about whether the consumption of natural probiotics, such as Bryndza cheeses, brings similar benefits. The purpose of the study was to find the effect of short-term weight loss programs and Bryndza cheese consumption on the structure of the gut microbiota, microbiota-derived metabolites and body composition in middle-aged women. We conducted a randomised controlled intervention study. Twenty-two female participants with a body fat percentage ≥25% underwent a short weight loss program (4 weeks). Subjects were randomised to either the control or intervention group according to diet. The intervention group comprised 13 participants, whose diet contained 30 g of “Bryndza” cheese daily (WLPB). The control group comprised nine participants without the regular consumption of Bryndza cheese (WLP) in their diet. Both interventions lead to a significant and favourable change of BMI, body fat, waist circumference and muscle mass. Moreover, the relative abundance of Erysipelotrichales significantly increased in both groups. However, the relative abundance of lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillales, Streptococcaceae, Lactococcus and Streptococcus) significantly increased only in the WLPB group. Furthermore, short-chain fatty acid producers Phascolarctobacterium and Butyricimonas increased significantly in the WLPB group. A short-term weight loss program combined with Bryndza cheese consumption improves body composition and increases the abundance of lactic acid bacteria and short-chain fatty acid producers in middle-aged women. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effect of a Nutritional Intervention on the Intestinal Microbiota)
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Review

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13 pages, 678 KiB  
Review
Influence of Gluten-Free Diet on Gut Microbiota Composition in Patients with Coeliac Disease: A Systematic Review
by Iwona Kaliciak, Konstanty Drogowski, Aleksandra Garczyk, Stanisław Kopeć, Paulina Horwat, Paweł Bogdański, Marta Stelmach-Mardas and Marcin Mardas
Nutrients 2022, 14(10), 2083; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14102083 - 16 May 2022
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 3006
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the changes in microbiota composition during a gluten-free diet (GFD) in coeliac disease (CD) patients. The systematic search followed databases such as PUBMED (MEDLINE), SCOPUS, WEB OF SCIENCE and EMBASE. Out of 843 initially screened [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to assess the changes in microbiota composition during a gluten-free diet (GFD) in coeliac disease (CD) patients. The systematic search followed databases such as PUBMED (MEDLINE), SCOPUS, WEB OF SCIENCE and EMBASE. Out of 843 initially screened papers, a total number of 13 research papers were included. A total of 212 patients with CD on GFD, in comparison to 174 healthy individuals and 176 untreated patients with CD, were examined. Analysis of the microbial community based primarily on faecal samples and duodenal biopsies. Bifidobacterium was noticed to be less abundant in the study group than in both control groups, while the abundance of Bacteroides was more numerous in the group of CD patients on GFD. Staphylococcaceae prevailed in untreated CD patients. Despite the fact that the GFD was not able to fully restore commensal microorganism abundance, the treatment was associated with the greater abundance of selected beneficial bacteria and lower presence of pathogenic bacteria associated with worsening of CD symptoms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effect of a Nutritional Intervention on the Intestinal Microbiota)
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