Special Issue "Dietary Intake and Aging Brain"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Stephanie Rainey-Smith
Website
Guest Editor
Centre of Excellence for Alzheimer’s Disease Research & Care, School of Medical Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup 6027, Australia
Interests: Aging; Alzheimer’s; Dementia; Cognition; Neuroimaging; Nutrition; Sleep; Physical Activity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

The world’s population is growing older. Consequently, much work is underway focusing on the development of strategies to maintain health with advancing age. Diet represents one such strategy. However, many questions still need to be answered, including regarding which dietary components or patterns confer the greatest benefit, and to which systems of the body, what level of consumption is required and for what timeframe, and whether such strategies can reduce risk of age-related diseases such as Alzheimer’s and dementia. 

This Special Issue on ‘Dietary Intake and the Aging Brain’ seeks to address some of these knowledge gaps by publishing selected papers detailing specific aspects of nutrition that could play a role in maintaining brain health with advancing age. Particularly, papers (reviews, clinical and experimental studies) that examine the role of specific nutrients in cognitive function and brain health, both directly and indirectly, and contributions describing the development and validation of a novel dietary assessment for use in studies of Alzheimer’s disease and ageing, will be included.

Dr. Stephanie Rainey-Smith
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Alzheimer’s
  • Dementia
  • Cognition
  • Neuroimaging
  • Nutrition
  • Diet
  • Amyloid
  • Dietary Pattern

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Validation and Reliability of the Alzheimer’s Disease-Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Food Frequency Questionnaire
Nutrients 2020, 12(12), 3605; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123605 - 24 Nov 2020
Abstract
Accuracy in measuring intake of dietary constituents is an important issue in studies reporting the associations between diet and chronic diseases. We modified a Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) to include foods of interest in the field [...] Read more.
Accuracy in measuring intake of dietary constituents is an important issue in studies reporting the associations between diet and chronic diseases. We modified a Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) to include foods of interest in the field of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) research. The aim of the current study was to determine the reliability and validity of the AD-CSIROFFQ in 148 cognitively normal older adults. The AD-CSIROFFQ was completed before and after completion of a four-day weighed food record. Of the 508 food and beverage items reported, 309 had sufficient consumption levels for analysis of reliability. Of the 309 items, over 78% were significantly correlated between the two questionnaire administrations (Spearman’s rank correlations). We used two additional methods to assess absolute nutrient intake agreement between the AD-CSIROFFQ and the weighed food records (Pearson’s correlation coefficients and Bland–Altman plots) and quintile rankings to measure group level agreement. The adequate correlations observed between questionnaire responses suggest that the AD-CSIROFFQ is reliable. All nutrient intakes were acceptable for ranking of individuals on a group level, whilst the agreement levels with respect to the weighed food records for 11 of the 46 nutrients show validity in terms of their individual level absolute intake. The AD-CSIROFFQ makes an important contribution to the tools available for assessing usual dietary intake in groups of older adults with respect to AD research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Intake and Aging Brain)
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