Special Issue "Sugary Food Consumption and Its Impact on Health"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutritional Epidemiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Emilio Sacanella
Website
Guest Editor
Hospital Clinic de Barcelona, Ctr Invest Biomedica Red Fisiopatol Obesidad & Nu, Inst Invest Biomed August Pi Sunyer IDIBAPS, Madrid, Spain
Interests: randomized controlled trials; clinical nutrition; sugars; dietary fibre; nuts; dietary patterns; Mediterranean diet; dyslipidemia; diabetes; metabolic syndrome; overweight/obesity; cardiometabolic risk; cardiovascular disease; aging
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Rosa Casas
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Hospital Clinic de Barcelona, Ctr Invest Biomedica Red Fisiopatol Obesidad & Nu, Inst Invest Biomed August Pi Sunyer IDIBAPS, Madrid, Spain
Interests: randomized controlled trials; clinical nutrition; sugars; dietary fibre; legumes; glycaemic index; nuts; dietary patterns; Mediterranean diet; dyslipidemia; diabetes; metabolic syndrome; overweight/obesity; cardiometabolic risk; cardiovascular disease
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In western countries, processed food and drink consumption rich in free sugars is growing. As a result, a significant proportion of daily caloric intake comes from these components. In Europe, this proportion ranges from 15% to 26%, being mildly lower in adults compared to children. Thus, some dietary guidelines suggest limiting calories from added sugar to less than 10% per day. Recent meta-analyses and systematic reviews have confirmed the link between consumption of free sugars and weight gain in both children and adults. Additionally, other chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, and fatty liver disease have been linked to sugar intake. Finally, today, some investigators have also suggested a link between sugar intake and higher incidence of certain types of cancer, although this association is controversial for other researchers. On the other hand, current evidence suggests that decreasing sugar intake could help to keep us healthy.

Based on your expertise in this field, we think you could make an excellent contribution of either evidence-based original research or a review for the upcoming Special Issue.

Dr. Emilio Sacanella
Dr. Rosa M. Casas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sugar-containing beverages
  • Sugar-containing solid foods
  • Liquid sugars
  • Solid sugars
  • Sucrose
  • Fructose
  • Simple sugars
  • Added sugars
  • Overweight
  • Obesity
  • Body weight
  • BMI
  • Waist circumference
  • Adiposity
  • Visceral adipose tissue
  • Pregnancy
  • Microbiota
  • Cardiovascular risk factors
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Cancer
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Reformulation

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
High-Sugar Diet Disrupts Hypothalamic but Not Cerebral Cortex Redox Homeostasis
Nutrients 2020, 12(10), 3181; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103181 - 18 Oct 2020
Abstract
Despite several reports on the relationship between metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases, the effect of a high-sugar diet (HSD) on brain function is still unknown. Given the crucial role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of these disorders, this study was the first to [...] Read more.
Despite several reports on the relationship between metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases, the effect of a high-sugar diet (HSD) on brain function is still unknown. Given the crucial role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of these disorders, this study was the first to compare the effect of an HSD on the activity of prooxidative enzymes, enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, and protein oxidative damage in the brain structures regulating energy metabolism (hypothalamus) and cognitive functions (cerebral cortex). Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups (n = 10)—control diet (CD) and high-sugar diet (HSD)—for 8 weeks. We showed a decrease in glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activity and an increase in catalase activity in the hypothalamus of HSD rats compared to controls. The activity of xanthine oxidase and NADPH oxidase and the contents of oxidation (protein carbonyls), glycoxidation (dityrosine, kynurenine and N-formylkynurenine) and protein glycation products (advanced glycation end products and Amadori products) were significantly higher only in the hypothalamus of the study group. The HSD was also responsible for the disruption of antioxidant systems and oxidative damage to blood proteins, but we did not show any correlation between systemic redox homeostasis and the brain levels. In summary, HSD is responsible for disorders of enzymatic antioxidant defenses only at the central (plasma/serum) and hypothalamic levels but does not affect the cerebral cortex. The hypothalamus is much more sensitive to oxidative damage caused by an HSD than the cerebral cortex. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sugary Food Consumption and Its Impact on Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Trends in Beverage Consumption and Related Demographic Factors and Obesity among Korean Children and Adolescents
Nutrients 2020, 12(9), 2651; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092651 - 31 Aug 2020
Abstract
It is well known that reducing consumption of sugar is a global public health priority. Beverages were the primary source of total sugar intake from processed foods. However, there are few studies investigating the trend of beverage consumption among children and adolescents in [...] Read more.
It is well known that reducing consumption of sugar is a global public health priority. Beverages were the primary source of total sugar intake from processed foods. However, there are few studies investigating the trend of beverage consumption among children and adolescents in Korea. We examined the overall trend in beverage consumption among 11,996 participants aged 10–18 years who were enrolled in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) (1998–2018). Further, we examined the effect of beverage types on beverage consumption-related demographic factors and obesity among 6121 participants using the recent 24 h dietary recall data (2010–2018) that captured the consumption of fruit and vegetable juices, soft drinks, milk and milk-based products and alcoholic beverages. Demographic characteristics, including sex, age, body mass index, household income level and residential area, were considered. Consumers’ overall beverage intake and the percentage of energy derived from fruit and vegetable juices and soft drinks steadily increased from 1998 to 2016–2018 (p-trend < 0.0001); in contrast, dairy product consumption declined since 2010–2012. The main sources of beverage-based calories were fruit and vegetable juices (107.5 kcal/day), soft drinks (145.2 kcal/day), dairy products (181.8 kcal/day) and alcoholic beverages (103.5 kcal/day). Also, Korean adolescents aged 16–18 years consumed more soft drinks, fewer dairy products and higher alcoholic drinks than other age groups; particularly, boys consumed more energy from beverages (p < 0.0001). The odds ratios of obesity prevalence tended to be higher for soft drink consumption than for other beverages but this was not significant. The consumption of fruit and vegetable juices and milk and milk products showed a marginal association with a reduced risk of obesity prevalence. Since beverage consumption has increased steadily among Korean children and adolescents, appropriate interventions are needed. In the future, data from a larger sample of Korean children and adolescents are necessary to identify significant differences and longitudinal studies are necessary to examine the causalities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sugary Food Consumption and Its Impact on Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Carbohydrate Intake in Early Childhood and Body Composition and Metabolic Health: Results from the Generation R Study
Nutrients 2020, 12(7), 1940; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12071940 - 30 Jun 2020
Abstract
High sugar intake in childhood has been linked to obesity. However, the role of macronutrient substitutions and associations with metabolic health remain unclear. We examined associations of carbohydrate intake and its subtypes with body composition and metabolic health among 3573 children participating in [...] Read more.
High sugar intake in childhood has been linked to obesity. However, the role of macronutrient substitutions and associations with metabolic health remain unclear. We examined associations of carbohydrate intake and its subtypes with body composition and metabolic health among 3573 children participating in a population-based cohort in the Netherlands. Intake of total carbohydrate, monosaccharides and disaccharides, and polysaccharides at age 1 year was assessed with a food-frequency questionnaire. We repeatedly measured children’s height and weight to calculate BMI between their ages of 1 and 10 years. At ages 6 and 10 years, fat and fat-free mass were measured with dual-energy X-ray-absorptiometry and blood concentrations of triglycerides, cholesterol, and insulin were obtained. For all outcomes, we calculated age and sexspecific SD-scores. In multivariable-adjusted linear mixed models, we found no associations of intake of carbohydrates or its subtypes with children’s BMI or body composition. A higher intake of monosaccharides and disaccharides was associated with higher triglyceride concentrations (0.02 SDS per 10 g/day, 95% CI: 0.01, 0.04). Higher monosaccharide and disaccharide intake was also associated with lower HDL-cholesterol (−0.03 SDS, 95% CI: −0.04; −0.01), especially when it replaced polysaccharides. Overall, our findings suggest associations of higher monosaccharide and disaccharide intake in early childhood with higher triglyceride and lower HDL-cholesterol concentrations, but do not support associations with body composition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sugary Food Consumption and Its Impact on Health)
Open AccessArticle
Total and Free Sugars Consumption in a Slovenian Population Representative Sample
Nutrients 2020, 12(6), 1729; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061729 - 09 Jun 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Excessive free sugars consumption is associated with poor health outcomes. Thus, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends limiting free sugars intake to no more than 10% of total energy intake. To evaluate current intakes of dietary sugars and monitor the adherence to the [...] Read more.
Excessive free sugars consumption is associated with poor health outcomes. Thus, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends limiting free sugars intake to no more than 10% of total energy intake. To evaluate current intakes of dietary sugars and monitor the adherence to the guidelines, the objective of this study was to comprehensively assess total and free sugars consumption of different age groups within the Slovenian population. The Slovenian national food consumption survey SI.Menu 2017/18 was conducted on representative samples of adolescents (10–17 years), adults (18–64 years), and the elderly (65–74 years) using two non-consecutive 24-h dietary recalls. The analyses were carried out on a sample of 1248 study participants. Free sugars content in food was estimated based on previously established databases. The population weighted median free sugars intake accounted for 10.1% of total energy intake (TEI) among adolescents, 6.4% among adults, and 6.5% in the elderly population. Both total and free sugars consumption in the percentage of TEI were higher among women than men, in participants with lower education, and those with higher family net income. The main sources of free sugars in adolescents were beverages, cakes, muffins, pastry, and dairy products; for adults and the elderly, the key sources of free sugars were beverages, cakes, muffins, pastry, and sugars, honey, and related products. A total of 56% of adolescents, 84% of adults, and 81% of the elderly population adhered to the WHO free sugars guidelines. Additional measures will be required to further decrease free sugars consumption among the teenage population, in which dietary patterns are still of greatest concern. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sugary Food Consumption and Its Impact on Health)
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