Special Issue "Dietary Polyphenols and Cardiometabolic Diseases"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 October 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Julio Gálvez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Universitario de Cartuja s/n 18071, Granada, Spain
Interests: polyphenols, antioxidant, immune response, microbiota, probiotics, prebiotics, intestinal inflammation, metabolic syndrome, obesity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Polyphenols are compounds that are widely distributed throughout the vegetable kingdom, including edible plants. Different biological properties have been ascribed to these compounds, including antioxidant and immunomodulatory, which may be of great utility in acute and chronic conditions. In fact, the beneficial effects of various polyphenols on different cardiovascular-associated disorders, such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus type 2, and metabolic syndrome, are well-known. However, there is a clear demand from the scientific community to elucidate the exact mechanisms involved in these beneficial effects, like those concerning the impact of polyphenols on gut microbiota composition or the therapeutic properties of their metabolites generated after oral intake on cardiometabolic diseases.

This Special Issue of Nutrients, entitled “Dietary Polyphenols and Cardiometabolic Diseases”, welcomes the submission of manuscripts either describing original research or reviewing the scientific literature, including systematic reviews and meta-analyses. The proposed manuscripts should cover the effects of dietary polyphenols on cardiometabolic diseases, focused on the precise mechanisms involved, especially those related to the generation of metabolites and/or their impact on gut microbiota composition.

Dr. Julio Gálvez
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Polyphenols
  • Obesity
  • Hypertension
  • Foods
  • Metabolites
  • Gut microbiota

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Evidence on the Health Benefits of Supplemental Propolis
Nutrients 2019, 11(11), 2705; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112705 - 08 Nov 2019
Abstract
Propolis is a honey-related product with reported health benefits such as improved immunity, lowered blood pressure, treated allergies and skin conditions. A literature review and narrative synthesis were conducted to investigate the evidence on the reported health benefits and future direction of propolis [...] Read more.
Propolis is a honey-related product with reported health benefits such as improved immunity, lowered blood pressure, treated allergies and skin conditions. A literature review and narrative synthesis were conducted to investigate the evidence on the reported health benefits and future direction of propolis products. Using a predefined search strategy we searched Medline (OvidSP), Embase and Central for quantitative and qualitative studies (1990–2018). Citation, reference, hand searches and expert consultation were also undertaken. Studies of randomised control trials and observational data on humans with health-related outcomes were included. Collected data were entered into NVivo software (Version 12, QRS International) and analysed using a thematic framework and a narrative synthesis of emergent themes. A total of 63 publications were discussed. The majority were cell-based and animal studies, with a few key human trials conducted. There is significant promise for propolis as an effective antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent with particular promise in cardiometabolic health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Polyphenols and Cardiometabolic Diseases)
Open AccessReview
Protective Effects of Probiotic Consumption in Cardiovascular Disease in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Nutrients 2019, 11(11), 2676; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112676 - 05 Nov 2019
Abstract
The prevalence of renal and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is higher than in general populations. Recently, a causal role of gut microbiota on the development of immune responses in SLE has been described. Probiotic consumption changes the [...] Read more.
The prevalence of renal and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is higher than in general populations. Recently, a causal role of gut microbiota on the development of immune responses in SLE has been described. Probiotic consumption changes the composition of gut microbiota, preventing SLE progression. The aim of this review is to explore the role of the gut microbiota in the development of renal and cardiovascular disease in SLE and how probiotics could be a therapeutic option. Despite strong evidence on the beneficial effects of probiotics in the development of autoimmunity and nephritis in SLE, only a few studies described the protective effects of Lactobacillus in important risk factors for CVD, such as endothelial dysfunction and hypertension in mice. The preventive effects of probiotics in renal and CVD in humans have not been established yet. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Polyphenols and Cardiometabolic Diseases)
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Open AccessReview
Dietary Polyphenols—Important Non-Nutrients in the Prevention of Chronic Noncommunicable Diseases. A Systematic Review
Nutrients 2019, 11(5), 1039; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11051039 - 09 May 2019
Cited by 8
Abstract
The improvement of the social and economic conditions of society has eliminated the threat of death from the majority of infectious diseases. However, the rapid progress of civilization has created new possibilities for the appearance of factors with adverse effects for the health [...] Read more.
The improvement of the social and economic conditions of society has eliminated the threat of death from the majority of infectious diseases. However, the rapid progress of civilization has created new possibilities for the appearance of factors with adverse effects for the health of society. This has led to increased morbidity from certain diseases, the presence of which had not been observed several centuries ago. Chronic noncommunicable diseases (e.g., cancers, cardio-vascular disorders, diabetes, obesity, neurodegenerative diseases) result from an inappropriate relationship between people and their environment. The common characteristic for all chronic diseases is a “new” form of inflammation, very often called metaflammation, which is considered as a subclinical, permanent inflammation. As a result, metabolic cascade, including cellular oxidative stress, atherosclerotic process, and insulin resistance, occurs, which slowly generates significant deterioration in the organism. Polyphenols are the major group of non-nutrients, considering their diversity, food occurrence, and biological properties. The current review aims to present a wide spectrum of literature data, including the molecular mechanism of their activity and experimental model used, and summarize the recent findings on the multitude of physiological effects of dietary polyphenols towards the prevention of several chronic diseases. However, despite several studies, the estimation of their dietary intake is troublesome and inconclusive, which will be also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Polyphenols and Cardiometabolic Diseases)
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