Special Issue "Nutrition Challenges for Middle-Aged and Older Women"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Masakazu Terauchi
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Women's Health, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan
Interests: women’s health; menopause; osteoporosis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

During the menopausal transition and postmenopausal periods, women are affected by a variety of symptoms, such as hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal dryness, depression, anxiety, and insomnia. Non-specific somatic symptoms are also common, including muscle and joint pain, tiredness, and dizziness. Some of these effects (particularly vasomotor symptoms and vaginal atrophy) are closely associated with estrogen deficiency, but the exact mechanisms underlying the other symptoms are not fully understood.

Postmenopausal women are also at increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity as a net effect of central obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes, as well as for osteoporosis, cognitive decline, and genitourinary syndrome of menopause.

Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) has played a central role in improving menopausal symptoms and reducing the disease risks associated with estrogen deficiency. However, due to growing concern for the side effects of HRT, especially in patients with hormone-sensitive cancer such as breast and uterus cancer, research has turned to the effects of nutraceutical approaches to these symptoms and diseases.

In this Special Issue of Nutrients, we would like to bring together manuscripts dealing with the topic of “Nutrition Challenges for Middle-Aged and Older Women”. Topics may include dietary interventions with foods, altered nutrient intake or food supplements, and specific dietary pattern interventions, such as the Mediterranean Diet or calorie restriction, in humans.

Different types of manuscripts, including original clinical research articles and up-to-date reviews (systematic reviews and meta-analyses) are welcome.

Prof. Masakazu Terauchi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climacteric
  • menopause
  • perimenopause
  • postmenopause
  • diet
  • food
  • nutrition

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Effects of Chlorogenic Acids on Menopausal Symptoms in Healthy Women: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind, Parallel-Group Trial
Nutrients 2020, 12(12), 3757; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123757 - 07 Dec 2020
Abstract
A reduction in estrogen levels in the perimenopausal and postmenopausal periods causes various symptoms in women, such as hot flushes, sweats, depression, anxiety, and insomnia. Chlorogenic acids (CGAs), which are phenolic compounds widely present in plants such as coffee beans, have various physiological [...] Read more.
A reduction in estrogen levels in the perimenopausal and postmenopausal periods causes various symptoms in women, such as hot flushes, sweats, depression, anxiety, and insomnia. Chlorogenic acids (CGAs), which are phenolic compounds widely present in plants such as coffee beans, have various physiological functions. However, the effects of CGAs on menopausal symptoms are unknown. To examine the effects of CGAs on menopausal symptoms, especially hot flushes, a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-group trial was conducted in healthy women. Eighty-two subjects were randomized and assigned to receive CGAs (270 mg) tablets or the placebo for 4 weeks. After 4 weeks of intake, the number of hot flushes, the severity of hot flushes during sleep, and the severity of daytime sweats decreased significantly in the CGA group compared to the placebo group. The modified Kupperman index for menopausal symptoms decreased significantly after 2 weeks in the CGA group compared to the placebo group. Adverse effects caused by CGAs were not observed. The results show that continuous intake of CGAs resulted in improvements in menopausal symptoms, especially hot flushes, in healthy women. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition Challenges for Middle-Aged and Older Women)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Depressive Symptoms in Middle-Aged and Elderly Women Are Associated with a Low Intake of Vitamin B6: A Cross-Sectional Study
Nutrients 2020, 12(11), 3437; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113437 - 09 Nov 2020
Abstract
This study investigated the nutritional factors that are associated with anxiety and depressive symptoms in Japanese middle-aged and elderly women. We conducted a cross-sectional study with 289 study participants aged ≥40 years (mean age = 52.0 ± 6.9 years). Their dietary habits, menopausal [...] Read more.
This study investigated the nutritional factors that are associated with anxiety and depressive symptoms in Japanese middle-aged and elderly women. We conducted a cross-sectional study with 289 study participants aged ≥40 years (mean age = 52.0 ± 6.9 years). Their dietary habits, menopausal status and symptoms, and varied background factors, such as body composition, lifestyle factors, and cardiovascular parameters, were assessed. Their anxiety and depressive symptoms were evaluated using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), where scores of 0–7 points, 8–10 points, and 11–21 points on either the anxiety or depression subscales were categorized as mild, moderate, and severe, respectively. The dietary consumption of nutrients was assessed using a brief self-administered diet history questionnaire. The relationships between the moderate-to-severe anxiety/depressive symptoms and the dietary intake of 43 major nutrients were investigated using multivariate logistic regression analyses. After adjusting for age, menopausal status, and the background factors that were significantly related to depressive symptoms, moderate and severe depression was significantly inversely associated with only vitamin B6 (adjusted odds ratio per 10 μg/MJ in vitamin B6 intake = 0.89, 95% confidence interval = 0.80–0.99). A higher intake of vitamin B6 could help relieve depressive symptoms for this population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition Challenges for Middle-Aged and Older Women)
Open AccessArticle
Efficacy and Safety of Kudzu Flower–Mandarin Peel on Hot Flashes and Bone Markers in Women during the Menopausal Transition: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Nutrients 2020, 12(11), 3237; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113237 - 22 Oct 2020
Abstract
This randomized controlled study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of an extract mixture of kudzu flower and mandarin peel (KM) on hot flashes (HFs) and markers of bone turnover in women during the menopausal transition. Healthy women aged 45–60 years with [...] Read more.
This randomized controlled study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of an extract mixture of kudzu flower and mandarin peel (KM) on hot flashes (HFs) and markers of bone turnover in women during the menopausal transition. Healthy women aged 45–60 years with the menopausal HFs were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to either KM (1150 mg/day) or placebo arms for 12 weeks (n = 84). The intent-to-treat analysis found that compared with the placebo, the KM significantly attenuated HF scores (p = 0.041) and HF severities (p < 0.001), with a mean difference from baseline to week 12. The KM also improved bone turnover markers, showing a significant reduction in bone resorption CTx (p = 0.027) and a tendency of increasing bone formation OC relative to the placebo. No serious adverse events and hormonal changes were observed in both groups. These findings suggest that KM consumption may improve the quality of life in ways that are important to symptomatic menopausal women. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition Challenges for Middle-Aged and Older Women)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
The Change in the Content of Nutrients in Diets Eliminating Products of Animal Origin in Comparison to a Regular Diet from the Area of Middle-Eastern Europe
Nutrients 2020, 12(10), 2986; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12102986 - 29 Sep 2020
Abstract
Introduction: The diet of Poles became similar to the western style of nutrition. It is rich in saturated fats, it contains significant quantities of salt, and has very low fruit and vegetable content. On the other hand, introducing an incorrectly planned diet that [...] Read more.
Introduction: The diet of Poles became similar to the western style of nutrition. It is rich in saturated fats, it contains significant quantities of salt, and has very low fruit and vegetable content. On the other hand, introducing an incorrectly planned diet that eliminates animal products may be associated with the risk of deficiencies of certain vitamins and minerals. Taking into account the regular diet of Poles, a properly balanced vegetarian menu may be a better and safer choice for the proper functioning of the organism. Aim: The analysis of the content of individual types of vegetarian diets and a comparison with the menus of the regular diet of the Polish population. Materials and methods: 70 menus were subjected to a quantitative analysis, 10 menus for each 7 type of diet eliminating products of animal origin and regular diets without elimination. The caloricity of the designed diets was ±2000 kcal. The quantitative evaluation of the menus was performed using the Dieta 6d dietary program. Statistical significance was established at p ≤ 0.05. Results: It was observed that the regular diet of Poles (RD) featured the highest content of total fats, as well as saturated acids and cholesterol. The VEGAN diet was characterized by the lowest total protein content and the lack of wholesome protein and cholesterol. RD was characterized by the lowest average content of dietary fiber. The highest content of saccharose was observed in RD. Sodium content in RD significantly exceeded the recommended daily norm. RD featured insufficient content of the following minerals and vitamins: potassium, calcium, magnesium, iodine, Vitamin E, Vitamin C, folates, and Vitamin D. The norm for calcium has not been fulfilled also in milk-free and vegan diets. All of the analyzed diets lacked proper amounts of iodine and Vitamin D. The highest content of polyunsaturated fatty acids was observed in the VEGAN diet. The periodic elimination of meat and fatty dairy products should be included in the treatment of the metabolic syndrome, hypertensions, hyperlipidemia, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. Conclusions: The regular diet of Poles turned out to be more dangerous for health in terms of deficiencies than properly balanced diets eliminating products of animal origin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition Challenges for Middle-Aged and Older Women)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Daily Coffee and Green Tea Consumption Is Inversely Associated with Body Mass Index, Body Fat Percentage, and Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index in Middle-Aged Japanese Women: A Cross-Sectional Study
Nutrients 2020, 12(5), 1370; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051370 - 11 May 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
This study aimed to investigate the links between coffee (CF)/green tea (GT) consumption and body composition/cardiovascular parameters in middle-aged Japanese women. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 232 Japanese women aged 40–65 years who had been referred to the menopause clinic of Tokyo [...] Read more.
This study aimed to investigate the links between coffee (CF)/green tea (GT) consumption and body composition/cardiovascular parameters in middle-aged Japanese women. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 232 Japanese women aged 40–65 years who had been referred to the menopause clinic of Tokyo Medical and Dental University Hospital between November 2007 and August 2017. Body composition, cardiovascular parameters, and CF/GT consumption frequency were evaluated on their initial visits, using a body composition analyzer, vascular screening system, and brief-type self-administered diet history questionnaire, respectively. We investigated the associations between variables using multivariate logistic regression. After adjustment for age, menopausal status, and other factors, daily CF consumption was inversely associated with high body mass index (BMI) (adjusted odds ratio, 0.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.14–0.96) and body fat percentage (BF%) (0.33; 0.14–0.82), and daily GT consumption with high BF% (0.36; 0.14–0.96). Daily CF + GT consumption was also inversely associated with high BMI (0.15; 0.05–0.50) and BF% (0.30; 0.12–0.74). In pre- and perimenopausal women, daily CF + GT consumption was inversely associated with high cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) (0.05; 0.003–0.743). In conclusion, daily CF/GT consumption was inversely associated with high BMI, BF%, and CAVI in middle-aged Japanese women. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition Challenges for Middle-Aged and Older Women)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
The Diverse Efficacy of Food-Derived Proanthocyanidins for Middle-Aged and Elderly Women
Nutrients 2020, 12(12), 3833; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123833 - 15 Dec 2020
Abstract
Middle-aged and elderly women are affected by various symptoms and diseases induced by estrogen deficiency. Proanthocyanidins, widely present in many kinds of fruits and berries, have many beneficial effects, such as antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial activities. We researched the effects of proanthocyanidins for [...] Read more.
Middle-aged and elderly women are affected by various symptoms and diseases induced by estrogen deficiency. Proanthocyanidins, widely present in many kinds of fruits and berries, have many beneficial effects, such as antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial activities. We researched the effects of proanthocyanidins for middle-aged and elderly women, finding that it has been revealed in many clinical trials and cohort studies that proanthocyanidins contribute to the prevention of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, obesity, cancer, osteoporosis, and urinary tract infection, as well as the improvement of menopausal symptoms, renal function, and skin damage. Thus, proanthocyanidins can be considered one of the potent representatives of complementary alternative therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition Challenges for Middle-Aged and Older Women)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Postmenopausal disease risks and nutrients
Authors: Asuka Hirose
Affiliation: Tokyo Medical and Dental University

Back to TopTop