Special Issue "Nutrigenomics and the Future of Nutrition"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrigenetics and Nutrigenomics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 September 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Lynnette Ferguson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Discipline of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
Interests: nutrigenetics; nutrigenomics; nutrigenomics technologies; genetic toxicology; DNA damage and repair; environmental mutagenesis; environmental carcinogenesis; mechanisms of anticancer drug action; gene–diet interactions—particularly in prostate and colorectal cancer; inflammatory bowel disease and other inflammation-related disorders
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Ahmed El-Sohemy
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Canada
Interests: nutrigenetics; biomarkers; food preferences; genetic testing; cardiometabolic disease; athletic performance
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is increasing awareness among researchers and healthcare professionals that the one-size-fits-all, population-based approach to nutritional guidance is inefficient and sometimes ineffective. Many studies have now shown that variations in genes can explain why some individuals respond differently from others to the same foods, beverages, and supplements they consume. The application of various -omics technologies to studies linking nutrition with human health and performance has enhanced our understanding of the effects of specific nutrients, food bioactives and dietary patterns and helped to explain the basis for individual differences in response. Findings in this area have also helped us to understand individual nutritional requirements, identify the presence of food preferences and intolerances, and establish specific food bioactives and dietary patterns that improve health and performance. The behavioural, social, ethical and legal aspects of genetic testing for personalised nutrition are also of great interest to the field.

This Special Issue of Nutrients aims to highlight the latest advances and showcase the current state of the science and latest findings in the field of nutritional genomics (nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics). Submissions may include studies that explore gene–diet interactions using various experimental models, clinical trials and population-based approaches. Submissions of manuscripts are welcome that describe original research or reviews (systematic reviews and meta-analyses). The scientific advances in the field of nutritional genomics will continue to pave the path towards personalised and precision nutrition for optimal health and performance.

Prof. Dr. Lynnette Ferguson
Prof. Ahmed El-Sohemy
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information 

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nutrigenetics
  • Nutrigenomics
  • Gene–diet interactions
  • GWAS
  • Biomarkers
  • Personalized nutrition
  • Precision nutrition
  • Nutritional genomics

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Hepatic Nfe2l2 Is Not an Essential Mediator of the Metabolic Phenotype Produced by Dietary Methionine Restriction
Nutrients 2021, 13(6), 1788; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13061788 - 24 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 934
Abstract
The principal sensing of dietary methionine restriction (MR) occurs in the liver, where it activates multiple transcriptional programs that mediate various biological components of the response. Hepatic Fgf21 is a key target and essential endocrine mediator of the metabolic phenotype produced by dietary [...] Read more.
The principal sensing of dietary methionine restriction (MR) occurs in the liver, where it activates multiple transcriptional programs that mediate various biological components of the response. Hepatic Fgf21 is a key target and essential endocrine mediator of the metabolic phenotype produced by dietary MR. The transcription factor, Nfe2l2, is also activated by MR and functions in tandem with hepatic Atf4 to transactivate multiple, antioxidative components of the integrated stress response. However, it is unclear whether the transcriptional responses linked to Nfe2l2 activation by dietary MR are essential to the biological efficacy of the diet. Using mice with liver-specific deletion of Nfe2l2 (Nfe2l2fl/(Alb)) and their floxed littermates (Nfe2l2fl/fl) fed either Control or MR diets, the absence of hepatic Nfe2l2 had no effect on the ability of the MR diet to increase FGF21, reduce body weight and adiposity, and increase energy expenditure. Moreover, the primary elements of the hepatic transcriptome were similarly affected by MR in both genotypes, with the only major differences occurring in induction of the P450-associated drug metabolism pathway and the pentose glucuronate interconversion pathway. The biological significance of these pathways is uncertain but we conclude that hepatic Nfe2l2 is not essential in mediating the metabolic effects of dietary MR. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrigenomics and the Future of Nutrition)
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Article
Akkermansia, a Possible Microbial Marker for Poor Glycemic Control in Qataris Children Consuming Arabic Diet—A Pilot Study on Pediatric T1DM in Qatar
Nutrients 2021, 13(3), 836; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13030836 - 04 Mar 2021
Viewed by 803
Abstract
In Qatar, Type 1 Diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is one of the most prevalent disorders. This study aimed to explore the gut microbiome’s relation to the continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy, dietary habits, and the HbA1c level in the pediatric T1DM subjects in [...] Read more.
In Qatar, Type 1 Diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is one of the most prevalent disorders. This study aimed to explore the gut microbiome’s relation to the continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy, dietary habits, and the HbA1c level in the pediatric T1DM subjects in Qatar. We recruited 28 T1DM subjects with an average age of 10.5 ± 3.53 years. The stool sample was used to measure microbial composition by 16s rDNA sequencing method. The results have revealed that the subjects who had undergone CSII therapy had increased microbial diversity and genus Akkermansia was significantly enriched in the subjects without CSII therapy. Moreover, genus Akkermansia was higher in the subjects with poor glycemic control (HbA1c > 7.5%). When we classified the subjects based on dietary patterns and nationality, Akkermansia was significantly enriched in Qataris subjects without the CSII therapy consuming Arabic diet than expatriates living in Qatar and eating a Western/mixed diet. Thus, this pilot study showed that abundance of Akkermansia is dependent on the Arabic diet only in poorly controlled Qataris T1DM patients, opening new routes to personalized treatment for T1DM in Qataris pediatric subjects. Further comprehensive studies on the relation between the Arabic diet, ethnicity, and Akkermansia are warranted to confirm this preliminary finding. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrigenomics and the Future of Nutrition)
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Article
Effects of Daily Raspberry Consumption on Immune-Metabolic Health in Subjects at Risk of Metabolic Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Nutrients 2020, 12(12), 3858; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123858 - 17 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1314
Abstract
Consumption of red raspberries has been reported to exert acute beneficial effects on postprandial glycemia, insulinemia, triglyceridemia, and cytokine levels in metabolically disturbed subjects. In a two-arm parallel-group, randomized, controlled trial, 59 subjects with overweight or abdominal obesity and with slight hyperinsulinemia or [...] Read more.
Consumption of red raspberries has been reported to exert acute beneficial effects on postprandial glycemia, insulinemia, triglyceridemia, and cytokine levels in metabolically disturbed subjects. In a two-arm parallel-group, randomized, controlled trial, 59 subjects with overweight or abdominal obesity and with slight hyperinsulinemia or hypertriglyceridemia were randomized to consume 280 g/day of frozen raspberries or to maintain their usual diet for 8 weeks. Primary analyses measured metabolic differences between the groups. Secondary analyses performed with omics tools in the intervention group assessed blood gene expression and plasma metabolomic changes following the raspberry supplementation. The intervention did not significantly affect plasma insulin, glucose, inflammatory marker concentrations, nor blood pressure. Following the supplementation, 43 genes were differentially expressed, and several functional pathways were enriched, a major portion of which were involved in the regulation of cytotoxicity, immune cell trafficking, protein signal transduction, and interleukin production. In addition, 10 serum metabolites were found significantly altered, among which β-alanine, trimethylamine N-oxide, and bioactive lipids. Although the supplementation had no meaningful metabolic effects, these results highlight the impact of a diet rich in raspberry on the immune function and phospholipid metabolism, thus providing novel insights into potential immune-metabolic pathways influenced by regular raspberry consumption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrigenomics and the Future of Nutrition)
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Article
Exploring Attitudes, Subjective Norms and Perceived Behavioural Control in a Genetic-Based and a Population-Based Weight Management Intervention: A One-Year Randomized Controlled Trial
Nutrients 2020, 12(12), 3768; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123768 - 08 Dec 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1272
Abstract
Background: Several studies demonstrate that the provision of personalized lifestyle advice, based on genetics, can help motivate individuals to engage in greater nutrition and physical activity changes compared to the provision of population-based advice. The theoretical mechanism behind this phenomenon is poorly understood. [...] Read more.
Background: Several studies demonstrate that the provision of personalized lifestyle advice, based on genetics, can help motivate individuals to engage in greater nutrition and physical activity changes compared to the provision of population-based advice. The theoretical mechanism behind this phenomenon is poorly understood. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of providing genetically tailored and population-based lifestyle advice on key constructs of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB). Materials and Methods: A pragmatic, cluster randomized controlled trial (n = 140) took place at the East Elgin Family Health Team, in Aylmer, Ontario, Canada. Participants were primarily Caucasian females enrolled in a weight management program (BMI ≥ 25.0 kg/m2). Weight management program groups were randomized (1:1) to receive a population-based lifestyle intervention for weight management (Group Lifestyle Balance™ (GLB)) or a lifestyle genomics (LGx)-based lifestyle intervention for weight management (GLB+LGx). Attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control were measured at baseline, immediately after receiving a report of population-based or genetic-based recommendations and after 3-, 6- and 12-month follow-ups. Linear mixed models were conducted, controlling for measures of actual behavioural control. All analyses were intention-to-treat by originally assigned groups. Results: Significant changes (p < 0.05) in attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioural control tended to be short-term in the GLB group and long-term for the GLB+LGx group. Short-term and long-term between-group differences in measures of subjective norms were discovered, favouring the GLB+LGx group. Conclusions: The TPB can help provide a theoretical explanation for studies demonstrating enhanced behaviour change with genetic-based lifestyle interventions. Clinical Trial Registration: NCT03015012. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrigenomics and the Future of Nutrition)
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