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Exploring Attitudes, Subjective Norms and Perceived Behavioural Control in a Genetic-Based and a Population-Based Weight Management Intervention: A One-Year Randomized Controlled Trial

by 1,2,3,4,*, 3,5,6,7,8,9,10, 4 and 10,11
1
Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada
2
The East Elgin Family Health Team, Aylmer, ON N5H 1K9, Canada
3
Human Environments Analysis Laboratory, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada
4
Centre Nutrition, Santé et Société (NUTRISS) and Institute of Nutrition and Functional Foods (INAF), Laval University, Quebec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
5
Department of Geography, Western University, London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada
6
School of Health Studies, Western University, London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada
7
Department of Paediatrics, Western University, London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada
8
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Western University, London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada
9
Children’s Health Research Institute, London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada
10
Lawson Health Research Institute, London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada
11
School of Food and Nutritional Sciences, Brescia University College, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(12), 3768; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123768
Received: 2 November 2020 / Revised: 3 December 2020 / Accepted: 4 December 2020 / Published: 8 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrigenomics and the Future of Nutrition)
Background: Several studies demonstrate that the provision of personalized lifestyle advice, based on genetics, can help motivate individuals to engage in greater nutrition and physical activity changes compared to the provision of population-based advice. The theoretical mechanism behind this phenomenon is poorly understood. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of providing genetically tailored and population-based lifestyle advice on key constructs of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB). Materials and Methods: A pragmatic, cluster randomized controlled trial (n = 140) took place at the East Elgin Family Health Team, in Aylmer, Ontario, Canada. Participants were primarily Caucasian females enrolled in a weight management program (BMI ≥ 25.0 kg/m2). Weight management program groups were randomized (1:1) to receive a population-based lifestyle intervention for weight management (Group Lifestyle Balance™ (GLB)) or a lifestyle genomics (LGx)-based lifestyle intervention for weight management (GLB+LGx). Attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control were measured at baseline, immediately after receiving a report of population-based or genetic-based recommendations and after 3-, 6- and 12-month follow-ups. Linear mixed models were conducted, controlling for measures of actual behavioural control. All analyses were intention-to-treat by originally assigned groups. Results: Significant changes (p < 0.05) in attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioural control tended to be short-term in the GLB group and long-term for the GLB+LGx group. Short-term and long-term between-group differences in measures of subjective norms were discovered, favouring the GLB+LGx group. Conclusions: The TPB can help provide a theoretical explanation for studies demonstrating enhanced behaviour change with genetic-based lifestyle interventions. Clinical Trial Registration: NCT03015012. View Full-Text
Keywords: theory of planned behaviour; theory of planned behavior; randomized controlled trial; behaviour change; behavioural determinants; nutrigenomics; nutrigenetics; lifestyle genomics; personalized nutrition theory of planned behaviour; theory of planned behavior; randomized controlled trial; behaviour change; behavioural determinants; nutrigenomics; nutrigenetics; lifestyle genomics; personalized nutrition
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MDPI and ACS Style

Horne, J.R.; Gilliland, J.A.; Vohl, M.-C.; Madill, J. Exploring Attitudes, Subjective Norms and Perceived Behavioural Control in a Genetic-Based and a Population-Based Weight Management Intervention: A One-Year Randomized Controlled Trial. Nutrients 2020, 12, 3768. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123768

AMA Style

Horne JR, Gilliland JA, Vohl M-C, Madill J. Exploring Attitudes, Subjective Norms and Perceived Behavioural Control in a Genetic-Based and a Population-Based Weight Management Intervention: A One-Year Randomized Controlled Trial. Nutrients. 2020; 12(12):3768. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123768

Chicago/Turabian Style

Horne, Justine R., Jason A. Gilliland, Marie-Claude Vohl, and Janet Madill. 2020. "Exploring Attitudes, Subjective Norms and Perceived Behavioural Control in a Genetic-Based and a Population-Based Weight Management Intervention: A One-Year Randomized Controlled Trial" Nutrients 12, no. 12: 3768. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123768

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