Special Issue "Impact of Dietary Components on Gut Microbiota"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Isabel Goñi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University Complutense of Madrid, Spain
Interests: Human Nutrition; Dietary Pattern; Functional Ingredients; Intestinal Microbiota; Dietary Fiber and Associated Bioactive Compounds; Antioxidant dietary Fibers; Prebiotic Dietary Fibers; Glycemic response. Bioavailability and Intestinal Bioaccessibility of Bioactive Compounds

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The essential role of diet in human health has been widely demonstrated. The triple interaction between the non-digestible components of a diet (dietary fiber and associated bioactive compounds), the colonic microbiota, and the intestinal cells determines the health of the gut ecosystem and, consequently, of the body. The colonic microbiota is a multifaceted integrator organ with defensive, trophic, and metabolic functions modulated by the diet, especially by the non-digestible components of food. Dysbiosis is also known to be a potent risk factor for numerous organic alterations related to food behavior, obesity, immunity, diabetes, etc. However, a dietary pattern including a great variety of foods rich in dietary fiber and bioactive compounds is associated with a “healthy microbiota” that enhances the wellness of the intestinal ecosystem. Therefore, a healthy dietary pattern and the use of biotic products are some of the most common strategies to modulate and support the symbiotic microbial communities that colonize the gut tract. In order to better understand the impact of dietary components on the gut microbiota, more interdisciplinary studies are needed.

This Special Issue entitled “Impact of dietary components on the gut microbiota” welcomes the submission of original research manuscripts, reviews, clinical trials, interventions studies, or meta-analyses concerning the relationships between food components, ingredients, or whole diets and the colonic microbiota, as well as their role in human health.

Dr. Isabel Goñi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Colonic microbiota
  • Dietary fiber
  • Bioactive compounds
  • Biotic products
  • Dysbiosis
  • Healthy dietary pattern

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Changes in Intestinal Microbiota and Predicted Metabolic Pathways During Colonic Fermentation of Mango (Mangifera indica L.)—Based Bar Indigestible Fraction
Nutrients 2020, 12(3), 683; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030683 - 03 Mar 2020
Abstract
Mango (Mangifera indica L.) peel and pulp are a source of dietary fiber (DF) and phenolic compounds (PCs) that constituent part of the indigestible fraction (IF). This fraction reaches the colon and acts as a carbon and energy source for intestinal microbiota. [...] Read more.
Mango (Mangifera indica L.) peel and pulp are a source of dietary fiber (DF) and phenolic compounds (PCs) that constituent part of the indigestible fraction (IF). This fraction reaches the colon and acts as a carbon and energy source for intestinal microbiota. The effect of mango IF on intestinal microbiota during colonic fermentation is unknown. In this study, the isolated IF of a novel ‘Ataulfo’ mango-based bar (snack) UV-C irradiated and non-irradiated (UVMangoB and MangoB) were fermented. Colonic fermentation occurred in vitro under chemical-enzymatic, semi-anaerobic, batch culture and controlled pH colonic conditions. Changes in the structure of fecal microbiota were analyzed by 16s rRNA gene Illumina MiSeq sequencing. The community´s functional capabilities were determined in silico. The MangoB and UVMangoB increased the presence of Faecalibacterium, Roseburia, Eubacterium, Fusicatenibacter, Holdemanella, Catenibacterium, Phascolarctobacterium, Buttiauxella, Bifidobacterium, Collinsella, Prevotella and Bacteroides genera. The alpha indexes showed a decrease in microbial diversity after 6 h of colonic fermentation. The coordinates analysis indicated any differences between irradiated and non-irradiated bar. The metabolic prediction demonstrated that MangoB and UVMangoB increase the microbiota carbohydrate metabolism pathway. This study suggests that IF of mango-based bar induced beneficial changes on microbial ecology and metabolic pathway that could be promissory to prevention or treatment of metabolic dysbiosis. However, in vivo interventions are necessary to confirm the interactions between microbiota modulating and intestinal beneficial effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Dietary Components on Gut Microbiota)
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Open AccessArticle
Microbiological and Immunological Markers in Milk and Infant Feces for Common Gastrointestinal Disorders: A Pilot Study
Nutrients 2020, 12(3), 634; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030634 - 27 Feb 2020
Abstract
The objective of this pilot study was to assess the fecal microbiome and different immunological parameters in infant feces and maternal milk from mother–infant pairs in which the infants were suffering from different gastrointestinal disorders (colic, non-IgE-mediated cow milk protein allergy (CMPA), and [...] Read more.
The objective of this pilot study was to assess the fecal microbiome and different immunological parameters in infant feces and maternal milk from mother–infant pairs in which the infants were suffering from different gastrointestinal disorders (colic, non-IgE-mediated cow milk protein allergy (CMPA), and proctocolitis). A cohort of 30 mother–infant pairs, in which the infants were diagnosed with these gastrointestinal disorders or included as healthy controls, were recruited. Bacterial composition of infant feces and breast milk was determined by metataxonomic sequencing. Immunological compounds were quantified using multiplexed immunoassays. A higher abundance of Eggerthellaceae, Lachnospiraceae and Peptostreptococcaceae, and lower abundance of Bifidobacterium and higher abundance of Rothia were registered in fecal samples from the CMPA group. Eggerthellaceae was also significantly more abundant in milk samples of the CMPA group. There were no differences in the concentration of immunological compounds in infant fecal samples between the four groups. In contrast, differences were found in the concentration and/or frequency of compounds related to acquired immunity and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) in breast milk samples. In conclusion, a few microbial signatures in feces may explain part of the difference between CMPA and other infants. In addition, some milk immunological signatures have been uncovered among the different conditions addressed in this pilot study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Dietary Components on Gut Microbiota)
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Open AccessArticle
Intake of a Mixture of Sake Cake and Rice Malt Increases Mucin Levels and Changes in Intestinal Microbiota in Mice
Nutrients 2020, 12(2), 449; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020449 - 11 Feb 2020
Abstract
Amazake is a traditional Japanese beverage. Its main ingredients are sake cake and rice malt. In this study, we examined the effect of sake cake and rice malt on the intestinal barrier function and gut microbiota. BALB/c mice were fed a control diet [...] Read more.
Amazake is a traditional Japanese beverage. Its main ingredients are sake cake and rice malt. In this study, we examined the effect of sake cake and rice malt on the intestinal barrier function and gut microbiota. BALB/c mice were fed a control diet or a diet containing a mixture of sake cake and rice malt powder (SRP) for four weeks. Fecal IgA values did not change between groups, but the fecal mucin level was significantly greater in the SRP-fed group. Gene expression analysis in the ileum by real-time PCR demonstrated Muc2 expression did not change, while the Muc3 expression was upregulated in the SRP-fed group. Furthermore, microbiota analysis demonstrated a change by SRP intake at the family level, and the proportion of Lactobacillaceae significantly increased in the SRP-fed group. At the genus level, the proportion of Lactobacillus also significantly increased in the SRP-fed group. These results suggest that the intake of a mixture of sake cake and rice malt improves intestinal barrier function by increasing mucin levels and inducing changes in intestinal microbiota. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impact of Dietary Components on Gut Microbiota)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

  1. Title: Impact of consumption of polyphenol-rich fruit and vegetables on the human gut microbiota
    Author: Isabel Goñi ([email protected])
    Address: Dpt. Nutrition and Food Science, University Complutense, Madrid,Spain
  2. Title: Impact of wine polyphenols on gut microbiota: protective effects on brain function (Review)
    Author: Victoria Moreno-Arribas ([email protected])
    Address: Institute of Food Science Research (CIAL). Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Spain
  3. Title: Changes in gut microbiota communities during in vitro colonic fermentation of non-digestible components of mango (Mangífera indica)
    Author: Sonia Sáyago-Ayerdi ([email protected])
    Address: Instituto Tecnológico de Tepic. Tepic Nayarit, Mexico
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