Special Issue "Diet, Environmental Factors and Autoimmune Diseases: Can We Find a Path for Preventive Lifestyle?"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutritional Immunology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 April 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Kayo Masuko
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biochemistry, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Kanagawa 216-8511, Japan
Interests: nutrition; diet; inflammation; autoimmunity; rheumatoid arthritis; systemic lupus erythematosus; Sjögren syndrome

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cumulative reports indicate that dietary intake and other life-style aspects would have a significant impact on autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. For example, the quality of diet, intake of green tea catechin, history of smoking, and vitamin D levels via exposure to sunlight are proposed to modulate the immune response, possibly playing a role in the pathogenesis of immune-mediated diseases. Such findings imply that we may be able to open a new avenue to prevent or manage autoimmune diseases by modifying our lifestyle, in which dietary intake being the critical factor.

The Special Issue aims to provide a forum to discuss the potential contribution of dietary intake, nutrients, and other nutrition-related habits or lifestyle in autoimmune diseases, seeking their possible roles in preventing the diseases' occurrence or progression.  In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following: diet, nutrition, nutrients, minerals, periodontal diseases, smoking, alcohol, gut microbiota, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren syndrome, systemic sclerosis, Behcet disease, idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, autoimmune thyroiditis. I am looking forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Kayo Masuko
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Dietary habits
  • Nutrients
  • Nutrition and physical activity
  • Lifestyle
  • autoimmunity
  • rheumatoid arthritis
  • systemic lupus erythematosus
  • Sjögren syndrome

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Association between Diet and Xerostomia: Is Xerostomia a Barrier to a Healthy Eating Pattern?
Nutrients 2021, 13(12), 4235; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13124235 - 25 Nov 2021
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Abstract
Objective. Xerostomia is a subjective feeling of dry mouth and is commonly observed in patients with autoimmune diseases. Our study examines the association between xerostomia and diet. Materials and Methods. The cross-sectional study includes 1405 adults from 15 Lithuanian geographical areas (52% response [...] Read more.
Objective. Xerostomia is a subjective feeling of dry mouth and is commonly observed in patients with autoimmune diseases. Our study examines the association between xerostomia and diet. Materials and Methods. The cross-sectional study includes 1405 adults from 15 Lithuanian geographical areas (52% response rate). A self-reported questionnaire inquired about xerostomia, sex, age, education, residence, and consumption of selected 23 diet items. For the multivariable analysis, 23 diet items were categorized into eight major diet groups. The data were analyzed by bivariate and multivariable analyses. Results. When comparing participants with and without xerostomia, there were significant differences in consumption frequencies concerning cold-pressed oil (p = 0.013), bread (p = 0.029), processed meat products (p = 0.016), fat and lean fish (p = 0.009), and probiotic supplements (p = 0.002). In the multivariable binary logistic regression model, when controlled for other determinants, the higher consumption of carbohydrates (OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.23–0.65), proteins (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.32–0.99), and oils (OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.34–1.00) was associated with a lower likelihood of xerostomia. Conclusions. The association between xerostomia and the consumption of the six diet items—cold-pressed oils, lean and fat fish, bread, processed meat, and probiotic supplements— and the three major diet groups—carbohydrates, proteins, and oils—was observed. Longitudinal studies are needed to validate the observed associations. Full article
Article
Are Nutritional Patterns among Polish Hashimoto Thyroiditis Patients Differentiated Internally and Related to Ailments and Other Diseases?
Nutrients 2021, 13(11), 3675; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13113675 - 20 Oct 2021
Viewed by 665
Abstract
There is not any diet recommended for Hashimoto’s disease, despite that those patients are often undernourished. Because of the high heterogeneity of Hashimoto’s patients, insight into dietary patterns might shed some light on the patient-tailored dietary approach, thus improving their treatment and helping [...] Read more.
There is not any diet recommended for Hashimoto’s disease, despite that those patients are often undernourished. Because of the high heterogeneity of Hashimoto’s patients, insight into dietary patterns might shed some light on the patient-tailored dietary approach, thus improving their treatment and helping to identify patients with the highest probability of particular nutritional deficiencies. The aim of this study was to identify Hashimoto’s patients’ dietary patterns and their characterization based on both socio-demographic variables and dietary self-assessment. We collected data online from patients with Hashimoto’s disease. The questionnaire formula used in the study was developed based on a validated food frequency questionnaire KomPAN®. K-means pattern analyses were used to characterize patients into patterns based on the frequency of particular types of foods consumption and socio-demographic factors. Four patterns were identified. We labeled them as ‘Convenient’, ‘Non-meat’, ‘Pro-healthy’, and ‘Carnivores’ with participants proportions at approximately one-fourth per each pattern. The patients were mainly of the female gender (94.08%), with a female: male ratio of 15.9. Hashimoto’s patients differed in their food product choices, food choice motives, dieting experience, nutritional knowledge, smoking habits, food allergies and intolerances, and lipid disorders, and thus represent different eating patterns. However, these patterns were not determined by comorbidities or the majority of ailments. Full article
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Review

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Review
Antioxidant, Anti-Inflammatory, and Immunomodulatory Properties of Tea—The Positive Impact of Tea Consumption on Patients with Autoimmune Diabetes
Nutrients 2021, 13(11), 3972; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13113972 - 07 Nov 2021
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Abstract
The physiological markers of autoimmune diabetes include functional disorders of the antioxidative system as well as progressing inflammation and the presence of autoantibodies. Even though people with type 1 diabetes show genetic predispositions facilitating the onset of the disease, it is believed that [...] Read more.
The physiological markers of autoimmune diabetes include functional disorders of the antioxidative system as well as progressing inflammation and the presence of autoantibodies. Even though people with type 1 diabetes show genetic predispositions facilitating the onset of the disease, it is believed that dietary factors can stimulate the initiation and progression of the disease. This paper analyses the possibility of using tea as an element of diet therapy in the treatment of type 1 diabetes. Based on information available in literature covering the last 10 years, the impact of regular tea consumption or diet supplements containing tea polyphenols on the oxidative status as well as inflammatory and autoimmune response of the organism was analyzed. Studies conducted on laboratory animals, human patients, and in vitro revealed positive effects of the consumption of tea or polyphenols isolated therefrom on the diabetic body. Few reports available in the literature pertain to the impact of tea on organisms affected by type 1 diabetes as most (over 85%) have focused on cases of type 2 diabetes. It has been concluded that by introducing tea into the diet, it is possible to alleviate some of the consequences of oxidative stress and inflammation, thus limiting their destructive impact on the patients’ organisms, consequently improving their quality of life, regardless of the type of diabetes. Furthermore, elimination of inflammation should reduce the incidence of immune response. One should consider more widespread promotion of tea consumption by individuals genetically predisposed to diabetes, especially considering the drink’s low price, easy availability, overall benefits to human health, and above all, the fact that it can be safely used over extended periods of time, regardless of the patient’s age. Full article
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