Special Issue "Advances in Toxicity of Nanoparticles"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Chiara Uboldi
Website
Guest Editor
Mediterranean Institute of Marine and Terrestrial Biodiversity and Ecology (IMBE), Faculty of Medical and Paramedical Sciences, Aix-Marseille University, 27 boulevard Jean Moulin, 13005 Marseille, France
Interests: nanoparticles; cytotoxicity; DNA damage; oxidative stress; internalization; risk assessment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is open to valuable contributions presenting advances on the elucidation of the potential toxic effects of nanoparticles. For years, humans have been exposed—intentionally or unintentionally—to a broad range of nanoparticle-containing products. Many efforts have been made to identify the risks to which we are exposed, but concerns are still growing when it comes to dealing with nanoparticles. Moreover, nanoparticles can also affect the environment and induce effects either on aquatic or terrestrial species or on humans.

In this Special Issue, we welcome papers reporting on: i) nanoparticles’ physicochemical modifications occurring throughout their lifecycle and exerting toxic responses; ii) in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo methods to test nanoparticles toxicity; iii) improved protocols or new methods to test nanoparticles’ cytotoxicity, mutagenicity, DNA damage, oxidative stress, inflammation, and intracellular localization/quantification; and iv) mechanistic studies on the toxicological mode of action of nanoparticles.

Dr. Chiara Uboldi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanoparticles
  • physicochemical properties
  • cytotoxicity
  • DNA damage
  • oxidative stress
  • internalization
  • risk assessment
  • in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo methods

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Nickel Nanoparticles Induce the Synthesis of a Tumor-Related Polypeptide in Human Epidermal Keratinocytes
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(5), 992; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10050992 - 21 May 2020
Abstract
Although nickel allergy and carcinogenicity are well known, their molecular mechanisms are still uncertain, thus demanding studies at the molecular level. The nickel carcinogenicity is known to be dependent on the chemical form of nickel, since only certain nickel compounds can enter the [...] Read more.
Although nickel allergy and carcinogenicity are well known, their molecular mechanisms are still uncertain, thus demanding studies at the molecular level. The nickel carcinogenicity is known to be dependent on the chemical form of nickel, since only certain nickel compounds can enter the cell. This study investigates, for the first time, the cytotoxicity, cellular uptake, and molecular targets of nickel nanoparticles (NiNPs) in human skin cells in comparison with other chemical forms of nickel. The dose-response curve that was obtained for NiNPs in the cytotoxicity assays showed a linear behavior typical of genotoxic carcinogens. The exposure of keratinocytes to NiNPs leads to the release of Ni2+ ions and its accumulation in the cytosol. A 6 kDa nickel-binding molecule was found to be synthesized by cells exposed to NiNPs at a dose corresponding to medium mortality. This molecule was identified to be tumor-related p63-regulated gene 1 protein. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Toxicity of Nanoparticles)
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