Special Issue "Nano-Materials in Electrocatalyst"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Synthesis, Interfaces and Nanostructures".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Sung Mook Choi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Materials Center for Energy Department, Surface Technology Division, Korea Institute of Materials Science (KIMS), 797 Changwondaero, Sungsan-gu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 51508, Korea
Interests: mathematics; electrocatalyst wse2 nanomaterials for hydrogen evolution reaction

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Renewable energy has been recognized as a clean, nonpolluting, and unlimited energy source that can resolve global warming and environmental pollution problems caused by using fossil fuels. Renewable energy can usually be converted into other forms, such as electricity, for easy use and transportation as well as safe storage. At the time, the conversion efficiency should be increased by using the electrochemical conversion method with a nanostructured electrocatalyst. Therefore, the electrocatalyst should have high activity, long-term stability, reproducibility, and be amenable to mass production by controlling the surface morphology in addition to structural and electronic modification of nanomaterials for commercialization.

This Special Issue will especially focus on the synthesis and analysis of 0D (cluster, single atom, etc.), 1D (nanowire, nanorod, nanotube etc.), 2D (graphene, transition metal dichalcogenides, MXene, Xene, etc.), and 3D (nanoparticle, nanoflower, etc.) structured nanomaterials for electrochemical energy conversion systems such as fuel cells, water electrolysis, battery, supercapacitors, electrochemical conversion of CO2 and NH3, electrochemical chlorine evolution reaction etc., including the development of computational material design and identifying reaction mechanisms. Other topics not in the list of specified topics are also welcome if they are related to the theme of the Special Issue.

This Special Issue is open to both original research articles as well as review papers that help researchers worldwide understand the latest trends and progress in the research field encompassing “Nanomaterials in Electrocatalysts”.

Dr. Sung Mook Choi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanomaterials
  • electrocatalyst
  • renewable energy
  • electrochemical conversion

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Structural and Electrochemical Properties of Physically and Chemically Activated Carbon Nanoparticles for Supercapacitors
Nanomaterials 2022, 12(1), 122; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12010122 - 30 Dec 2021
Viewed by 427
Abstract
The demand for supercapacitors has been high during the integration of renewable energy devices into the electrical grid. Although activated carbon materials have been widely utilized as supercapacitor electrodes, the need for economic and sustainable processes to extract and activate carbon nanomaterials is [...] Read more.
The demand for supercapacitors has been high during the integration of renewable energy devices into the electrical grid. Although activated carbon materials have been widely utilized as supercapacitor electrodes, the need for economic and sustainable processes to extract and activate carbon nanomaterials is still crucial. In this work, the biomass waste of date palm fronds is converted to a hierarchical porous nanostructure of activated carbon using simple ball-milling and sonication methods. Chemical and physical activation agents of NaOH and CO2, receptively, were applied on two samples separately. Compared with the specific surface area of 603.5 m2/g for the CO2-activated carbon, the NaOH-activated carbon shows a higher specific surface area of 1011 m2/g with a finer nanostructure. Their structural and electrochemical properties are functionalized to enhance electrode–electrolyte contact, ion diffusion, charge accumulation, and redox reactions. Consequently, when used as electrodes in an H2SO4 electrolyte for supercapacitors, the NaOH-activated carbon exhibits an almost two-fold higher specific capacitance (125.9 vs. 56.8 F/g) than that of the CO2-activated carbon at the same current density of 1 A/g. Moreover, using carbon cloth as a current collector provides mechanical flexibility to our electrodes. Our practical approach produces cost-effective, eco-friendly, and flexible activated carbon electrodes with a hierarchical porous nanostructure for supercapacitor applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nano-Materials in Electrocatalyst)
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Article
Effects of Annealing Temperature on the Oxygen Evolution Reaction Activity of Copper–Cobalt Oxide Nanosheets
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(3), 657; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11030657 - 08 Mar 2021
Viewed by 871
Abstract
Developing high performance, highly stable, and low-cost electrodes for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is challenging in water electrolysis technology. However, Ir- and Ru-based OER catalysts with high OER efficiency are difficult to commercialize as precious metal-based catalysts. Therefore, the study of OER [...] Read more.
Developing high performance, highly stable, and low-cost electrodes for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is challenging in water electrolysis technology. However, Ir- and Ru-based OER catalysts with high OER efficiency are difficult to commercialize as precious metal-based catalysts. Therefore, the study of OER catalysts, which are replaced by non-precious metals and have high activity and stability, are necessary. In this study, a copper–cobalt oxide nanosheet (CCO) electrode was synthesized by the electrodeposition of copper–cobalt hydroxide (CCOH) on Ni foam followed by annealing. The CCOH was annealed at various temperatures, and the structure changed to that of CCO at temperatures above 250 °C. In addition, it was observed that the nanosheets agglomerated when annealed at 300 °C. The CCO electrode annealed at 250 °C had a high surface area and efficient electron conduction pathways as a result of the direct growth on the Ni foam. Thus, the prepared CCO electrode exhibited enhanced OER activity (1.6 V at 261 mA/cm2) compared to those of CCOH (1.6 V at 144 mA/cm2), Co3O4 (1.6 V at 39 mA/cm2), and commercial IrO2 (1.6 V at 14 mA/cm2) electrodes. The optimized catalyst also showed high activity and stability under high pH conditions, demonstrating its potential as a low cost, highly efficient OER electrode material. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nano-Materials in Electrocatalyst)
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Article
Enhanced Desalination Performance of Capacitive Deionization Using Nanoporous Carbon Derived from ZIF-67 Metal Organic Frameworks and CNTs
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(11), 2091; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10112091 - 22 Oct 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1344
Abstract
Capacitive deionization (CDI) based on ion electrosorption has recently emerged as a promising desalination technology due to its low energy consumption and environmental friendliness compared to conventional purification technologies. Carbon-based materials, including activated carbon (AC), carbon aerogel, carbon cloth, and carbon fiber, have [...] Read more.
Capacitive deionization (CDI) based on ion electrosorption has recently emerged as a promising desalination technology due to its low energy consumption and environmental friendliness compared to conventional purification technologies. Carbon-based materials, including activated carbon (AC), carbon aerogel, carbon cloth, and carbon fiber, have been mostly used in CDI electrodes due their high surface area, electrochemical stability, and abundance. However, the low electrical conductivity and non-regular pore shape and size distribution of carbon-based electrodes limits the maximization of the salt removal performance of a CDI desalination system using such electrodes. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are novel porous materials with periodic three-dimensional structures consisting of metal center and organic ligands. MOFs have received substantial attention due to their high surface area, adjustable pore size, periodical unsaturated pores of metal center, and high thermal and chemical stabilities. In this study, we have synthesized ZIF-67 using CNTs as a substrate to fully utilize the unique advantages of both MOF and nanocarbon materials. Such synthesis of ZIF-67 carbon nanostructures was confirmed by TEM, SEM, and XRD. The results showed that the 3D-connected ZIF-67 nanostructures bridging by CNTs were successfully prepared. We applied this nanostructured [email protected] to CDI electrodes for desalination. We found that the salt removal performance was significantly enhanced by 88% for 30% [email protected] electrodes as compared with pristine AC electrodes. This increase in salt removal behavior was analyzed by electrochemical analysis such as cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements, and the results indicate reduced electrical impedance and enhanced electrode capacitance in the presence of [email protected] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nano-Materials in Electrocatalyst)
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