Special Issue "Applications and Properties of Magnetic Nanoparticles"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 12 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Paolo Arosio
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Guest Editor
Physics Department, Università degli Studi di Milano and INSTM Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali - Milano Unit, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan, Italy
Interests: Magnetic multifunctional nanoparticles; Molecular magnets; Low-dimensional magnetic clusters; Magnetic highly-sensitive biosensors; Nuclear Magnetic Resonance & Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Applications of NMR in Cultural Heritage; Magnetometry; Atomic Force Microscopy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is well-known that nanomaterials are a key focus of research for wide outspread novel applications. As the size decreases to the nano-scale, the properties of materials greatly change owing to their large surface-to-volume ratio, quantum size effects and electrodynamic interactions. In the last decades a lot of research has been carried out for the synthesis, characterization and modellization of nanostructured materials for several applications, ranging from electronics and energy harvesting and storage, to biomedical applications.

In this special issue, I cordially invite front-line researchers with an interdisciplinary approach to submit original articles on exploring the use of magnetic nano-objects in a broad range of applications.

For this purpose, the Issue wants to cover the new developments in the synthesis and characterization of magnetic nanoconstructs ranging from conventional metal oxides nanoparticles to novel molecule-based or hybrid multifunctional nano-objects. At the same time, this Special Issue is intended to focus on and explore the potential of these novel magnetic nanoconstructs in Nanomedicine and Biology, in energy harvesting and storage applications, in sensing applications, in pollution remediation, in data storage and several other possible applications.

Dr. Paolo Arosio
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • magnetic nanoparticles
  • magnetic hybrid nanomaterials
  • nanomagnetism
  • magnetic nanocomposite
  • multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles
  • novel applications of magnetic nanomaterials

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Biocompatible Magnetic Fluids of Co-Doped Iron Oxide Nanoparticles with Tunable Magnetic Properties
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(6), 1019; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10061019 - 27 May 2020
Abstract
Magnetite (Fe3O4) particles with a diameter around 10 nm have a very low coercivity (Hc) and relative remnant magnetization (Mr/Ms), which is unfavorable for magnetic fluid hyperthermia. In contrast, cobalt ferrite (CoFe2 [...] Read more.
Magnetite (Fe3O4) particles with a diameter around 10 nm have a very low coercivity (Hc) and relative remnant magnetization (Mr/Ms), which is unfavorable for magnetic fluid hyperthermia. In contrast, cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) particles of the same size have a very high Hc and Mr/Ms, which is magnetically too hard to obtain suitable specific heating power (SHP) in hyperthermia. For the optimization of the magnetic properties, the Fe2+ ions of magnetite were substituted by Co2+ step by step, which results in a Co doped iron oxide inverse spinel with an adjustable Fe2+ substitution degree in the full range of pure iron oxide up to pure cobalt ferrite. The obtained magnetic nanoparticles were characterized regarding their structural and magnetic properties as well as their cell toxicity. The pure iron oxide particles showed an average size of 8 nm, which increased up to 12 nm for the cobalt ferrite. For ferrofluids containing the prepared particles, only a limited dependence of Hc and Mr/Ms on the Co content in the particles was found, which confirms a stable dispersion of the particles within the ferrofluid. For dry particles, a strong correlation between the Co content and the resulting Hc and Mr/Ms was detected. For small substitution degrees, only a slight increase in Hc was found for the increasing Co content, whereas for a substitution of more than 10% of the Fe atoms by Co, a strong linear increase in Hc and Mr/Ms was obtained. Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed predominantly Fe3+ in all samples, while also verifying an ordered magnetic structure with a low to moderate surface spin canting. Relative spectral areas of Mössbauer subspectra indicated a mainly random distribution of Co2+ ions rather than the more pronounced octahedral site-preference of bulk CoFe2O4. Cell vitality studies confirmed no increased toxicity of the Co-doped iron oxide nanoparticles compared to the pure iron oxide ones. Magnetic heating performance was confirmed to be a function of coercivity as well. The here presented non-toxic magnetic nanoparticle system enables the tuning of the magnetic properties of the particles without a remarkable change in particles size. The found heating performance is suitable for magnetic hyperthermia application. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications and Properties of Magnetic Nanoparticles)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Influence of Experimental Parameters of a Continuous Flow Process on the Properties of Very Small Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (VSION) Designed for T1-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(4), 757; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10040757 - 15 Apr 2020
Abstract
This study reports the development of a continuous flow process enabling the synthesis of very small iron oxide nanoparticles (VSION) intended for T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The influence of parameters, such as the concentration/nature of surfactants, temperature, pressure and the [...] Read more.
This study reports the development of a continuous flow process enabling the synthesis of very small iron oxide nanoparticles (VSION) intended for T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The influence of parameters, such as the concentration/nature of surfactants, temperature, pressure and the residence time on the thermal decomposition of iron(III) acetylacetonate in organic media was evaluated. As observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the diameter of the resulting nanoparticle remains constant when modifying the residence time. However, significant differences were observed in the magnetic and relaxometric studies. This continuous flow experimental setup allowed the production of VSION with high flow rates (up to 2 mL·min−1), demonstrating the efficacy of such process compared to conventional batch procedure for the scale-up production of VSION. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications and Properties of Magnetic Nanoparticles)
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Open AccessArticle
Synthesis of Magnetic Ferrite Nanoparticles with High Hyperthermia Performance via a Controlled Co-Precipitation Method
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(8), 1176; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9081176 - 16 Aug 2019
Cited by 6
Abstract
Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) that exhibit high specific loss power (SLP) at lower metal content are highly desirable for hyperthermia applications. The conventional co-precipitation process has been widely employed for the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles. However, their hyperthermia performance is often insufficient, which is [...] Read more.
Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) that exhibit high specific loss power (SLP) at lower metal content are highly desirable for hyperthermia applications. The conventional co-precipitation process has been widely employed for the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles. However, their hyperthermia performance is often insufficient, which is considered as the main challenge to the development of practicable cancer treatments. In particular, ferrite MNPs have unique properties, such as a strong magnetocrystalline anisotropy, high coercivity, and moderate saturation magnetization, however their hyperthermia performance needs to be further improved. In this study, cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) and zinc cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (ZnCoFe2O4) were prepared to achieve high SLP values by modifying the conventional co-precipitation method. Our modified method, which allows for precursor material compositions (molar ratio of Fe+3:Fe+2:Co+2/Zn+2 of 3:2:1), is a simple, environmentally friendly, and low temperature process carried out in air at a maximum temperature of 60 °C, without the need for oxidizing or coating agents. The particles produced were characterized using multiple techniques, such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV–Vis spectroscopy), and a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). SLP values of the prepared nanoparticles were carefully evaluated as a function of time, magnetic field strength (30, 40, and 50 kA m−1), and the viscosity of the medium (water and glycerol), and compared to commercial magnetic nanoparticle materials under the same conditions. The cytotoxicity of the prepared nanoparticles by in vitro culture with NIH-3T3 fibroblasts exhibited good cytocompatibility up to 0.5 mg/mL. The safety limit of magnetic field parameters for SLP was tested. It did not exceed the 5 × 109 Am−1 s−1 threshold. A saturation temperature of 45 °C could be achieved. These nanoparticles, with minimal metal content, can ideally be used for in vivo hyperthermia applications, such as cancer treatments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications and Properties of Magnetic Nanoparticles)
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Open AccessArticle
Magnetic Nanoparticles Functionalized Few-Mode-Fiber-Based Plasmonic Vector Magnetometer
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(5), 785; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9050785 - 22 May 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
In this work, we demonstrate a highly-sensitive vector magnetometer based on a few-mode-fiber-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor functionalized by magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in liquid. To fabricate the sensor, a few-mode fiber is side-polished and coated with a gold film, forming an SPR [...] Read more.
In this work, we demonstrate a highly-sensitive vector magnetometer based on a few-mode-fiber-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor functionalized by magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in liquid. To fabricate the sensor, a few-mode fiber is side-polished and coated with a gold film, forming an SPR sensor that is highly sensitive to the surrounding refractive index. The vector magnetometer operates based on the mechanism whereby the intensity and orientation of an external magnetic field alters the anisotropic aggregation of the MNPs and thus the refractive index around the fiber SPR device. This, in turn, shifts the resonance wavelength of the surface plasmon. Experimental results show the proposed sensor is very sensitive to magnetic-field intensity and orientation (0.692 nm/Oe and −11.917 nm/°, respectively). These remarkable sensitivities to both magnetic-field intensity and orientation mean that the proposed sensor can be used in applications to detect weak magnetic-field vectors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications and Properties of Magnetic Nanoparticles)
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