Special Issue "The Application of DNA Nanotechnology"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Biology and Medicines".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Silvia Hernández-Ainsa
Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Nanoscience of Aragon, University of Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza, Spain;
Institute of Material Science of Aragon (CSIC-University of Zaragoza), 50009 Zaragoza, Spain;
Aragonese Agency for Research and Development (ARAID), 50018 Zaragoza, Spain
Interests: DNA nanotechnology; Molecular self-assembly; Stimuli-responsive materials; Drug delivery; Biomimetics; Biosensors; Bioimaging; Nanomedicine

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

DNA nanotechnology is enabling the fabrication of increasingly sophisticated nanostructures. This manufacturing approach is fully programmable and reproducible as it relies on the accurate specificity of DNA base–pairing interactions. DNA sequences can therefore be rationally designed to self-assemble into constructs of well-defined dimensions, tailored shapes, and versatile functionality. Owing to this unique design adaptability, DNA nanotechnology has become a prolific source of customized nanomaterials for diverse purposes, such as drug delivery, bioimaging, single molecule detection, biomimetics, biosensing, protein scaffolding, and DNA computing. This Special Issue of Nanomaterials aims to gather exciting new contributions on this rapidly expanding research area. To this end, we invite researchers to submit original research articles, communications, and review articles covering recent advances on functional DNA-based nanostructures and their applications into different fields, including but not limited to biotechnology, biophysics, nanomedicine, and nanophotonics.

Dr. Silvia Hernández-Ainsa
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • DNA self-assembly
  • DNA nanomachines
  • Stimuli-responsive DNA nanostructures
  • Biosensors
  • Bioimaging
  • Drug delivery
  • Biomimetics
  • Nanophotonics
  • Molecular electronics
  • DNA computing

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Fast and Accurate Pneumocystis Pneumonia Diagnosis in Human Samples Using a Label-Free Plasmonic Biosensor
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(6), 1246; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10061246 - 26 Jun 2020
Abstract
Pneumocystis jirovecii is a fungus responsible for human Pneumocystis pneumonia, one of the most severe infections encountered in immunodepressed individuals. The diagnosis of Pneumocystis pneumonia continues to be challenging due to the absence of specific symptoms in infected patients. Moreover, the standard diagnostic [...] Read more.
Pneumocystis jirovecii is a fungus responsible for human Pneumocystis pneumonia, one of the most severe infections encountered in immunodepressed individuals. The diagnosis of Pneumocystis pneumonia continues to be challenging due to the absence of specific symptoms in infected patients. Moreover, the standard diagnostic method employed for its diagnosis involves mainly PCR-based techniques, which besides being highly specific and sensitive, require specialized personnel and equipment and are time-consuming. Our aim is to demonstrate an optical biosensor methodology based on surface plasmon resonance to perform such diagnostics in an efficient and decentralized scheme. The biosensor methodology employs poly-purine reverse-Hoogsteen hairpin probes for the detection of the mitochondrial large subunit ribosomal RNA (mtLSU rRNA) gene, related to P. jirovecii detection. The biosensor device performs a real-time and label-free identification of the mtLSU rRNA gene with excellent selectivity and reproducibility, achieving limits of detection of around 2.11 nM. A preliminary evaluation of clinical samples showed rapid, label-free and specific identification of P. jirovecii in human lung fluids such as bronchoalveolar lavages or nasopharyngeal aspirates. These results offer a door for the future deployment of a sensitive diagnostic tool for fast, direct and selective detection of Pneumocystis pneumonia disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Application of DNA Nanotechnology)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Bottom-Up Self-Assembly Based on DNA Nanotechnology
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(10), 2047; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10102047 - 16 Oct 2020
Abstract
Manipulating materials at the atomic scale is one of the goals of the development of chemistry and materials science, as it provides the possibility to customize material properties; however, it still remains a huge challenge. Using DNA self-assembly, materials can be controlled at [...] Read more.
Manipulating materials at the atomic scale is one of the goals of the development of chemistry and materials science, as it provides the possibility to customize material properties; however, it still remains a huge challenge. Using DNA self-assembly, materials can be controlled at the nano scale to achieve atomic- or nano-scaled fabrication. The programmability and addressability of DNA molecules can be applied to realize the self-assembly of materials from the bottom-up, which is called DNA nanotechnology. DNA nanotechnology does not focus on the biological functions of DNA molecules, but combines them into motifs, and then assembles these motifs to form ordered two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) lattices. These lattices can serve as general templates to regulate the assembly of guest materials. In this review, we introduce three typical DNA self-assembly strategies in this field and highlight the significant progress of each. We also review the application of DNA self-assembly and propose perspectives in this field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Application of DNA Nanotechnology)
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