Special Issue "Methods and Protocols in the Study of Morpho-Functional Characteristics of Human Musculoskeletal System"

A special issue of Methods and Protocols (ISSN 2409-9279). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomedical Sciences and Physiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 February 2023 | Viewed by 2304

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Giovanna Vermiglio
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Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical and Dental Sciences and Morphofunctional Imaging, University of Messina, 98125 Messina, Italy
Interests: histology; immunohistochemistry; confocal laser microscopy; cells culture; bone tissue; muscle tissue; masticatory muscles
Dr. Giuseppina Cutroneo
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Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical and Dental Sciences and Morphofunctional Imaging, University of Messina, 98125 Messina, Italy
Interests: human anatomy; immunohistochemistry; oral-facial anatomy; dental sciences; bone tissue; muscle tissue; electron microscopy
Dr. Antonio Centofanti
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Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical and Dental Sciences and Morphofunctional Imaging, University of Messina, 98125 Messina, Italy
Interests: human anatomy; oral-facial anatomy; dental sciences; bone tissue; muscle tissue; scanning electron microscopy; biomaterials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The study of morpho-functional characteristics of human musculoskeletal system has an important role in understanding the physio-pathological mechanisms of several conditions and, in turn, in planning the best therapeutic and/or surgical strategies, if necessary. The musculoskeletal system is a highly dynamic system that modifies its morpho-functional characteristics in response to the continuous stimuli to which it is subjected. Many approaches exist that allow us to obtain a lot of information about this system, but there is still a lot that is yet to be discovered, and often, the most commonly used protocols and methods are not enough to obtain the information that we need. The aim of this Special Issue is to propose new methods and protocols that allow one to obtain a variety of useful information about the behavior of bone and muscle tissues and of the extracellular matrix components, both in physiological and in pathological conditions. The data that this Special Issue aim to collect should represent new approaches in the musculoskeletal system study.  Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Imaging
  • Hypertrophy and/or atrophy
  • Biomaterials
  • Extracellular matrix remodeling
  • Histology and Immunohistochemistry
  • Molecular biology
  • Dentistry
  • Sports
  • Neuromuscular disease
  • Neurosciences

We welcome original articles, review articles and reports on these topics.

Dr. Giovanna Vermiglio
Dr. Giuseppina Cutroneo
Dr. Antonio Centofanti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Methods and Protocols is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • skeletal muscle
  • ECM
  • bone tissue
  • microscopy
  • reparative processes
  • imaging

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Hand-Carried Ultrasonography Instrumentation in the Diagnosis of Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction
Methods Protoc. 2021, 4(4), 81; https://doi.org/10.3390/mps4040081 - 06 Nov 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 989
Abstract
Internal derangement (ID) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is defined as a mechanical problem of the joint that interferes with its function. It is attributed to an abnormal interaction among the articular disc, condyle, and joint eminence. The aim of this study is [...] Read more.
Internal derangement (ID) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is defined as a mechanical problem of the joint that interferes with its function. It is attributed to an abnormal interaction among the articular disc, condyle, and joint eminence. The aim of this study is to evaluate diagnostic efficacy of non-invasive hand-carried ultrasonography instrumentation (US) to provide high-level images for a correct diagnosis of ID. Twenty-eight ID patients, 15 female and 13 males, were examined both clinically and by MRI images in order to achieve a diagnosis of ID (using Helkimo index). Then, they were submitted to US examination with a 12 MHz transducer by using hand-carried instrumentation by a clinician that was blind to their diagnosis and clinical data. TMJ US examination was performed with the mouth closed and mouth open, with proper technique. Each position was then evaluated with two different orientations of the transducer. US showed acceptable results in identifying bone structures. Lower values of diagnostic efficacy were obtained for disc position during joint movements with respect to MRI images. MRI still represents the gold standard for the identification of joint structures. If not corroborated by clinical and anamnestic data, the diagnostic efficacy of US in identifying the position of the disc during opening and closing jaw movements appears limited than compared to MRI. Full article
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Protocol
Isolation of Live Leukocytes from Human Inflammatory Muscles
Methods Protoc. 2021, 4(4), 75; https://doi.org/10.3390/mps4040075 - 16 Oct 2021
Viewed by 982
Abstract
In inflammatory myopathies, the self-reactive immune cells involved in muscle aggression have been studied mostly using histological assessment of muscle biopsy sections; this methodology provides the advantage of visualizing and identifying cells within the tissue, but it does not allow further investigation. To [...] Read more.
In inflammatory myopathies, the self-reactive immune cells involved in muscle aggression have been studied mostly using histological assessment of muscle biopsy sections; this methodology provides the advantage of visualizing and identifying cells within the tissue, but it does not allow further investigation. To gain access to live and isolated cells, many studies utilized blood samples; however, in the absence of biological tools to discriminate the leukocytes associated with the autoimmune process from those that emerged from responses against pathogens, the information observed on circulating immune cells often lacks in specificity, and thus result interpretation may prove difficult. In order to selectively retrieve self-reactive immune cells, we developed a protocol to isolate live leukocytes from human muscle biopsies, which allows for further analysis using a large range of methodologies. The protocol uses enzymatic digestion to release live leukocytes from freshly collected skeletal muscle samples, followed by filtration and separation of the leukocytes from the myocytes by density gradient centrifugation. The isolated cells can be submitted immediately to various analysis strategies to characterize ex vivo the specific cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for self-directed immune muscle aggression or may be placed in culture for expansion. Full article
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