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Special Issue "Nanochemistry: Good Beginnings for a Cross-Disciplinary Platform"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Ashok Kakkar
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, McGill University, 801 Sherbrooke St. West, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 0B8, Canada
Interests: nanostructures; soft nanoparticles; macromolecules; dendrimers; miktoarm polymers; telodendrimers, naked nanocarriers; metal nanoparticles; gold nanoshells; iron oxide nanoparticles; nanomedicine; drug delivery; diagnostics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Our understanding of events at the nanoscale has led to major breakthroughs in science and continues to be a topical area of research. The convergent approach in this field has removed traditional boundaries of different areas and has brought scientists together in the common cause of designing novel materials for a diverse range of applications. Its exemplary depiction is in the publications in the Nanochemistry section of Molecules. Nanochemistry has seen tremendous growth over the short span of its existence in Molecules. I believe that it will continue to reach new heights, thanks mainly to the excellent research contributions made by the scientific community.

In order to bring the significance of Nanochemistry more into focus, we would like to put together a Special Issue which will clearly demonstrate the cross-disciplinary nature of this field, but will also encourage both young and established minds to engage in a thought-provoking process of leaping into the future by developing our understanding of structure–property relationships. We are inviting our colleagues to make contributions to this Special Issue in the form of research articles or review articles signifying the importance and identifying key issues remaining to be resolved.

Prof. Dr. Ashok Kakkar
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanomaterials
  • nanoarchitecures
  • DNA-based nanotechnology
  • self-assembled monolayers
  • surface chemistry
  • green synthesis
  • soft nanoparticles
  • drug delivery
  • diagnostics
  • theranostics
  • nanomechanics
  • nanoplasmonics
  • nanoelectronics
  • nanocatalysis
  • nanotoxicity

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Hybrid Nanocellulose-Copper (II) Oxide as Engine Oil Additives for Tribological Behavior Improvement
Molecules 2020, 25(13), 2975; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25132975 - 28 Jun 2020
Abstract
Friction and wear are the main factors in the failure of the piston in automobile engines. The objective of this work was to improve the tribological behaviour and lubricant properties using hybrid Cellulose Nanocrystal (CNC) and Copper (II) oxide nanoparticles blended with SAE [...] Read more.
Friction and wear are the main factors in the failure of the piston in automobile engines. The objective of this work was to improve the tribological behaviour and lubricant properties using hybrid Cellulose Nanocrystal (CNC) and Copper (II) oxide nanoparticles blended with SAE 40 as a base fluid. The two-step method was used in the hybrid nanofluid preparation. Three different concentrations were prepared in a range of 0.1% to 0.5%. Kinematic viscosity and viscosity index were also identified. The friction and wear behavior were evaluated using a tribometer based on ASTM G181. The CNC-CuO nano lubricant shows a significant improvement in term of viscosity index by 44.3–47.12% while for friction, the coefficient of friction (COF) decreases by 1.5%, respectively, during high and low-speed loads (boundary regime), and 30.95% during a high-speed, and low load (mixed regime). The wear morphologies results also show that a smoother surface was obtained after using CNC-CuO nano lubricant compared to SAE 40. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanochemistry: Good Beginnings for a Cross-Disciplinary Platform)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Ceria-Containing Hybrid Multilayered Microcapsules for Enhanced Cellular Internalisation with High Radioprotection Efficiency
Molecules 2020, 25(13), 2957; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25132957 - 27 Jun 2020
Abstract
Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) are believed to be the most versatile nanozyme, showing great promise for biomedical applications. At the same time, the controlled intracellular delivery of nanoceria remains an unresolved problem. Here, we have demonstrated the radioprotective effect of polyelectrolyte microcapsules modified [...] Read more.
Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) are believed to be the most versatile nanozyme, showing great promise for biomedical applications. At the same time, the controlled intracellular delivery of nanoceria remains an unresolved problem. Here, we have demonstrated the radioprotective effect of polyelectrolyte microcapsules modified with cerium oxide nanoparticles, which provide controlled loading and intracellular release. The optimal (both safe and uptake efficient) concentrations of ceria-containing microcapsules for human mesenchymal stem cells range from 1:10 to 1:20 cell-to-capsules ratio. We have revealed the molecular mechanisms of nanoceria radioprotective action on mesenchymal stem cells by assessing the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), as well as by a detailed 96-genes expression analysis, featuring genes responsible for oxidative stress, mitochondrial metabolism, apoptosis, inflammation etc. Hybrid ceria-containing microcapsules have been shown to provide an indirect genoprotective effect, reducing the number of cytogenetic damages in irradiated cells. These findings give new insight into cerium oxide nanoparticles’ protective action for living beings against ionising radiation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanochemistry: Good Beginnings for a Cross-Disciplinary Platform)
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Open AccessArticle
PEGylated Liposomal Methyl Prednisolone Succinate does not Induce Infusion Reactions in Patients: A Correlation Between in Vitro Immunological and in Vivo Clinical Studies
Molecules 2020, 25(3), 558; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25030558 - 28 Jan 2020
Abstract
PEGylated nanomedicines are known to induce infusion reactions (IRs) that in some cases can be life-threatening. Herein, we report a case study in which a patient with rare mediastinal and intracardiac IgG4-related sclerosing disease received 8 treatments of intravenously administered PEGylated liposomal methylprednisolone-succinate [...] Read more.
PEGylated nanomedicines are known to induce infusion reactions (IRs) that in some cases can be life-threatening. Herein, we report a case study in which a patient with rare mediastinal and intracardiac IgG4-related sclerosing disease received 8 treatments of intravenously administered PEGylated liposomal methylprednisolone-succinate (NSSL-MPS). Due to the ethical requirements to reduce IRs, the patient received a cocktail of premedication including low dose of steroids, acetaminophen and H2 blockers before each infusion. The treatment was well-tolerated in that IRs, complement activation, anti-PEG antibodies and accelerated blood clearance of the PEGylated drug were not detected. Prior to the clinical study, an in vitro panel of assays utilizing blood of healthy donors was used to determine the potential of a PEGylated drug to activate complement system, elicit pro-inflammatory cytokines, damage erythrocytes and affect various components of the blood coagulation system. The overall findings of the in vitro panel were negative and correlated with the results observed in the clinical phase. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanochemistry: Good Beginnings for a Cross-Disciplinary Platform)
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