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Amphiphilic Molecules, Interfaces and Colloids

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 1682

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Physical Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Science, 1113 Sofia, Bulgaria
Interests: emulsions and foams; thin liquid films; interfacial and bulk rheology; heavy crude oil; petroleum emulsions; electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of thin film; self-assembly

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Physical Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia, Bulgaria
Interests: emulsions and foams; thin liquid films; interfacial and bulk rheology; heavy crude oil; petroleum emulsions; electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of thin film; self-assembly
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Colloids, such as emulsions, foams, sols, and gels, play an integral role in living organisms, the natural environment, resource extraction, pharmaceuticals, cleaning products, processing industries, and in almost all aspects of our everyday life. To a large extent, colloid stability and functionality are defined by the properties of interfaces between dispersed and continuous phases and by the surface forces acting at the micro- and nanoscale levels. It is the amphiphilic molecules that are capable of altering colloidal system properties, thus changing the overall system behavior. This is why a comprehensive understanding of amphiphile molecular structure and the respective interactions taking place at the interfaces ensures an effective control over colloidal system properties.

For this Special Issue, we welcome contributions which highlight the relation between amphiphile molecular structure, self-assembly in solutions, molecular arrangements at interfaces, specific interactions at micro- and nanoscale, and the properties displayed by the colloidal systems. Suitable research will span from fundamental studies on the physicochemical behavior of colloidal systems to the design of innovative solutions for practical applications.

Dr. Khristo Khristov
Dr. Plamen Tchoukov
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • emulsions
  • foams
  • sols
  • gels
  • amphiphilic molecules
  • self-assembled structures
  • phase behavior
  • surface forces
  • intermolecular forces
  • adsorption
  • rheology
  • design of functionalized colloids
  • thin liquid films

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

20 pages, 2457 KiB  
Article
Sugar-Based Surfactants: Effects of Structural Features on the Physicochemical Properties of Sugar Esters and Their Comparison to Commercial Octyl Glycosides
by Huiling Lu, Gwladys Pourceau, Benoit Briou, Anne Wadouachi, Théophile Gaudin, Isabelle Pezron and Audrey Drelich
Molecules 2024, 29(10), 2338; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules29102338 - 16 May 2024
Viewed by 259
Abstract
Two series of sugar esters with alkyl chain lengths varying from 5 to 12 carbon atoms, and with a head group consisting of glucose or galactose moieties, were synthesized. Equilibrium surface tension isotherms were measured, yielding critical micellar concentration (CMC) surface tensions at [...] Read more.
Two series of sugar esters with alkyl chain lengths varying from 5 to 12 carbon atoms, and with a head group consisting of glucose or galactose moieties, were synthesized. Equilibrium surface tension isotherms were measured, yielding critical micellar concentration (CMC) surface tensions at CMC (γcmc) and minimum areas at the air–water interface (Amin). In addition, Krafft temperatures (Tks) were measured to characterize the ability of molecules to dissolve in water, which is essential in numerous applications. As a comparison to widely used commercial sugar-based surfactants, those measurements were also carried out for four octyl d-glycosides. Impacts of the linkages between polar and lipophilic moieties, alkyl chain lengths, and the nature of the sugar head group on the measured properties were highlighted. Higher Tk and, thus, lower dissolution ability, were found for methyl 6-O-acyl-d-glucopyranosides. CMC and γcmc decreased with the alkyl chain lengths in both cases, but Amin did not appear to be influenced. Both γcmc and Amin appeared independent of the ester group orientation. Notably, alkyl (methyl α-d-glucopyranosid)uronates were found to result in noticeably lower CMC, possibly due to a closer distance between the carbonyl function and the head group. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Amphiphilic Molecules, Interfaces and Colloids)
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16 pages, 5059 KiB  
Article
Co-Assembled Supramolecular Organohydrogels of Amphiphilic Zwitterion and Polyoxometalate with Controlled Microstructures
by Peilin Wei, Yu Duan, Chen Wang, Panpan Sun and Na Sun
Molecules 2024, 29(10), 2286; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules29102286 - 12 May 2024
Viewed by 524
Abstract
The organization of modifiable and functional building components into various superstructures is of great interest due to their broad applications. Supramolecular self-assembly, based on rationally designed building blocks and appropriately utilized driving forces, is a promising and widely used strategy for constructing superstructures [...] Read more.
The organization of modifiable and functional building components into various superstructures is of great interest due to their broad applications. Supramolecular self-assembly, based on rationally designed building blocks and appropriately utilized driving forces, is a promising and widely used strategy for constructing superstructures with well-defined nanostructures and diverse morphologies across multiple length scales. In this study, two homogeneous organohydrogels with distinct appearances were constructed by simply mixing polyoxometalate (phosphomolybdic acid, HPMo) and a double-tailed zwitterionic quaternary ammonium amphiphile in a binary solvent of water and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The delicate balance between electrostatic attraction and repulsion of anionic HPMo clusters and zwitterionic structures drove them to co-assemble into homogeneous organohydrogels with diverse microstructures. Notably, the morphologies of the organohydrogels, including unilamellar vesicles, onion-like vesicles, and spherical aggregates, can be controlled by adjusting the ionic interactions between the zwitterionic amphiphiles and phosphomolybdic acid clusters. Furthermore, we observed an organohydrogel fabricated with densely stacked onion-like structures (multilamellar vesicles) consisting of more than a dozen layers at certain proportions. Additionally, the relationships between the self-assembled architectures and the intermolecular interactions among the polyoxometalate, zwitterionic amphiphile, and solvent molecules were elucidated. This study offers valuable insights into the mechanisms of polyoxometalate-zwitterionic amphiphile co-assembly, which are essential for the development of materials with specific structures and emerging functionalities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Amphiphilic Molecules, Interfaces and Colloids)
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11 pages, 514 KiB  
Article
Quantifying the Hydrophobic Effect per CF2 Moiety from Adsorption of Fluorinated Alcohols at the Water/Oil Interface
by Boyan Peychev, Dimitrinka Arabadzhieva, Ivan L. Minkov, Elena Mileva and Radomir I. Slavchov
Molecules 2024, 29(7), 1421; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules29071421 - 22 Mar 2024
Viewed by 585
Abstract
Amphiphilic fluorocarbon substances are a trending topic of research due to their wide range of applications accompanied by an alarming environmental and health impact. In order to predict their fate in the environment, use them more economically, develop new water treatment methods, etc., [...] Read more.
Amphiphilic fluorocarbon substances are a trending topic of research due to their wide range of applications accompanied by an alarming environmental and health impact. In order to predict their fate in the environment, use them more economically, develop new water treatment methods, etc., a better understanding of their physicochemical behavior is required. Their hydrophobicity in water/oil systems is particularly sensitive to one key thermodynamic parameter: the free energy of transfer of a perfluoromethylene group from oil to water. However, for the –CF2– moiety, the transfer energy values reported in the literature vary by more than ±25%. Due to the exponential relationship between this energy and the adsorption constants or the partition coefficients, such an uncertainty can lead to orders of magnitude error in the predicted distribution of fluorinated species. We address this problem by presenting an experimental determination of the hydrophobic effect of a –CF2– moiety with a greater certainty than currently available. The transfer energy is determined by measuring the interfacial tension of water|hexane for aqueous solutions of short-chained fluorotelomer alcohols. The obtained results for the free energy of transfer of a –CF2– moiety from oil to water are 1.68±0.02×RT0, 1.75±0.02×RT0, and 1.88±0.02×RT0 at 288.15 K, 293.15 K, and 303.15 K, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Amphiphilic Molecules, Interfaces and Colloids)
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