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Special Issue "Advances in Hydrogen Storage Materials for Energy Utilization"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Ewa C.E. Rönnebro
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, United States
Interests: metal hydrides; hydrogen storage materials and technologies; materials discovery; materials synthesis and characterization; reaction mechanisms; materials for metal hydride batteries; complex metal hydrides; metal borohydrides; metal hydride thermal energy storage; design of energy storage devices; scale-up of prototypes; hydrogen storage performance characterization; hydrogen permeation barriers; hydrogen getters; hydrogen effects; hydrogen embrittlement; hydride reorientation; isotope studies, phase transitions; crystal structure determination; solid state NMR; X-ray diffraction; neutron diffraction; synchrotron X-ray diffraction

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Hydrogen is the most abundant and light-weight element in the universe with the unique ability to form compounds with most elements. Hydrogen storage will be a cornerstone technology for energy utilization in the 21st century once all aspects of a hydrogen economy come together. During the past 20 years, several new classes of materials, both solid and liquid, have emerged as potential candidates for various energy applications based on hydrogen, including hydrogen storage, batteries, thermal energy storage, heating/cooling devices, thin films for smart solar collectors, smart windows, getters, and sensors. Immense advances have been made in the discovery, synthesis, and characterization of functional materials that can be used in sustainable infrastructure, including hydrogen production, storage, and delivery. Many applications require reversible reactions for hydrogen absorption/desorption at certain pressures and temperatures along with high hydrogen content, and it can be challenging to identify a material that can meet all performance requirements for a specific application, but several new strategies for materials engineering have emerged. Experimentalists and theorists have teamed up to facilitate the selection of promising materials candidates that can meet performance requirments.
Several physical phenomena have been observed with the introduction of hydrogen into a metal or metal alloy, e.g., electric, magnetic, optical, and mechanical transitions. Phase transitions occur reversibly from normal conductance to superconductivity, from metals to semiconductors or insulators, or from ferromagnetic to paramagnetic under certain pressures and temperatures. There are thus many other applications for metal hydrides, not only for hydrogen storage.
This Special Issue aims to cover recent progress and trends in the utilization of hydrogen in materials for various energy applications. Types of contributions to this Special Issue can be full research articles, short communications, and reviews focusing on recent advances in utilizing materials for hydrogen-based energy applications.

  • Hydrogen storage materials: their synthesis and characterization
    • Metal hydrides
    • Complex metal hydrides
    • Metal borohydrides, amides, and imides
    • Materials performance engineering; nanostructured materials, dopants, synthesis routes, etc.
    • Liquid organic hydrogen carriers
    • Metal organic frameworks
    • New materials
    • New reaction pathways
    • Computational advances
  • Metal hydride batteries
  • Hydride materials for thermal energy storage
  • Hydrides for smart solar collectors
  • Hydrides for sensors
  • Hydrogen getters

Dr. Ewa C.E. Rönnebro
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Portable Power Generation for Remote Areas Using Hydrogen Generated via Maleic Acid-Promoted Hydrolysis of Ammonia Borane
Molecules 2019, 24(22), 4045; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24224045 - 08 Nov 2019
Abstract
A significant drawback to ammonia borane as a hydrogen storage material is the production of ammonia gas during hydrolysis. As a possible solution, maleic acid is shown to be capable of fully promoting hydrolysis of ammonia borane while also preventing ammonia release in [...] Read more.
A significant drawback to ammonia borane as a hydrogen storage material is the production of ammonia gas during hydrolysis. As a possible solution, maleic acid is shown to be capable of fully promoting hydrolysis of ammonia borane while also preventing ammonia release in excess of single digit parts per million. The reaction is shown to be relatively insensitive towards common water contaminants, with seawater, puddle water, and synthetic urine resulting in hydrogen evolution comparable to that observed when using highly pure deionized water. A common cola beverage was also investigated as a potential water source, with results deviating from those observed when using the other water sources. The ability to use low quality water sources presents the option of acquiring water at the point of use, greatly increasing the energy density of the system during transportation. For each of the water sources being used, concentrations of ammonia in the gas products of maleic acid-promoted hydrolysis were found to be less than the lower detection limits of the employed analysis methods. Based on this reaction, a portable hydrogen reactor is reported and shown to be capable of on-demand hydrogen generation sufficient to power a proton exchange membrane fuel cell at varying loads without significant changes in system pressure. The overall power production system has substantial value in scenarios where electrical power is required but there is no access to an established electrical utility, with prime examples including disaster relief and expeditionary military operations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Hydrogen Storage Materials for Energy Utilization)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
TiVZrNb Multi-Principal-Element Alloy: Synthesis Optimization, Structural, and Hydrogen Sorption Properties
Molecules 2019, 24(15), 2799; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24152799 - 31 Jul 2019
Abstract
While the overwhelming number of papers on multi-principal-element alloys (MPEAs) focus on the mechanical and microstructural properties, there has been growing interest in these alloys as solid-state hydrogen stores. We report here the synthesis optimization, the physicochemical and the hydrogen sorption properties of [...] Read more.
While the overwhelming number of papers on multi-principal-element alloys (MPEAs) focus on the mechanical and microstructural properties, there has been growing interest in these alloys as solid-state hydrogen stores. We report here the synthesis optimization, the physicochemical and the hydrogen sorption properties of Ti0.325V0.275Zr0.125Nb0.275. This alloy was prepared by two methods, high temperature arc melting and ball milling under Ar, and crystallizes into a single-phase bcc structure. This MPEA shows a single transition from the initial bcc phase to a final bct dihydride and a maximum uptake of 1.7 H/M (2.5 wt%). Interestingly, the bct dihydride phase can be directly obtained by reactive ball milling under hydrogen pressure. The hydrogen desorption properties of the hydrides obtained by hydrogenation of the alloy prepared by arc melting or ball milling and by reactive ball milling have been compared. The best hydrogen sorption properties are shown by the material prepared by reactive ball milling. Despite a fading of the capacity for the first cycles, the reversible capacity of the latter material stabilizes around 2 wt%. To complement the experimental approach, a theoretical investigation combining a random distribution technique and first principle calculation was done to estimate the stability of the hydride. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Hydrogen Storage Materials for Energy Utilization)
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