Special Issue "Magnetic Biosensors"

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X). This special issue belongs to the section "B:Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 November 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Susana Cardoso De Freitas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
INESC-Microsistemas e Nanotecnologias (INESC-MN), 1000-029 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: spintronics; magnetic materials; thin film deposition; microfabrication; material charecterization; magnetic tunnel junctions; magnetoresistive biosensors
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Sofia Aires Martins
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
INESC-Microsistemas e Nanotecnologias (INESC-MN), 1000-029 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: molecular diagnostics; biosensors; point-of-care devices; real-time monitoring of body responses; integrated sensing solutions; innovation
Dr. Verónica C. Martins Romão
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
INESC-Microsistemas e Nanotecnologias (INESC-MN), 1000-029 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: biosensing; biomolecular recognition; DNA-chips; immuno-assays; novel bioligands; lab-on-a-chip devices

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The current demand for new clinical diagnostics has fostered the development of integrated healthcare solutions for the rapid diagnosis, monitoring and management of health conditions. Such integrated systems rely on the availability of sensors and sensing techniques compatible with low-cost fabrication methods and adaptable to different materials and functionalities such as sensing, actuation, signal processing and communication. Magnetic sensing is an established technology providing high sensitivity with tunable spatial resolution regarding the detection of magnetic signals. Magnetic sensors compatibility with standard silicon integrated circuit technology, with electronic and fluidic circuitry, as well as with a wide range of materials, including flexible substrates, have prompted the development of a new generation of biomedical devices. Indeed, over the past 10 years, a multitude of applications combining such sensing units with diagnostics have emerged in the literature, including the detection of nucleic acids, proteins and cells in point-of-care (PoC) diagnostic devices; the detection of low-frequency bio-signals, such as neuron activity, using both rigid and flexible probes; the in-situ manipulation of magnetic nanoparticles; or the fabrication of dense, packed arrays for bioimaging scanners. Accordingly, this Special Issue aims to merge these recent developments focusing on the integration of magnetic sensors with different technologies targeting smart diagnostics for health solutions. Authors are invited to contribute research papers or review articles focusing on the detection of biological molecules/cells in portable systems, integrated systems with multiple functionalities targeting the real-time monitoring of health status, precision diagnostics, high-content screens or innovative fabrication/architecture methods for the low-cost and/or large-scale production of magnetic-based bioanalytical devices.

Prof. Dr. Susana Cardoso de Freitas
Dr. Sofia Aires Martins
Dr. Verónica C. Martins Romão
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Micromachines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Magnetic biosensors
  • Lab-on-chip devices
  • Magnetic markers
  • Magnetic flow cytometry
  • Microfluidics
  • Magnetic bioimaging
  • Magnetic nanoparticles functionalization
  • Magnetic nanoparticle manipulation and trapping

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Continuous-Flow Separation and Efficient Concentration of Foodborne Bacteria from Large Volume Using Nickel Nanowire Bridge in Microfluidic Chip
Micromachines 2019, 10(10), 644; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10100644 - 25 Sep 2019
Abstract
Separation and concentration of target bacteria has become essential to sensitive and accurate detection of foodborne bacteria to ensure food safety. In this study, we developed a bacterial separation system for continuous-flow separation and efficient concentration of foodborne bacteria from large volume using [...] Read more.
Separation and concentration of target bacteria has become essential to sensitive and accurate detection of foodborne bacteria to ensure food safety. In this study, we developed a bacterial separation system for continuous-flow separation and efficient concentration of foodborne bacteria from large volume using a nickel nanowire (NiNW) bridge in the microfluidic chip. The synthesized NiNWs were first modified with the antibodies against the target bacteria and injected into the microfluidic channel to form the NiNW bridge in the presence of the external arc magnetic field. Then, the large volume of bacterial sample was continuous-flow injected to the channel, resulting in specific capture of the target bacteria by the antibodies on the NiNW bridge to form the NiNW–bacteria complexes. Finally, these complexes were flushed out of the channel and concentrated in a lower volume of buffer solution, after the magnetic field was removed. This bacterial separation system was able to separate up to 74% of target bacteria from 10 mL of bacterial sample at low concentrations of ≤102 CFU/mL in 3 h, and has the potential to separate other pathogenic bacteria from large volumes of food samples by changing the antibodies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetic Biosensors)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Manipulation of Magnetic Beads with Thin Film Microelectromagnet Traps
Micromachines 2019, 10(9), 607; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10090607 - 13 Sep 2019
Abstract
Integration of point-of-care assays can be facilitated with the use of actuated magnetic beads (MB) to perform testing in less expensive settings to enable the delivery of cost-effective care. In this paper we present six different designs of planar microelectromagnets traps (MEMT) with [...] Read more.
Integration of point-of-care assays can be facilitated with the use of actuated magnetic beads (MB) to perform testing in less expensive settings to enable the delivery of cost-effective care. In this paper we present six different designs of planar microelectromagnets traps (MEMT) with four external coils in series and one central coil connected for an opposite direction of manipulation of MB in microfluidic flows. The development of a simulation tool facilitated the rapid and efficient optimization of designs by presenting the influence of system variables on real time concentrations of MB. Real time experiments are in good agreement with the simulations and showed that the design enabled synchronous concentration and dispersion of MB on the same MEMT. The yield of local concentration is seen to be highly dependent on coil design. Additional coil turns between the central and external coils (inter-windings) doubled magnetic concentration and repulsion with no significant electrical resistance increase. The assemblage of a copper microchannel closed loop cooling system to the coils successfully eliminated the thermal drift promoted by joule heating generated by applied current. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Magnetic Biosensors)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop