Special Issue "Advances in Metal Casting Technology"

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. William D. Griffiths
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Interests: metal casting; metallurgy; heat transfer; solidification; light alloys; steel; heat treatment; lost foam casting; casting defects
Dr.-Ing. Dirk Lehmhus
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials (IFAM)
Interests: porous and cellular metals; metal foams; syntactic foams; metal matrix syntactic foams; metal matrix composites; metal casting; casting technology; powder metallurgy; powder technology; finite element analysis; integrated computational materials engineering (ICME); smart structures; sensor integration; sensorial materials; structural health monitoring (SHM)
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Ekaterina Potaturina
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
HÜTTENES-ALBERTUS Chemische Werke GmbH, Wiesenstraße 23/64, 40549 Düsseldorf, Germany
Interests: metal casting; coatings; casting defects; inorganic chemistry; refactory materials
Prof. Dr.-Ing. Sven Roeren
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Production and Logistics, Dingolfing, University of Applied Sciences Landshut, Am Lurzenhof 1, 84036 Landshut
Germany
Interests: metal casting processes; digital maintenance; casting follow up processes; logistics in foundries; performance measurement in production; balanced scorecards in production management
Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Matthias Busse
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Shaping and Functional Materials, Fraunhofer IFAM, Wiener Strasse 12, 28359 Bremen, Germany
Interests: metal casting; lost foam casting; compound casting; hybrid materials and structures; powder metallurgy; additive manufacturing; printed sensors and electronics; smart manufacturing; e-mobility

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As one of the oldest metal-based manufacturing techniques mankind has developed, casting lives on by constantly reinventing itself, optimizing the processes, materials, and properties that are achievable. The present Special Issue is meant to highlight these achievements and pinpoint future needs. Today, the casting industry faces challenges like the advent of additive manufacturing; the digitalization of industrial processes; and the introduction of electric and autonomous drive in the automotive industry, traditionally one of its main customers. In this Special Issue, we intend to contribute to the analysis of this situation and stress the industry’s response. In doing so, we will cover the full range of metal casting and its supporting technologies, from optimized component design to the simulation of materials and processes up to the prediction of microstructures and properties, from mould and core materials to advanced approaches like sensor integration or compound and hybrid castings and secondary processes like heat treatment. The SI is linked to the 2018 Lost Foam Casting international symposium (LFC 2018, Bremen, Germany, Nov. 7th/8th, 2018). Thematic foci will be

  • digitalization from production organization to smart castings
  • additive manufacturing in a metal casting context, e.g., for the production of hard tools and/or expendable patterns
  • compound, hybrid, and smart castings (e.g., sensor integration)
  • new materials for established processes (i.e., stainless lost foam)
  • modelling and simulation from a macro to a micro scale, from the casting process to microstructure evolution and property prediction

While a core of the Special Issue's contributions is meant to be sourced from LFC 2018, external submissions are explicitly invited. Specifically welcome are contributions extending the SI’s scope beyond lost foam casting, covering all areas of advanced metal casting technology as highlighted above.

The group of guest editors has deliberately been selected for coverage of both the academic and the industrial community to ensure high-quality scientific contributions with a clear focus on application requirements.

Dr. William D. Griffiths
Dr. Dirk Lehmhus
Dr. Ekaterina Potaturina
Prof. Dr.-Ing. Sven Roeren
Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Matthias Busse
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • metal casting
  • smart castings
  • sensor integration
  • compound casting
  • hybrid materials
  • hybrid manufacturing process
  • casting simulation
  • ICME
  • lost foam casting
  • digitalization

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Measurement of Metal Velocity in Sand Casting during Mold Filling
Metals 2019, 9(10), 1079; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9101079 - 06 Oct 2019
Abstract
Melt turbulence during mold filling is detrimental to the quality of sand castings. In this research study, the authors present a novel method of embedding Internet of Things (IoT) sensors to monitor real-time melt flow velocity in sand molds during metal casting. Cavities [...] Read more.
Melt turbulence during mold filling is detrimental to the quality of sand castings. In this research study, the authors present a novel method of embedding Internet of Things (IoT) sensors to monitor real-time melt flow velocity in sand molds during metal casting. Cavities are incorporated in sand molds to position the sensors with precise registration. Capacitive and magnetic sensors are embedded in the cavities where melt flow velocity is calculated by using an oscillator, the frequency of which is sensitive to changes in the close field permittivity, and change in magnetic flux, respectively. Their efficiency is investigated by integrating the sensors into 3D sand-printing (3DSP) molds for conical-helix and straight sprue configurations to measure flow velocities for aluminum alloy 319. Experimental melt flow velocities are within 5% of estimations from computational simulations. A major benefit of 3DSP is the geometrical freedom for complex gating systems necessary to reduce turbulence and access to mold volume for sensor integration during 3DSP processing. Findings from this study establish the opportunity of embedding IoT sensors in sand molds to monitor metal velocity in order to validate simulation results (2–5% error), compare gating systems performance, and improve foundry practice of manual pouring as a quality control system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Metal Casting Technology)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Final Electromagnetic Stirring Parameters on Central Cross-Sectional Carbon Concentration Distribution of High-Carbon Square Billet
Metals 2019, 9(6), 665; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9060665 - 07 Jun 2019
Abstract
The effect of final electromagnetic stirring parameters, with current intensity increasing from 300 A to 400 A and frequency increasing from 4 Hz to 12 Hz, on the electromagnetic forces and carbon concentration distribution of the central cross section of a 70 steel [...] Read more.
The effect of final electromagnetic stirring parameters, with current intensity increasing from 300 A to 400 A and frequency increasing from 4 Hz to 12 Hz, on the electromagnetic forces and carbon concentration distribution of the central cross section of a 70 steel square billet have been studied. Along the center line of the liquid core zone, current intensity of 400 A and frequency of 8 Hz achieve the maximum electromagnetic force at the position 48 mm away from the billet edge among the 10 groups of stirring parameters. Nevertheless, along diagonal of the liquid core zone, the electromagnetic force near the diagonal center is the greatest and the current intensity of 280 A and frequency of 12 Hz obtain the maximum electromagnetic force. The optimal final electromagnetic stirring (F-EMS) parameter to uniform the central cross-sectional carbon concentration and minimize the center carbon segregation of 70 steel billet was obtained with a current intensity of 280 A and frequency of 12 Hz. Under this stirring parameter, the area ratios of carbon concentrations of 0.66 wt%, 0.70 wt% and 0.74 wt% in the middle of the billet cross section reached 28.5%, 56.9% and 10.9%, respectively. Moreover, the carbon segregation indexes for all sampling points were in the range of 0.92–1.05. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Metal Casting Technology)
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Open AccessArticle
Experimental Investigation of Solidification in the Cast Mold with a Consumable Cooler Introduced Inside
Metals 2019, 9(1), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9010055 - 09 Jan 2019
Abstract
The microstructure is of great significance for the stability and mechanical performance of the cast slab. Recently, an innovative technology of feeding a consumable cooler into the mold has been proposed to improve the internal quality of castings. But the mechanism is not [...] Read more.
The microstructure is of great significance for the stability and mechanical performance of the cast slab. Recently, an innovative technology of feeding a consumable cooler into the mold has been proposed to improve the internal quality of castings. But the mechanism is not clear. In the present work, a water-cooled transparent laboratory equipment was set up and solidification of NH4Cl-70%H2O solution was studied to observe the in-situ growth and sedimentation of crystals. The experiments were conducted with and without adding a consumable cooler. Morphology variation of the solidification structure was visualized and temperature distribution during the process was recorded. Results show that introduction of the consumable cooler significantly reduces the temperature of the central zone. Melting of the consumable cooler can supply a large quantity of equiaxed crystals, which prevent the growth of columnar dendrites and thereby promote columnar to equiaxed transition (CET). Moreover, the enhanced convection shows an effect of grain refinement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Metal Casting Technology)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Functionally-graded syntactic foams produced via particle pre-compaction
Authors: T. Fiedler, L. York, S. Broxtermann, N. Movahedi
Affiliation: Univ Newcastle, Sch Engn, Callaghan, NSW 2287, Australia
Abstract: This paper introduces a novel functionally graded metallic syntactic foam. The investigated foams are manufactured using infiltration casting where molten A356 aluminium flows into the interstitial voids of expanded perlite (EP) packed particle beds. The partial pre-compaction of particle beds enables the definition of distinct and reproducible density gradients within the syntactic foam. In this study, samples are produced using four gradually increasing compaction forces and are compared to non-compacted samples. X-ray imaging is used to detect the resulting spatial variation of foam density. In addition, quasi-static compression tests are performed to determine the mechanical foam properties. The results suggest that particle pre-compaction is an efficient tool to tailor the density and mechanical properties of these novel functionally graded materials.

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