Special Issue "Advances in Joining of Automotive Alloys"

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 July 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Andreas Chrysanthou

Division of Manufacturing, Materials and Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering and Technology, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield, Herts AL10 9AB, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Metal-matrix composites; Powder metallurgy; Self-propagating High-temperature Synthesis; Joining processes; Electropulsing and Magnetic field treatment of metals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The automotive industry has identified the use of light-weighting as a response to increasing pressures to improve fuel economy and reduce emissions. Technological development by car manufacturers and materials producers has led to increasing use of aluminum and magnesium alloys. At the same time, the steel industry has responded with the development of new steels that can be used at lower gauge thickness while maintaining the strength of a vehicle. These materials may also exhibit certain advantages for use as specific components within an automotive design. One of the main challenges in the application of these materials in the automotive sector remains the ability to join them. The problem becomes even more complex when it becomes necessary to join together dissimilar materials.

This Special Issue aims to present the latest research in the wider area of automotive joining. Research articles focusing on new developments in joining of automotive alloys are welcome for consideration of publication. The techniques that may be addressed include all types of welding, adhesive bonding, mechanical fastening, processes requiring single-sided access, hybrid joining, metal-to-plastics joining, etc. Articles addressing the performance of joints (fatigue, corrosion, crashworthiness, simulation/modelling of performance), joining process selection, cost comparison of joining processes, energy use comparison, non-destructive testing of joints, repair of joints, joining for recyclability, etc., will be considered.

Prof. Dr. Andreas Chrysanthou
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Resistance spot-welding
  • MIG and TIG welding
  • Laser welding
  • Friction stir welding
  • Ultrasonic welding
  • Adhesive bonding
  • Self-piercing riveting
  • Mechanical fastening
  • Hybrid joining
  • Non-destructive testing of joints
  • Joining for recyclability

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Assessment of Self-Piercing Riveted Joints Using the Analytic Hierarchy Process
Metals 2019, 9(7), 760; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9070760
Received: 6 June 2019 / Revised: 20 June 2019 / Accepted: 2 July 2019 / Published: 6 July 2019
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Abstract
Self-piercing riveting (SPR) as a solid-state joining technology has recently found extensive applications in the automotive industry, mostly in the joining of car body aluminium sheets. To achieve an acceptable joint, key operation and tooling parameters, including set force, die profile, and rivet [...] Read more.
Self-piercing riveting (SPR) as a solid-state joining technology has recently found extensive applications in the automotive industry, mostly in the joining of car body aluminium sheets. To achieve an acceptable joint, key operation and tooling parameters, including set force, die profile, and rivet shape and hardness, should be selected appropriately. To evaluate joint performance, the interlocking parameters and joint strength have to be determined. In the current laboratory and industrial practices, joint quality is assessed according to requirements of individual applications, lacking a systematic assessment method. The goal of the present study is to develop a method to determine the SPR conditions that produce a joint of the best quality, based on an analytic hierarchy process (AHP), which is a methodology for relative measurement. A general AHP model was proposed for analysing SPR and joint performance in different conditions and with an unlimited number of criteria and alternatives. Joints of two layers of 2.5 mm thick AA6082 aluminium sheets in T6 condition were produced using various dies, rivets, and SPR processing conditions. A selection of seven joints, which achieved minimum requirements in terms of interlocking parameters and strength, was nominated for AHP assessment. With the application of six criteria, including head height, bottom thickness, minimum bottom thickness, deformed rivet diameter, shear strength, and peel strength, the AHP assessment was able to define the best conditions for the SPR joining of the aluminium alloy sheets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Joining of Automotive Alloys)
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Open AccessArticle
A Simple, Reusable and Low-Cost LVDT-Based in Situ Bolt Preload Monitoring System during Fastening for a Truck Wheel Assembly
Metals 2019, 9(3), 336; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9030336
Received: 11 February 2019 / Revised: 6 March 2019 / Accepted: 12 March 2019 / Published: 16 March 2019
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Abstract
The aim of this study is to design and test a new, simple, and reusable linear variable differential transformer (LVDT)-based in situ bolt preload monitoring system (L-PMS) during fastening of a truck wheel assembly. Instead of measuring the elongation of a bolt, the [...] Read more.
The aim of this study is to design and test a new, simple, and reusable linear variable differential transformer (LVDT)-based in situ bolt preload monitoring system (L-PMS) during fastening of a truck wheel assembly. Instead of measuring the elongation of a bolt, the distance between the end surfaces of both the bolt and nut was monitored via the L-PMS. The distance obtained from the L-PMS was experimentally correlated with the actual preload measured by a washer-type load cell. Since the variation of the distance is related to the stiffness of the bolt and clamped parts, a finite element analysis was also conducted to predict the sensitivity of L-PMS. There was a strong linear relationship between the distance and bolt preload after the bolt and nut were fully snugged. However, a logarithm-shaped nonlinear relationship was irregularly observed before getting snugged, making it difficult to define a clear relationship. In order to tackle this issue, an arc-shaped conductive line was screen-printed onto the surface of the clamped parts using a conductive carbon paste. The results show that a resistance variation of the conductive line during fastening enables to determine the snug point, so the L-PMS combined with resistance measurement results in an approximately ±6% error in the measurement of bolt preload. The proposed L-PMS offers a simple but highly reliable way for measuring bolt preload during fastening, which could be utilized in a heavy-truck production line. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Joining of Automotive Alloys)
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Open AccessArticle
Influence of Copper-Sided Tin Coating on the Weldability and Formation of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Copper-Joints
Metals 2019, 9(2), 179; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9020179
Received: 15 January 2019 / Revised: 25 January 2019 / Accepted: 30 January 2019 / Published: 2 February 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5382 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Although the joining of aluminum and copper is a difficult task, several studies have shown that friction stir welding (FSW) is capable of producing aluminum-copper-joints with excellent performance. Therefore, it is desirable to use this joining technique for the production of cost- and [...] Read more.
Although the joining of aluminum and copper is a difficult task, several studies have shown that friction stir welding (FSW) is capable of producing aluminum-copper-joints with excellent performance. Therefore, it is desirable to use this joining technique for the production of cost- and weight-reduced conductors for the automotive sector. The exposed copper contact spots in automobiles are usually coated with tin for design reasons and in order to improve their corrosion resistance. In this context, it is possible to perform the weld at first and to coat afterwards, or to weld already coated copper workpieces. Taking this into account, this paper presents results on the influence of copper-sided tinning on the joint formation as well as the achievable mechanical and electrical properties of friction stir butt welded aluminum-copper joints. Two variants were considered. The first variant included copper blanks with a tinned surface. For the second variant the surface and the abutting edge of the copper were coated. The best welds achieved excellent electrical properties and their tensile strength was only slightly reduced compared to the aluminum base material. Thus, it was shown that if these tensile strength losses are acceptable, FSW of aluminum to tin coated copper is applicable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Joining of Automotive Alloys)
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Open AccessArticle
Adaptive Resistance Spot Welding Process that Reduces the Shunting Effect for Automotive High-Strength Steels
Metals 2018, 8(10), 775; https://doi.org/10.3390/met8100775
Received: 25 August 2018 / Revised: 22 September 2018 / Accepted: 25 September 2018 / Published: 28 September 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (11077 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Although short-pitch resistance spot welding (RSW) significantly increases vehicle body strength, its application has been limited because of the associated shunting effect. In this study, a reference-based adaptive RSW process intended to minimize the shunting effect was proposed, and a related RSW system [...] Read more.
Although short-pitch resistance spot welding (RSW) significantly increases vehicle body strength, its application has been limited because of the associated shunting effect. In this study, a reference-based adaptive RSW process intended to minimize the shunting effect was proposed, and a related RSW system that controls welding current and power was developed to implement the adaptive method. The proposed RSW method compensates for the heat input loss caused by the shunting effect based on the estimated weld pitch and reference data obtained under suitable welding conditions. An exponential model was developed using a unique indicator (i.e., the ratio of the adaptive welding heat input to the reference welding heat input until the reference welding power curve peak) to estimate the weld pitch. A logistic growth model was next developed based on the relationship of the nugget diameter, heat input, and weld pitch to estimate the heat input compensation. A unique strategy using power control with a modified reference power curve was applied to supply the calculated heat input compensation. The experimental results intended to validate the proposed adaptive RSW process indicated that the proposed process effectively reduced the shunting effect and produced an improved nugget shape relative to the conventional RSW process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Joining of Automotive Alloys)
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