Special Issue "Regulation of Immunity and Inflammation by Immunometabolites and Metabolic Enzymes"

A special issue of Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989). This special issue belongs to the section "Cell Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Stefano Angiari
Website
Guest Editor
School of Biochemistry and Immunology, Trinity Biomedical Sciences; Institute, Trinity College Dublin, 152–160 Pearse Street, Dublin D02 R590, Ireland
Interests: immunometabolism; inflammation; autoimmunity; T cell biology
Dr. Jan Van den Bossche
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Molecular Cell Biology and Immunology, Amsterdam UMC, 1081 HZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Interests: immunometabolism; macrophage biology; innate immunity
Dr. Stanley Huang
Website
Guest Editor
CASE School of Medicine, 2103 Cornell Road, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
Interests: Innate immunity; Macrophages; Innate lymphoid cells; Immunometabolism
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Luke O'Neill
Website
Guest Editor
School of Biochemistry and Immunology, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland
Interests: immunometabolism, inflammation, innate immunity, inflammasomes, signalling in immune cells

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Immunology and metabolism have long been viewed as two very distinct fields with minimal or no overlap. However, over the past decade, a fast-growing number of high-impact papers highlighted the intricate link between immune cell metabolism and function. The activation and effector functions of adaptive and innate immune cells are indeed governed by the engagement and modulation of specific intracellular metabolic pathways. Systemic metabolic cues and dysfunctions can also influence how immune cells work, supporting the concept that metabolism and inflammation are tightly connected. For example, metabolites are much more than intermediate or end products of metabolism. We now know that “immunometabolites” like succinate, itaconate, acetyl-CoA, and 2-hydroxyglutarate serve as signal transducers that regulate immune cell function and disease outcome. Moreover, metabolic enzymes such as glyceraldehyde-3-phospahte dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and pyruvate kinase (PK) do much more than converting one metabolite into another.

The scope of this Special Issue will be to update our current knowledge on how metabolites and metabolic enzymes can modulate immunity and inflammation. We welcome high-quality original research articles, as well as reviews and perspectives, that provide new mechanistic insight into the metabolic regulation of immune cells (macrophages, dendritic cells, monocytes, granulocytes, T cells, NK cells, B cells, etc.), and how this affects health and disease. Manuscripts describing new methods developed to investigate metabolite-mediated signalling pathways and the non-canonical role of metabolic enzymes in inflammation are also welcome.

Dr. Stefano Angiari
Dr. Jan Van den Bossche
Dr. Stanley Huang
Prof. Luke O'Neill
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metabolites is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • immunometabolism
  • immunometabolites
  • metabolic reprogramming
  • metabolism
  • immune cell heterogeneity and plasticity
  • signalling
  • inflammation
  • immunomodulation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Involvement of Lactate and Pyruvate in the Anti-Inflammatory Effects Exerted by Voluntary Activation of the Sympathetic Nervous System
Metabolites 2020, 10(4), 148; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo10040148 - 10 Apr 2020
Abstract
We recently demonstrated that the sympathetic nervous system can be voluntarily activated following a training program consisting of cold exposure, breathing exercises, and meditation. This resulted in profound attenuation of the systemic inflammatory response elicited by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration. Herein, we assessed whether [...] Read more.
We recently demonstrated that the sympathetic nervous system can be voluntarily activated following a training program consisting of cold exposure, breathing exercises, and meditation. This resulted in profound attenuation of the systemic inflammatory response elicited by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration. Herein, we assessed whether this training program affects the plasma metabolome and if these changes are linked to the immunomodulatory effects observed. A total of 224 metabolites were identified in plasma obtained from 24 healthy male volunteers at six timepoints, of which 98 were significantly altered following LPS administration. Effects of the training program were most prominent shortly after initiation of the acquired breathing exercises but prior to LPS administration, and point towards increased activation of the Cori cycle. Elevated concentrations of lactate and pyruvate in trained individuals correlated with enhanced levels of anti-inflammatory interleukin (IL)-10. In vitro validation experiments revealed that co-incubation with lactate and pyruvate enhances IL-10 production and attenuates the release of pro-inflammatory IL-1β and IL-6 by LPS-stimulated leukocytes. Our results demonstrate that practicing the breathing exercises acquired during the training program results in increased activity of the Cori cycle. Furthermore, this work uncovers an important role of lactate and pyruvate in the anti-inflammatory phenotype observed in trained subjects. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Regulatory T Cell Metabolism in Atherosclerosis
Metabolites 2020, 10(7), 279; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo10070279 - 08 Jul 2020
Abstract
Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are capable of suppressing excessive immune responses to prevent autoimmunity and chronic inflammation. Decreased numbers of Tregs and impaired suppressive function are associated with the progression of atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall and the leading [...] Read more.
Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are capable of suppressing excessive immune responses to prevent autoimmunity and chronic inflammation. Decreased numbers of Tregs and impaired suppressive function are associated with the progression of atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall and the leading cause of cardiovascular disease. Therefore, therapeutic strategies to improve Treg number or function could be beneficial to preventing atherosclerotic disease development. A growing body of evidence shows that intracellular metabolism of Tregs is a key regulator of their proliferation, suppressive function, and stability. Here we evaluate the role of Tregs in atherosclerosis, their metabolic regulation, and the links between their metabolism and atherosclerosis. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Metabolomic profiling reveals distinct and interactive effects of diet and inflammation in shaping systemic metabolism in LDLR -/- mice

Authors: Mario A. Lauterbach, Anette Christ and Eicke Latz

Abstract: Changes in modern dietary habits such as consumption of western type diets affect physiology on several levels including metabolism, inflammation and the gut microbiome. It is currently unclear whether changes in systemic metabolism due to dietary interventions are of long-lasting nature and how they potentially affect acute inflammatory processes. Here we investigated how western diet (WD) feeding altered systemic metabolism and the metabolomic response to innate immune stimuli. We conducted metabolomic profiling of sera collected from LDLR-/- mice on either normal chow diet (ND) or WD and after a low-dose LPS challenge. WD feeding as well as LPS treatment by themselves elicited pronounced metabolic changes. LPS-induced responses were largely comparable between ND and WD fed groups, yet dynamics differed for several metabolites, including fatty acids and N-acyl amides. In previous studies WD induced epigenetic adaptations and changed responsiveness to innate stimuli in myeloid cells. To investigate whether these are sustained by long-term alterations in systemic metabolism mice fed a WD were shifted back to ND after 4 weeks (WD>ND). When shifted back to ND, serum metabolites identified to be increased upon WD feeding returned to baseline levels. Similarly the metabolic responses to LPS in ND and WD>ND groups resembled each other.

 

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