Disability and Public Health: The Importance of Physical Activity and Sport for All

A special issue of Medicina (ISSN 1648-9144). This special issue belongs to the section "Sports Medicine and Sports Traumatology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 1637

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Movement and Wellness Sciences, Parthenope University, Naples, Italy
Interests: exercise-induced asthma; nutrition; brain; sport science
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Movement and Wellness Sciences, University of Naples “Parthenope”, Naples, Italy
Interests: health innovation; public health; social marketing; sport management
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sport plays a crucial role in our physical, mental and social development. It enables us to deepen our knowledge of our own body, our potential, and our limitations, but also to rediscover our own dignity as a human and person in society. In particular, sport is a fundamental element for people with disabilities as it is an opportunity for growth and training, enabling individuals to achieve inner well-being. Implementing physical activity and sports programs in therapy is certainly beneficial both physically and psychologically. In fact, practicing sport helps to regain one's autonomy, realize oneself at a social level and recover mobility. These activities strengthen self-esteem, and possess value as a path to rehabilitation. For a disabled person, regular sports activity has the following advantages: it improves physical qualities; enhances cognitive and psychic aspects; and develops socio-relational skills.

This Special Issue, entitled "Disability and Public Health: The Importance of Physical Activity and Sport for All", intends to collect contributions capable of critically framing the problem, suggesting appropriate methodological strategies and innovative solutions that aim to legitimize the meaning and role of good practices, from the perspective of inclusive motor and sports practice.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Chronic disease and health promotion;
  • The power of sport as a transformative tool;
  • Sport and inclusion;
  • Health and social inclusion;
  • Disability and sport management;
  • Adapted sport and children;
  • Adapted sport and adult.

Prof. Dr. Domenico Tafuri
Dr. Patrizia Belfiore
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Medicina is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • chronic disease and health promotion
  • the power of sport as a transformative tool
  • sport and inclusion
  • health and social inclusion
  • disability and sport management
  • adapted sport and children
  • adapted sport and adult

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

16 pages, 826 KiB  
Review
Physical Activity and Cognitive Functioning
by Francesca Latino and Francesco Tafuri
Medicina 2024, 60(2), 216; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina60020216 - 26 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1219
Abstract
Neuroscience applied to motor activity is a growing area that aims to understand the effects of motor activity on the structures and functions of the Central Nervous System. Attention has been paid to this multidisciplinary field of investigation by the scientific community both [...] Read more.
Neuroscience applied to motor activity is a growing area that aims to understand the effects of motor activity on the structures and functions of the Central Nervous System. Attention has been paid to this multidisciplinary field of investigation by the scientific community both because it is of great importance in the treatment of many chronic diseases and because of its potential applications in the Movement Sciences. Motor activity during a developmental age is, in fact, an indispensable tool for the physical and mental growth of children, both able-bodied and disabled. Through movement, individuals can improve their physical efficiency and promote their own better health, establish relationships with the environment and others, express themselves and their emotions, form their identity and develop cognitive processes. This literature review aims, therefore, to highlight how an adequate practice of motor activity offers extraordinary possibilities for everyone in relation to learning, from the perspective of an integral development of the person, and, consequently, can raise the awareness of those involved in the training and growth, especially the youngest, towards the educational value of motor and sports activities. According to this review, and in line with the modern neuroscientific approach toward the relationships between motor activities and cognitive functions, it is possible to claim that hypokinesia tends to inhibit learning. Therefore, it now seems more topical than ever to draw attention to the need to introduce working proposals that integrate brain-based motor activity programs into the school curriculum. Full article
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