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Special Issue "Reliability of Structural Integrity and Engineering Materials"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Manufacturing Processes and Systems".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 December 2021) | Viewed by 5650

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Jae Hyuk Lim
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Jeonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju-si, Jeollabuk-do 54896, Korea
Interests: mechanics of composite materials and structures; finite element methods; deployable structures; shock-absorbing structures
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Jin Weon Kim
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, 309 Pilmun-daero, Dong-gu, Gwangju 61452, Korea
Interests: mechanical property of materials; fatigue and fracture evaluation; aging management of nuclear materials; integrity evaluation of nuclear components
Prof. Dr. Jaesool Shim
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Mechanical Engineering, Yeungnam University, 214-1 Dae-dong Gyeongsan-si, Gyeongsangbuk-do 712-749, Korea
Interests: reliability of mechanical components; nano/MEMS applications; hydrogen generation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Research on the reliability of structural integrity and engineering materials is now receiving significant attention from industries such as electronics, automotive, aerospace, marine, defense, heavy-chemical industries, and power plants. The international competitiveness of the industries in a globalized economy is closely tied to the high reliability of structural integrity and engineering materials.

To this end, this Special Issue aims to demonstrate the latest reliability evaluation of material properties and mechanical components, fabrication and testing technologies of advanced materials, NDE, nano/MEMS applications, hydrogen generation, mechanics of composite, and other related topics.

Prof. Dr. Jae Hyuk Lim
Prof. Dr. Jin Weon Kim
Prof. Dr. Jaesool Shim
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • reliability of material properties and mechanical components
  • fabrication and testing technologies of advanced materials
  • NDE
  • nano/MEMS applications
  • hydrogen generation
  • mechanics of composites
  • stress analysis
  • deployable structures
  • shock-absorbing structures

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Article
Effect of Phase Transformations on Scanning Strategy in WAAM Fabrication
Materials 2021, 14(24), 7871; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14247871 - 19 Dec 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 696
Abstract
Due to its high production rates and low cost as compared to other metal additive manufacturing processes, wire arc additive manufacturing (WAAM) has become an emerging technology in the manufacturing industry. However, the residual stress generation and part distortion hinder its widespread adoption [...] Read more.
Due to its high production rates and low cost as compared to other metal additive manufacturing processes, wire arc additive manufacturing (WAAM) has become an emerging technology in the manufacturing industry. However, the residual stress generation and part distortion hinder its widespread adoption because of the complex thermal build-histories of WAAM parts. One of the ways to alleviate this problem is to consider the effects of scan strategies as it directly influences the thermal history of the built part. Since WAAM itself is an evolved welding process and even though it is evident from welding studies that phase transformations directly affect the residual stresses in welded parts, it remains unclear how the consideration of phase transformations for different scan strategies will affect the residual stresses and distortions in the WAAMed parts. A FEM study has been performed to elucidate the effects of phase transformations on residual stresses and the distortion for different deposition patterns. The current findings highlight that for the fabrication of low-carbon martensitic steels: The consideration of phase transformations for line-type discontinuous patterns (alternate and raster) do not significantly affect the residual stresses. Consideration of phase transformations significantly affects residual stresses for continuous patterns (zigzag, in–out and out–in). To accurately simulate complex patterns, phase transformations should be considered because the patterns directly influence the temperature history of the built part and will thus affect the phase transformations, the residual stresses and the warpage. During the fabrication of WAAM parts, whenever possible, discontinuous line scanning patterns should be considered as they provide the part with uniform residual stress and distortion. The alternate line pattern has been found to be the most consistent overall pattern. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reliability of Structural Integrity and Engineering Materials)
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Article
A Phase-Field Study of Microstructure Evolution in Tungsten Polycrystalline under He/D Irradiation
Materials 2021, 14(23), 7433; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14237433 - 03 Dec 2021
Viewed by 521
Abstract
Analyses in the present study focus on understanding the evolution of the tungsten microstructure under He/D irradiation. A fractal dimension analysis was utilized to characterize the structural pattern of the microstructure irradiated by both low (10–80 eV) and high (8–30 keV) irradiation energy. [...] Read more.
Analyses in the present study focus on understanding the evolution of the tungsten microstructure under He/D irradiation. A fractal dimension analysis was utilized to characterize the structural pattern of the microstructure irradiated by both low (10–80 eV) and high (8–30 keV) irradiation energy. All examined W microstructures show a direct correlation between the fractal dimension and irradiation energy. Analyses establish an empirical relation expressing a change in the microstructure as a function of the irradiation energy based on the changes in the fractal dimension of the microstructures. The proposed relation was implemented in the phase-field model formulation with an account of the interfacial energy induced by the crystallographic mismatch between grains under irradiation. The current phase-field model captures the evolution of the void under irradiation, including nucleation and the growth of voids, and sink efficiency for vacancy annihilation in the vicinity of grain boundaries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reliability of Structural Integrity and Engineering Materials)
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Article
Hydrogen Absorption and Desorption Behavior on Aluminum-Coated Hot-Stamped Boron Steel during Hot Press Forming and Automotive Manufacturing Processes
Materials 2021, 14(21), 6730; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14216730 - 08 Nov 2021
Viewed by 577
Abstract
Our study mainly focused on diffusible hydrogen in aluminum–silicon-coated hot-stamped boron steel during a hot press forming process and in pre-treatment sequential lines of the automotive manufacturing process using a thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) technique. First, in the hot stamping procedure, as the [...] Read more.
Our study mainly focused on diffusible hydrogen in aluminum–silicon-coated hot-stamped boron steel during a hot press forming process and in pre-treatment sequential lines of the automotive manufacturing process using a thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) technique. First, in the hot stamping procedure, as the soaking time increased in the heating furnace at a specific dew point when austenitizing, a high concentration of diffusible hydrogen was absorbed into the hot-stamped boron steel. Based on the TDS analysis of hydrogen absorbed from hot stamping, the activation energy value of hydrogen trapping in 1.8 GPa grade steel is lower than that of 1.5 GPa grade steel. This means that diffusible hydrogen can be more easily diffused into defective sites of the microstructure at a higher level of the tensile strength grade. Second, in sequential pre-treatment lines of the automotive manufacturing process, additional hydrogen did not flow into the surface, and an electro-deposition process, including a baking procedure, was effective in removing diffusible hydrogen, which was similar to the residual hydrogen of the as-received state (i.e., initial cold rolled blank). Based on these results, the hydrogen absorption was facilitated during hot press forming, but the hydrogen was sequentially desorbed during automotive sequential lines on aluminum-coated hot-stamped steel parts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reliability of Structural Integrity and Engineering Materials)
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Article
Analytical Model and Numerical Analysis of Composite Wrap System Applied to Steel Pipeline
Materials 2021, 14(21), 6393; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14216393 - 25 Oct 2021
Viewed by 546
Abstract
Composite overwraps are a cost-effective repair technology, appropriate for corrosion defects, dents, and gouges for both onshore and offshore steel pipelines. The main benefit of polymer-based sleeves is safe installation without taking the pipeline out of service. This paper presents a new calculation [...] Read more.
Composite overwraps are a cost-effective repair technology, appropriate for corrosion defects, dents, and gouges for both onshore and offshore steel pipelines. The main benefit of polymer-based sleeves is safe installation without taking the pipeline out of service. This paper presents a new calculation procedure proposed in the form of an algorithm for the sizing of composite repairs of corroded pipelines when the sleeve is applied at zero internal pressure. The main objective of the presented methodology is determination of the effective thickness of the composite repair without its overestimation or underestimation. The authors used a non-linear finite element method with constitutive models allowing analysis of the steel, putty, and composite structures. The validation of the results of numerical computations compared to the experimental ones showed an appropriate agreement. The numerical calculations were applied to compare the analytical results in relation to those obtained by the standards ASME PCC-2 or ISO/TS 24817. The comparison showed that the proposed solution confirmed its effectiveness in reducing the thickness of the sleeve significantly, thus, showing that the current industrial standards provide a considerably excessive composite wrap around the steel pipe corroded area, which leads to an unnecessary increase in the repair costs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reliability of Structural Integrity and Engineering Materials)
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Article
Effect of Defects on Progressive Failure Behavior of Plain Weave Textile Composites
Materials 2021, 14(16), 4363; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14164363 - 04 Aug 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 618
Abstract
Various types of internal defects occur during manufacturing and handling of composite materials. It is practically impossible to manufacture composite structures without defects, making it crucial to understand the effect of defects on their failure behavior to maintain structural safety. In this work, [...] Read more.
Various types of internal defects occur during manufacturing and handling of composite materials. It is practically impossible to manufacture composite structures without defects, making it crucial to understand the effect of defects on their failure behavior to maintain structural safety. In this work, the effect of pre-defects on the failure behavior of plain weave textile composites was studied. Unit cell configurations with symmetric, in-phase, and shifted fiber tow arrangements were considered. Inter-laced warp and fill tows and matrix pockets of plain weave unit cells were modeled in three-dimensional finite elements, and cohesive elements were inserted between all bulk elements to account for the fracture modes of the fiber and matrix direction failure of warp and fill tows, matrix pocket failure, and interface failure. Unit cell models containing pre-defects of voids, tow-matrix pocket separation, warp-fill tow separation, and cracks in the warp and fill tows were analyzed, and their effects on progressive failure behavior were investigated in terms of the interaction between fiber tow arrangements and defects. Results indicated that initial failure occurred in matrix-direction failure mode in fill tows, whereas fiber tow-matrix pocket separation was the major failure mode under uniaxial tensile load. Furthermore, failure behavior was found to be highly dependent on the fiber tow arrangement pattern and the location of pre-defects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reliability of Structural Integrity and Engineering Materials)
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Article
Assessment of Operational Degradation of Pipeline Steels
Materials 2021, 14(12), 3247; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14123247 - 12 Jun 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 795
Abstract
This paper summarizes a series of the authors’ research in the field of assessing the operational degradation of oil and gas transit pipeline steels. Both mechanical and electrochemical properties of steels are deteriorated after operation, as is their resistance to environmentally-assisted cracking. The [...] Read more.
This paper summarizes a series of the authors’ research in the field of assessing the operational degradation of oil and gas transit pipeline steels. Both mechanical and electrochemical properties of steels are deteriorated after operation, as is their resistance to environmentally-assisted cracking. The characteristics of resistance to brittle fracture and stress corrosion cracking decrease most intensively, which is associated with a development of in-bulk dissipated microdamages of the material. The most sensitive indicators of changes in the material’s state caused by degradation are impact toughness and fracture toughness by the J-integral method. The degradation degree of pipeline steels can also be evaluated nondestructively based on in-service changes in their polarization resistance and potential of the fracture surface. Attention is drawn to hydrogenation of a pipe wall from inside as a result of the electrochemical interaction of pipe metal with condensed moisture, which facilitates operational degradation of steel due to the combined action of operating stresses and hydrogen. The development of microdamages along steel texture was evidenced metallographically as a trend to the selective etching of boundaries between adjacent bands of ferrite and pearlite and fractographically by revealing brittle fracture elements on the fracture surfaces, namely delamination and cleavage, indicating the sites of cohesion weakening between ferrite and pearlite bands. The state of the X52 steel in its initial state and after use for 30 years was assessed based on the numerical simulation method. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reliability of Structural Integrity and Engineering Materials)
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Article
Ductile-to-Brittle Transition and Brittle Fracture Stress of Ultrafine-Grained Low-Carbon Steel
Materials 2021, 14(7), 1634; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14071634 - 26 Mar 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 895
Abstract
Ductile-to-brittle transition (DBT) temperature and brittle fracture stress, σF, are important toughness criteria for structural materials. In this paper, low-carbon steels with an ultrafine elongated grain (UFEG) structure (transverse grain size 1.2 μm) and with two ferrite (α)-pearlite structure [...] Read more.
Ductile-to-brittle transition (DBT) temperature and brittle fracture stress, σF, are important toughness criteria for structural materials. In this paper, low-carbon steels with an ultrafine elongated grain (UFEG) structure (transverse grain size 1.2 μm) and with two ferrite (α)-pearlite structure with grain sizes 10 µm and 18 µm were prepared. The UFEG steel was fabricated using multipass warm biaxial rolling. The tensile tests with a cylindrical specimen and three-point bending tests with a single-edge-notched specimen were performed at −196 °C. The local stress near the notch was quantitatively calculated via finite element analysis (FEA). The σF for each sample was quantified based on the experimental results and FEA. The relationship between σF and dα in the wide range of 1.0 μm to 138 μm was plotted, including data from past literature. Finally, the conditions of grain size and temperature that cause DBT fracture in low-carbon steel were shown via the stress−d−1/2 map. The results quantitatively showed the superiority of α grain size for brittle fracture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reliability of Structural Integrity and Engineering Materials)
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