Special Issue "Fluorescent Probes for Imaging and Detection"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Assist. Prof. Kim Dokyoung
Website
Guest Editor
*Department of Biomedical Sciences, Graduate School, **Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea
Interests: innovating chemical tools design for disease diagnosis and bioimaging; innovating novel nanoformulations for drug delivery systems; biomarker sensing materials and platform; fluorescent materials; porous silicon materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is my pleasure to introduce a new Special Issue, titled “Fluorescent Probes for Imaging and Detection”, which will be published in Materials, an interdisciplinary journal dedicated to covering leading research and developments in the field of materials science and engineering. This Special Issue encompasses the field of fluorescent probes and its applications based on organic/inorganic/nano-/hybrid materials. Potential topics include but are not limited to the following: Fluorescent probes/sensors; fluorescent sensing principles and mechanisms; analytical chemistry; fluorophores; fluorescent materials; one photon/two-photon excitable probes; fluorescent detection and sensing; and biomedical applications.

Please consider this invitation to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue. Full papers, communications, and reviews are all welcome.

Prof. Kim Dokyoung
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fluorescent probe
  • bioimaging
  • sensors
  • fluorescence detection
  • fluorescent materials
  • fluorophore
  • two-photon

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Expanding NIST Calibration of Fluorescent Microspheres for Flow Cytometry to More Fluorescence Channels and Smaller Particles
Materials 2020, 13(18), 4111; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13184111 - 16 Sep 2020
Abstract
The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and other industry stakeholders have been working together to enable fluorescence intensities of flow cytometer calibration beads to be assigned quantitative equivalent reference fluorophore (ERF) values with high accuracy [...] Read more.
The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and other industry stakeholders have been working together to enable fluorescence intensities of flow cytometer calibration beads to be assigned quantitative equivalent reference fluorophore (ERF) values with high accuracy and precision. The ultimate goal of this effort is to accurately quantify the number of antibodies bound to individual living cells. The expansion of this effort to assign ERF values to more than 50 fluorescence channels and particles with diameters ranging from 10 μm down to 80 nm is reported here. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorescent Probes for Imaging and Detection)
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Open AccessCommunication
Articulated Structures of D-A Type Dipolar Dye with AIEgen: Synthesis, Photophysical Properties, and Applications
Materials 2020, 13(8), 1939; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13081939 - 20 Apr 2020
Abstract
Articulated structures of naphthalene-based donor (D)-acceptor (A) type dipolar dye and aggregation-induced emission luminogen (AIEgen) based on tetraphenylethylene (TPE) were synthesized, and their photophysical properties were analyzed for the first time. There are many fluorophore backbones, which have dipolar structure and AIEgen. However, [...] Read more.
Articulated structures of naphthalene-based donor (D)-acceptor (A) type dipolar dye and aggregation-induced emission luminogen (AIEgen) based on tetraphenylethylene (TPE) were synthesized, and their photophysical properties were analyzed for the first time. There are many fluorophore backbones, which have dipolar structure and AIEgen. However, there has been neither property analysis nor research that closely articulates DA and AIE through non-conjugation linker. We have therefore prepared two representative fluorophores; DA-AIE series (DA-AIE-M and DA-AIE-D), and characterized their UV/vis absorption and emission properties with quantum chemical calculations. In addition, we utilized the unique photophysical properties of DA-AIE-D for monitoring a trace of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in aqueous media, including real water samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorescent Probes for Imaging and Detection)
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Open AccessArticle
Highly Fluorescent Distyrylnaphthalene Derivatives as a Tool for Visualization of Cellular Membranes
Materials 2020, 13(4), 951; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13040951 - 20 Feb 2020
Abstract
Fluorescent imaging, which is an important interdisciplinary field bridging research from organic chemistry, biochemistry and cell biology has been applied for multi-dimensional detection, visualization and characterization of biological structures and processes. Especially valuable is the possibility to monitor cellular processes in real time [...] Read more.
Fluorescent imaging, which is an important interdisciplinary field bridging research from organic chemistry, biochemistry and cell biology has been applied for multi-dimensional detection, visualization and characterization of biological structures and processes. Especially valuable is the possibility to monitor cellular processes in real time using fluorescent probes. In this work, conjugated oligoelectrolytes and neutral derivatives with the distyrylnaphthalene core (SN-COEs) were designed, synthetized and tested for biological properties as membrane-specific fluorescent dyes for the visualization of membrane-dependent cellular processes. The group of tested compounds includes newly synthesized distyrylnaphthalene derivatives (DSNNs): a trimethylammonium derivative (DSNN-NMe3+), a phosphonate derivative (DSNN-P), a morpholine derivative (DSNN-Mor), a dihydroxyethylamine derivative (DSNN-DEA), a phosphonate potassium salt (DSNN-POK), an amino derivative (DSNN-NH2) and pyridinium derivative (DSNN-Py+). All compounds were tested for their biological properties, including cytotoxicity and staining efficiency towards mammalian cells. The fluorescence intensity of SN-COEs incorporated into cellular structures was analyzed by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The cytotoxicity results have shown that all tested SN-COEs can be safely used in the human and animal cell studies. Fluorescence and confocal microscopy observations confirm that tested COEs can be applied as fluorescent probes for the visualization of intracellular membrane components in a wide range of different cell types, including adherent and suspension cells. The staining procedure may be performed under both serum free and complete medium conditions. The presented studies have revealed the interesting biological properties of SN-COEs and confirmed their applicability as dyes for staining the membranous structures of eukaryotic cells, which may be useful for visualization of wide range of biological processes dependent of the extra-/intracellular communications and/or based on the remodeling of cellular membranes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorescent Probes for Imaging and Detection)
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Open AccessFeature PaperCommunication
A BODIPY-Based Fluorogenic Probe for Specific Imaging of Lipid Droplets
Materials 2020, 13(3), 677; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13030677 - 03 Feb 2020
Cited by 3
Abstract
We developed an easily accessible boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY)-based fluorogenic probe, which we named LD-TB. This probe emits bright fluorescence in oil; when compared with aqueous solution, a significant enhancement of fluorescence brightness is observed. Cellular experiments confirmed that the probe stains the lipid droplets [...] Read more.
We developed an easily accessible boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY)-based fluorogenic probe, which we named LD-TB. This probe emits bright fluorescence in oil; when compared with aqueous solution, a significant enhancement of fluorescence brightness is observed. Cellular experiments confirmed that the probe stains the lipid droplets (LDs) specifically in both live and fixed cells, providing background-free images. Compared with Nile Red dye, a commonly used LD marker, LD-TB showed superior photostability. The sharp absorption and emission bands enable its multicolor imaging with blue and green probes. Importantly, the probe has proved to have low toxicity and is compatible with cell fixation. Our research provides a promising new fluorogenic probe for specific imaging of LDs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorescent Probes for Imaging and Detection)
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Open AccessArticle
Application of Boroisoquinoline Fluorophores as Chemodosimeters for Fluoride Ion and Pd (0)
Materials 2020, 13(1), 199; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13010199 - 02 Jan 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The development of novel chemodosimeters is currently a prosperous field in organic chemistry. Recently, a new family of fluorophores, the boroisoquinolines, were introduced with satisfying photophysical properties. As a continuation of this research, the application of boroisoquinolines is presented as chemodosimeters for fluoride [...] Read more.
The development of novel chemodosimeters is currently a prosperous field in organic chemistry. Recently, a new family of fluorophores, the boroisoquinolines, were introduced with satisfying photophysical properties. As a continuation of this research, the application of boroisoquinolines is presented as chemodosimeters for fluoride anion and Pd (0). The new tools showed good selectivity for the detection of the analytes. Moreover, the mechanism of action was investigated experimentally. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorescent Probes for Imaging and Detection)
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Open AccessCommunication
A Selective Fluorescence Turn-On Probe for the Detection of DCNP (Nerve Agent Tabun Simulant)
Materials 2019, 12(18), 2943; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12182943 - 11 Sep 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Diethylcyanophosphonate (DCNP) is a simulant of Tabun (GA) which is an extremely toxic chemical substance and is used as a chemical warfare (CW) nerve agent. Due to its toxic properties, monitoring methods have been constantly come under the spotlight. What we are proposing [...] Read more.
Diethylcyanophosphonate (DCNP) is a simulant of Tabun (GA) which is an extremely toxic chemical substance and is used as a chemical warfare (CW) nerve agent. Due to its toxic properties, monitoring methods have been constantly come under the spotlight. What we are proposing within this report is a next-generation fluorescent probe, DMHN1, which allows DCNP to become fully traceable in a sensitive, selective, and responsive manner. This is the first fluorescent turn-on probe within the dipolar naphthalene platform induced by ESIPT (excited state intramolecular proton transfer) suppression that allows us to sense DCNP without any disturbance by other similar G-series chemical weapons. The successful demonstrations of practical applications, such as in vitro analysis, soil analysis, and the development of an on-site real-time prototype sensing kit, encourage further applications in a variety of fields. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorescent Probes for Imaging and Detection)
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Open AccessArticle
Fluorescence-Based Analysis of Noncanonical Functions of Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase-Interacting Multifunctional Proteins (AIMPs) in Peripheral Nerves
Materials 2019, 12(7), 1064; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12071064 - 01 Apr 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase-interacting multifunctional proteins (AIMPs) are auxiliary factors involved in protein synthesis related to aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs). AIMPs, which are well known as nonenzymatic factors, include AIMP1/p43, AIMP2/p38, and AIMP3/p18. The canonical functions of AIMPs include not only protein synthesis via multisynthetase complexes [...] Read more.
Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase-interacting multifunctional proteins (AIMPs) are auxiliary factors involved in protein synthesis related to aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARSs). AIMPs, which are well known as nonenzymatic factors, include AIMP1/p43, AIMP2/p38, and AIMP3/p18. The canonical functions of AIMPs include not only protein synthesis via multisynthetase complexes but also maintenance of the structural stability of these complexes. Several recent studies have demonstrated nontypical (noncanonical) functions of AIMPs, such as roles in apoptosis, inflammatory processes, DNA repair, and so on. However, these noncanonical functions of AIMPs have not been studied in peripheral nerves related to motor and sensory functions. Peripheral nerves include two types of structures: peripheral axons and Schwann cells. The myelin sheath formed by Schwann cells produces saltatory conduction, and these rapid electrical signals control motor and sensory functioning in the service of survival in mammals. Schwann cells play roles not only in myelin sheath formation but also as modulators of nerve degeneration and regeneration. Therefore, it is important to identify the main functions of Schwann cells in peripheral nerves. Here, using immunofluorescence technique, we demonstrated that AIMPs are essential morphological indicators of peripheral nerve degeneration, and their actions are limited to peripheral nerves and not the dorsal root ganglion and the ventral horn of the spinal cord. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorescent Probes for Imaging and Detection)
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