Special Issue "Biocompatible and Biodegradable 3D Scaffolds"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Assoc. Prof. Adriana Kovalcik
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Chemistry and Biotechnology, Faculty of Chemistry, Brno University of Technology, Brno, Czech Republic
Interests: biodegradable polymers; bioengineering; circular economy; composites; lignocellulosic materials
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Tissue engineering intends to develop "neo-tissues" with a chemical nature, morphology, and 3D structure that would encourage infiltration, adhesion, proliferation and cell growth during tissue regeneration or formation. A few technologies have been developed for the processing of scaffolds such as freeze drying, gas foaming, porogen leaching, polymerization-induced phase separation, electrospinning and additive rapid prototyping (e.g., fused deposition modeling, selective laser sintering, and micro-stereolithography). On the one hand, the artificial 3D scaffolds should fulfill demands on precise geometry and morphology (micro- and macro-structures) as well as showing sufficient mechanical stability. On the other hand, they should be non-toxic, nonantigenic, noncarcinogenic, nonteratogenic and biocompatible. Recently, biodegradability has also been marked as a required parameter.

Tissue engineering is a relatively new and rapidly advancing interdisciplinary field of biomedical research that combines knowledge from the biological sciences, polymer chemistry, material engineering, and computer sciences. It is my privilege to invite you to submit a manuscript for the upcoming Special Issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944), entitled “Biocompatible and biodegradable 3D scaffolds”. Full papers, review articles and short communications from the area of tissue engineering focused on the development of biodegradable and biocompatible materials for 3D scaffolds are welcome. The knowledge and results from high-quality and original research aimed at the synthesis/production of biodegradable materials (including biopolymers, synthetic polymers, copolymers, blends, and composites) that remain stable under certain biomechanical conditions, for a particular time, and that degrade at a controlled rate will be highly supported. However, works with a focus on testing and processing methods or strategies, promoting the construction of 3D scaffolds with a sufficient structure and mechanical properties are expected and will receive special attention.

Assoc. Prof. Adriana Kovalcik
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Additive rapid prototyping
  • 3D scaffolds
  • Biocompatibility
  • Biodegradable polymers
  • Biodegradation
  • Cell adhesion
  • Electrospinning
  • Proliferation
  • Surface properties
  • Tissue engineering

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Drug Release Kinetics of Electrospun PHB Meshes
Materials 2019, 12(12), 1924; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12121924 - 14 Jun 2019
Abstract
Microbial poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) has several advantages including its biocompatibility and ability to degrade in vivo and in vitro without toxic substances. This paper investigates the feasibility of electrospun PHB meshes serving as drug delivery systems. The morphology of the electrospun samples was modified [...] Read more.
Microbial poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) has several advantages including its biocompatibility and ability to degrade in vivo and in vitro without toxic substances. This paper investigates the feasibility of electrospun PHB meshes serving as drug delivery systems. The morphology of the electrospun samples was modified by varying the concentration of PHB in solution and the solvent composition. Scanning electron microscopy of the electrospun PHB scaffolds revealed the formation of different morphologies including porous, filamentous/beaded and fiber structures. Levofloxacin was used as the model drug for incorporation into PHB electrospun meshes. The entrapment efficiency was found to be dependent on the viscosity of the PHB solution used for electrospinning and ranged from 14.4–81.8%. The incorporation of levofloxacin in electrospun meshes was confirmed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and UV-VIS spectroscopy. The effect of the morphology of the electrospun meshes on the levofloxacin release profile was screened in vitro in phosphate-buffered saline solution. Depending upon the morphology, the electrospun meshes released about 14–20% of levofloxacin during the first 24 h. The percentage of drug released after 13 days increased up to 32.4% and was similar for all tested morphologies. The antimicrobial efficiency of all tested samples independent of the morphology, was confirmed by agar diffusion testing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biocompatible and Biodegradable 3D Scaffolds)
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Open AccessArticle
Charge and Peptide Concentration as Determinants of the Hydrogel Internal Aqueous Environment
Materials 2019, 12(5), 832; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12050832 - 12 Mar 2019
Abstract
Self-assembling peptides are a promising class of biomaterials with desirable biocompatibility and versatility. In particular, the oligopeptide (RADA)4, consisting of arginine (R), alanine (A), and aspartic acid (D), self-assembles into nanofibers that develop into a three-dimensional hydrogel of up to 99.5% [...] Read more.
Self-assembling peptides are a promising class of biomaterials with desirable biocompatibility and versatility. In particular, the oligopeptide (RADA)4, consisting of arginine (R), alanine (A), and aspartic acid (D), self-assembles into nanofibers that develop into a three-dimensional hydrogel of up to 99.5% (w/v) water; yet, the organization of water within the hydrogel matrix is poorly understood. Importantly, peptide concentration and polarity are hypothesized to control the internal water structure. Using variable temperature deuterium solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (2H NMR) spectroscopy, we measured the amount of bound water in (RADA)4-based hydrogels, quantified as the non-frozen water content. To investigate how peptide polarity affects water structure, five lysine (K) moieties were appended to (RADA)4 to generate (RADA)4K5. Hydrogels at 1 and 5% total peptide concentration were prepared from a 75:25 (w/w) blend of (RADA)4:(RADA)4K5 and similarly analyzed by 2H NMR. Interestingly, at 5% peptide concentration, there was lower mobile water content in the lysinated versus the pristine (RADA)4 hydrogel. Regardless of the presence of lysine, the 5% peptide concentration had higher non-frozen water content at temperatures as low as 217 ± 1.0 K, suggesting that bound water increases with peptide concentration. The bound water, though non-frozen, may be strongly bound to the charged lysine moiety to appear as immobilized water. Further understanding of the factors controlling water structure within hydrogels is important for tuning the transport properties of bioactive solutes in the hydrogel matrix when designing for biomedical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biocompatible and Biodegradable 3D Scaffolds)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Contact of neural cells with coralline biomaterials induces their activation and migration

Tzachy Morad, Roni Hendler, Eyal Canji, Orly Weiss, Zvy Dubinsky, Elimelech Nesher and Danny Baranes*

Activation and migration of neurons and glia toward injury sites following head trauma is a prerequisite for wound healing and brain damage repair. We have previously shown that the biomaterial calcium carbonate in the form of crystalline aragonite derived from the skeleton of corals is adhesive and nurturing and promotes survival and growth of neural cells and nervous tissue in vitro. Here we compared the effect of cultivation of neurospheres containing hippocampal neurons and glia on a coralline scaffold derived from the skeleton of the coral Trachyphyllia to neurospheres cultivated on geological aragonite or glass. The results show that coral skeleton elevated the level of the glial fibrillary acidic protein, an astrocytic activation marker, and that of Neurofilament M, an axonal marker, to higher level than did the other two materials. In addition, the coral skeleton was the strongest in inducing migration of the cells from the neursphere core outward. Hence, coralline biomaterials are inducers of neural cell movement and activation, both required for nervous tissue regeneration, and therefore may serve as a scaffold for brain damaged repair.     

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