Special Issue "Bioactive Compounds from Mangroves and Their-Associated Microbes"

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Hee Jae Shin
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Marine Natural Products Chemistry Laboratory, Korea Institute of Ocean Science & Technology, Korea
Interests: marine microbial natural products chemistry; marine bioactive metabolites as drug leads; structure elucidation; bioactivity; anti-cancer; anti-infectious diseases; anti-inflammatory; deep-sea organisms; symbiotic microorganisms

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The aim of this Special Issue is to demonstrate the importance of some mangroves and mangrove-derived microbes as a source of novel compounds.

Endophytic microbes, such as fungi, bacteria, and actinomycetes, can produce a variety of natural products, which are structurally unique and possess interesting biological and pharmacological activities. Owing to the specific ecological circumstances of mangroves, related endophytes have to cope with both terrestrial and marine environments, resulting in a great microbial diversity and metabolism specificity.

This Special Issue will focus on the recent research progresses in these interrelated disciplines. As a Guest Editor for this Special Issue of Marine Drugs, I invite you to submit your research findings on the mangroves and mangrove-associated microbes including those from the mangrove sediment ranging from the isolation and structure elucidation of new marine natural products to the mechanism studies of the novel bioactive compounds in this area.

Prof. Dr. Hee Jae Shin
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • mangroves
  • mangrove-associated microorganisms
  • endophytic microbes
  • mangrove-derived microbial metabolic diversity
  • marine microorganisms
  • marine pharmaceuticals
  • novel therapeutic agents
  • bioactive compounds
  • marine natural products

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Paenidigyamycin A, Potent Antiparasitic Imidazole Alkaloid from the Ghanaian Paenibacillus sp. DE2SH
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17010009 - 24 Dec 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
A new alkaloid paenidigyamycin A (1) was obtained from the novel Ghanaian Paenibacillus sp. isolated from the mangrove rhizosphere soils of the Pterocarpus santalinoides tree growing in the wetlands of the Digya National Park, Ghana. Compound 1 was isolated on HPLC [...] Read more.
A new alkaloid paenidigyamycin A (1) was obtained from the novel Ghanaian Paenibacillus sp. isolated from the mangrove rhizosphere soils of the Pterocarpus santalinoides tree growing in the wetlands of the Digya National Park, Ghana. Compound 1 was isolated on HPLC at tR = 37.0 min and its structure determined by MS, 1D, and 2D-NMR data. When tested against L. major, 1 (IC50 0.75 µM) was just as effective as amphotericin B (IC50 0.31 µM). Against L. donovani, 1 (IC50 7.02 µM) was twenty-two times less active than amphotericin B (IC50 0.32 µM), reinforcing the unique effectiveness of 1 against L. major. For T. brucei brucei, 1 (IC50 0.78 µM) was ten times more active than the laboratory standard Coptis japonica (IC50 8.20 µM). The IC50 of 9.08 µM for 1 against P. falciparum 3d7 compared to artesunate (IC50 36 nM) was not strong, but this result suggests the possibility of using the paenidigyamycin scaffold for the development of potent antimalarial drugs. Against cercariae, 1 showed high anticercaricidal activity compared to artesunate. The minimal lethal concentration (MLC) and minimal effective concentration (MEC) of the compound were 25 and 6.25 µM, respectively, while artesunate was needed in higher quantities to produce such results. However, 1 (IC50 > 100 µM) was not active against T. mobilensis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds from Mangroves and Their-Associated Microbes)
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Open AccessArticle
Two New Succinimide Derivatives Cladosporitins A and B from the Mangrove-derived Fungus Cladosporium sp. HNWSW-1
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17010004 - 20 Dec 2018
Abstract
Two new succinimide-containing derivatives, cladosporitins A (1) and B (2), were isolated from the fermentation cultures of the mangrove-derived fungus Cladosporium sp. HNWSW-1, along with a new pyrone, clapone (3), as well as the previously reported talaroconvolutin [...] Read more.
Two new succinimide-containing derivatives, cladosporitins A (1) and B (2), were isolated from the fermentation cultures of the mangrove-derived fungus Cladosporium sp. HNWSW-1, along with a new pyrone, clapone (3), as well as the previously reported talaroconvolutin A (4) and anthraquinone (5). The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated by 1D, 2D NMR, and HRMS spectral analysis. Compound 2 showed cytotoxicity against BEL-7042, K562 and SGC-7901 cell lines with IC50 values of 29.4 ± 0.35 μM, 25.6 ± 0.47 μM, and 41.7 ± 0.71 μM, respectively, whereas compound 4 exhibited cytotoxicity against Hela and BEL-7042 cell lines with IC50 values of 14.9 ± 0.21 μM and 26.7 ± 1.1 μM, respectively. In addition, compounds 4 and 5 displayed inhibitory activity against α-glycosidase, with IC50 values of 78.2 ± 2.1 μM and 49.3 ± 10.6 μM, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds from Mangroves and Their-Associated Microbes)
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Open AccessArticle
Mangrove Tirucallane- and Apotirucallane-Type Triterpenoids: Structure Diversity of the C-17 Side-Chain and Natural Agonists of Human Farnesoid/Pregnane–X–Receptor
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(12), 488; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16120488 - 06 Dec 2018
Abstract
Ten new triterpenoid compounds with structure diversity of the C-17 side-chain, including nine tirucallanes, named xylocarpols A–E (15) and agallochols A–D (69), and an apotirucallane, named 25-dehydroxy protoxylogranatin B (10), were isolated from [...] Read more.
Ten new triterpenoid compounds with structure diversity of the C-17 side-chain, including nine tirucallanes, named xylocarpols A–E (15) and agallochols A–D (69), and an apotirucallane, named 25-dehydroxy protoxylogranatin B (10), were isolated from the mangrove plants Xylocarpus granatum, Xylocarpus moluccensis, and Excoecaria agallocha. The structures of these compounds were established by HR-ESIMS and extensive one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR investigations. The absolute configurations of 1 and 2 were unequivocally determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, conducted with Cu Kα radiation; whereas those of 4, 68 were assigned by a modified Mosher’s method and the comparison of experimental electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectra. Most notably, 5, 6, 7, and 9 displayed potent activation effects on farnesoid–X–receptor (FXR) at the concentration of 10.0 μM; 10 exhibited very significant agonistic effects on pregnane–X–receptor (PXR) at the concentration of 10.0 nM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds from Mangroves and Their-Associated Microbes)
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Open AccessArticle
New Eudesmane-Type Sesquiterpenoids from the Mangrove-Derived Endophytic Fungus Penicillium sp. J-54
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(4), 108; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16040108 - 28 Mar 2018
Cited by 6
Abstract
Four new eudesmane-type sesquiterpenoids, penicieudesmol A–D (14), were isolated from the fermentation broth of the mangrove-derived endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. J-54. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic methods, the in situ dimolybdenum CD method, and modified Mosher’s method. The [...] Read more.
Four new eudesmane-type sesquiterpenoids, penicieudesmol A–D (14), were isolated from the fermentation broth of the mangrove-derived endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. J-54. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic methods, the in situ dimolybdenum CD method, and modified Mosher’s method. The bioassays results showed that 2 exhibited weak cytotoxicity against K-562 cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds from Mangroves and Their-Associated Microbes)
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Open AccessArticle
Twenty-Nine New Limonoids with Skeletal Diversity from the Mangrove Plant, Xylocarpus moluccensis
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(1), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16010038 - 19 Jan 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
Twenty-nine new limonoids—named xylomolins A1–A7, B1–B2, C1–C2, D–F, G1–G5, H–I, J1–J2, K1–K2, L1–L2, and M–N, [...] Read more.
Twenty-nine new limonoids—named xylomolins A1–A7, B1–B2, C1–C2, D–F, G1–G5, H–I, J1–J2, K1–K2, L1–L2, and M–N, were isolated from the seeds of the mangrove plant, Xylocarpus moluccensis. Compounds 113 are mexicanolides with one double bond or two conjugated double bonds, while 14 belongs to a small group of mexicanolides with an oxygen bridge between C1 and C8. Compounds 1519 are khayanolides containing a Δ8,14 double bond, whereas 20 and 21 are rare khayanolides containing a Δ14,15 double bond and Δ8,9, Δ14,15 conjugated double bonds, respectively. Compounds 22 and 23 are unusual limonoids possessing a (Z)-bicyclo[5.2.1]dec-3-en-8-one motif, while 24 and 25 are 30-ketophragmalins with Δ8,9, Δ14,15 conjugated double bonds. Compounds 26 and 27 are phragmalin 8,9,30-ortho esters, whereas 28 and 29 are azadirone and andirobin derivatives, respectively. The structures of these compounds, including absolute configurations of 1519, 2123, and 26, were established by HRESIMS, extensive 1D and 2D NMR investigations, and the comparison of experimental electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectra. The absolute configuration of 1 was unequivocally established by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, obtained with Cu Kα radiation. The diverse cyclization patterns of 129 reveal the strong flexibility of skeletal plasticity in the limonoid biosynthesis of X. moluccensis. Compound 23 exhibited weak antitumor activity against human triple-negative breast MD-MBA-231 cancer cells with an IC50 value of 37.7 μM. Anti-HIV activities of 1, 3, 8, 10, 11, 14, 20, 2325, and 27 were tested in vitro. However, no compounds showed potent inhibitory activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds from Mangroves and Their-Associated Microbes)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Ethnopharmacology, Phytochemistry, and Global Distribution of Mangroves―A Comprehensive Review
Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(4), 231; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17040231 - 18 Apr 2019
Abstract
Mangroves are ecologically important plants in marine habitats that occupy the coastlines of many countries. In addition to their key ecological importance, various parts of mangroves are widely used in folklore medicine and claimed to effectively manage a panoply of human pathologies. To [...] Read more.
Mangroves are ecologically important plants in marine habitats that occupy the coastlines of many countries. In addition to their key ecological importance, various parts of mangroves are widely used in folklore medicine and claimed to effectively manage a panoply of human pathologies. To date, no comprehensive attempt has been made to compile and critically analyze the published literature in light of its ethnopharmacological uses. This review aims to provide a comprehensive account of the morphological characteristics, ethnobotany, global distribution, taxonomy, ethnopharmacology, phytochemical profiles, and pharmacological activities of traditionally used mangroves. Out of 84 mangrove species, only 27 species were found to be traditionally used, however not all of them are pharmacologically validated. The most common pharmacological activities reported were antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antidiabetic properties. Mangroves traditionally reported against ulcers have not been extensively validated for possible pharmacological properties. Terpenoids, tannins, steroids, alkaloids, flavonoids, and saponins were the main classes of phytochemicals isolated from mangroves. Given that mangroves have huge potential for a wide array of medicinal products and drug discovery to prevent and treat many diseases, there is a dire need for careful investigations substantiated with accurate scientific and clinical evidence to ensure safety and efficient use of these plants and validate their pharmacological properties and toxicity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds from Mangroves and Their-Associated Microbes)
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Open AccessReview
Lead Compounds from Mangrove-Associated Microorganisms
Mar. Drugs 2018, 16(9), 319; https://doi.org/10.3390/md16090319 - 07 Sep 2018
Cited by 9
Abstract
The mangrove ecosystem is considered as an attractive biodiversity hotspot that is intensively studied in the hope of discovering new useful chemical scaffolds, including those with potential medicinal application. In the past two decades, mangrove-derived microorganisms, along with mangrove plants, proved to be [...] Read more.
The mangrove ecosystem is considered as an attractive biodiversity hotspot that is intensively studied in the hope of discovering new useful chemical scaffolds, including those with potential medicinal application. In the past two decades, mangrove-derived microorganisms, along with mangrove plants, proved to be rich sources of bioactive secondary metabolites as exemplified by the constant rise in the number of publications, which suggests the great potential of this important ecological niche. The present review summarizes selected examples of bioactive compounds either from mangrove endophytes or from soil-derived mangrove fungi and bacteria, covering the literature from 2014 to March 2018. Accordingly, 163 natural products are described in this review, possessing a wide range of potent bioactivities, such as cytotoxic, antibacterial, antifungal, α-glucosidase inhibitory, protein tyrosine phosphatase B inhibitory, and antiviral activities, among others. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds from Mangroves and Their-Associated Microbes)
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