Primitive and Metastatic Tumours of the Skin

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Physiology and Pathology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2021) | Viewed by 12038

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Chief Guest Editor
Unit of Pathology, Fondazione IRCCS Ospedale “Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza”, Viale Cappuccini 1, 71013 San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy
Interests: gastro-intestinal cancer; bilio-pancreatic cancer; IBD; celiac disease; histopathology; immunohistochemistry; hematopathology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pathology, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Policlinico, 41124 Modena, Italy
Interests: colorectal cancer; prostate cancer; and skin cancer; histopathology and molecular pathology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Skin tumors are an intriguing topic in daily pathological practice.  Despite their high incidence, their morphological and biological profiles are not yet been well elucidated because of their heterogeneity and multiplicity in clinical and histological findings. Moreover, cutaneous metastasis from solid tumors is an unusual event, often leading to diagnostic troubles and mistakes in differential diagnosis with primitive skin tumors.

In this Special Issue of Life, we would like to propose an opportunity for pathologists and clinicians to treat the unresolved and most recent topics in primitive and metastatic skin tumors with special focus on histological, immunohistochemical, and biological profiles. Reviews and studies about immunohistochemical and biological characteristics of both primitive and metastatic skin tumors affecting the clinical and therapeutic approach as well as the application of new promising diagnostic tools, are, moreover, encouraged.

Dr. Paola Parente
Dr. Luca Reggiani Bonetti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Life is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • primitive skin tumors
  • metastasis
  • immunohistochemistry
  • cutaneous lymphoma
  • cutaneous surgery

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

11 pages, 1136 KiB  
Article
Cutaneous Metastasis from Colorectal Cancer: Making Light on an Unusual and Misdiagnosed Event
by Paola Parente, Davide Ciardiello, Luca Reggiani Bonetti, Vincenzo Famiglietti, Gerardo Cazzato, Stefania Caramaschi, Vito Attino, Diego Urbano, Giuseppe Di Maggio and Giuseppe Ingravallo
Life 2021, 11(9), 954; https://doi.org/10.3390/life11090954 - 11 Sep 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2345
Abstract
Cutaneous metastasis from solid tumors is a rare event and usually represents a late occurrence in the natural history of an advanced visceral malignancy. Rarely, cutaneous metastasis has been described in colorectal cancer patients. The most frequent cutaneous site of colorectal metastasis is [...] Read more.
Cutaneous metastasis from solid tumors is a rare event and usually represents a late occurrence in the natural history of an advanced visceral malignancy. Rarely, cutaneous metastasis has been described in colorectal cancer patients. The most frequent cutaneous site of colorectal metastasis is the surgical scar in the abdomen following the removal of the primary malignancy, followed by the extremities, perineum, head, neck, and penis. Metastases to the thigh and back of the trunk are anecdotical. Dermatological diagnosis of cutaneous metastasis can be quite complex, especially in unusual sites, such as in the facial skin or thorax and in cases of single cutaneous lesions since metastasis from colorectal cancer is not usually the first clinical hypothesis, leading to misdiagnosis. To date, due to the rarity of cutaneous metastasis from colorectal cancer, little evidence, most of which is based on case reports and very small case series, is currently available. Therefore, a better understanding of the clinic-pathological characteristics of this unusual metastatic site represents an unmet clinical need. We present a large series of 29 cutaneous metastases from colorectal cancer with particular concerns regarding anatomic localization and the time of onset with respect to primitive colorectal cancer and visceral metastases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Primitive and Metastatic Tumours of the Skin)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research

10 pages, 8887 KiB  
Case Report
Cutaneous Localization of Classic Hodgkin Lymphoma Associated with Mycosis Fungoides: Report of a Rare Event and Review of the Literature
by Magda Zanelli, Stefano Ricci, Francesca Sanguedolce, Andrea Palicelli, Enrico Farnetti, Alessandro Tafuni, Maurizio Zizzo, Riccardo Valli, Maria Isabel Alvarez De Celis, Alberto Cavazza, Caterina Longo and Stefano Ascani
Life 2021, 11(10), 1069; https://doi.org/10.3390/life11101069 - 11 Oct 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 4271
Abstract
Mycosis fungoides and nodal classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) have been reported to occur concurrently or sequentially in the same patient. A long-lasting mycosis fungoides more often precedes the onset of nodal cHL, although few cases of nodal cHL followed by mycosis fungoides have [...] Read more.
Mycosis fungoides and nodal classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) have been reported to occur concurrently or sequentially in the same patient. A long-lasting mycosis fungoides more often precedes the onset of nodal cHL, although few cases of nodal cHL followed by mycosis fungoides have been observed. Skin involvement is a rare manifestation of cHL that may be observed in the setting of advanced disease. The decrease in skin involvement in cHL is mainly due to the improved therapeutic strategies. The concurrent presence of mycosis fungoides and cutaneous localization of classic Hodgkin lymphoma represents a very uncommon event, with only two cases reported so far. Herein, we describe the case of a 71-year-old man, with a history of recurrent nodal cHL, who developed MF and, subsequently, the cutaneous localization of cHL. The clinicopathological features of the two diseases are described focusing on the main differential diagnoses to be taken into consideration, and a review of the literature is performed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Primitive and Metastatic Tumours of the Skin)
Show Figures

Figure 1

9 pages, 667 KiB  
Case Report
Long-Term Maintained Response to Selective Internal Radiation Therapy in an Oligometastatic Uveal Melanoma Patient Treated with Concomitant Anti-PD-1 Therapy
by Ilaria Proietti, Nevena Skroza, Luca Filippi, Nicoletta Bernardini, Alessandra Mambrin, Ersilia Tolino, Giovanni Rossi, Anna Marchesiello, Federica Marraffa, Salvatore Volpe, Oreste Bagni and Concetta Potenza
Life 2021, 11(7), 692; https://doi.org/10.3390/life11070692 - 14 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1953
Abstract
Uveal melanoma (UM) is a primary neoplasm of the eye arising from the melanocytes residing in the iris, ciliary body or choroid. It is the most frequent intraocular malignancy and often determines metastases at distant sites, with a peculiar tropism for the liver. [...] Read more.
Uveal melanoma (UM) is a primary neoplasm of the eye arising from the melanocytes residing in the iris, ciliary body or choroid. It is the most frequent intraocular malignancy and often determines metastases at distant sites, with a peculiar tropism for the liver. Metastatic UM has a poor prognosis, as any treatment affects the natural course of this fatal disease. Herein, we report a case of a UM metastatic to the liver in a 54 year-old female patient, initially treated with nivolumab without success. The patient was then scheduled for selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) while continuing immunotherapy. This combination led to a complete and durable response and the patient is currently free of disease, two years after the diagnosis of the hepatic metastases. The association between SIRT and immunotherapy (IT) has very promising perspectives for metastatic UM, especially considering the disappointing or contradictory results of classic chemotherapies, IT alone and targeted therapies. Furthermore, this combination has been shown to have a good security profile. However, further studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of associating SIRT and IT and to clarify some unsolved problems, such as the timing of administration of these two therapies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Primitive and Metastatic Tumours of the Skin)
Show Figures

Figure 1

6 pages, 2437 KiB  
Case Report
Cutaneous Metastases from Primary Liver Cancers: The Need for Knowledge and Differential Diagnosis
by Gerardo Cazzato, Anna Colagrande, Antonietta Cimmino, Aurora De Marco, Paolo Romita, Caterina Foti, Leonardo Resta and Giuseppe Ingravallo
Life 2021, 11(6), 559; https://doi.org/10.3390/life11060559 - 14 Jun 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2419
Abstract
Primary skin tumors are certainly more frequent than metastatic tumors, but the latter can sometimes be the first sign of otherwise unrecognized neoplastic pathology and always correspond to an advanced stage of the disease. Among the various neoplasms that can metastasize in cutaneous [...] Read more.
Primary skin tumors are certainly more frequent than metastatic tumors, but the latter can sometimes be the first sign of otherwise unrecognized neoplastic pathology and always correspond to an advanced stage of the disease. Among the various neoplasms that can metastasize in cutaneous districts, skin metastases from primary malignant neoplasms from the liver and biliary tract are infrequent, and when they do occur they can pose differential diagnosis problems to the pathologist. Here we present two cases of metastatic skin lesions, respectively originating from the liver and the intrahepatic biliary tract, and we conduct a brief review of the current literature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Primitive and Metastatic Tumours of the Skin)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop