Bioactive Natural Compounds for Therapeutics and Nutraceutical Applications

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Pharmaceutical Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 May 2020) | Viewed by 19789

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CICECO–Aveiro Institute of Materials, Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: biorefinery; biomass valorization; green extraction methodologies; natural compounds; phenolic compounds; lipophilic compounds; HPLC-MS
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Pharmacognosy, UMR CNRS 8638, Faculty of Pharmacy, Paris Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 4 avenue de l’Observatoire, 75006 Paris, France
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Medical University-Sofia, 2 Dunav Str., Sofia, Bulgaria
Interests: mast cell; inflammation; degranulation; allergy; histamine; G protein-coupled receptor; IgE; cytokine
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, natural compounds have been rediscovered as valuable and effective drug candidates, being increasingly recognized as new emerging ingredients/additives in therapeutics for the management of different acute and chronic diseases and nutraceutical applications. Consequently, natural resources, including, e.g., plants, algae, fungi, and all biomass processing by-products, have been widely exploited as sources of bioactive natural compounds, and a great effort has been devoted to the extraction, characterization, and biological activity evaluation of novel valuable natural compounds, focused particularly in the discovery of new therapeutics or nutraceutics.

The journals IJMS and Life will jointly be publishing a Special Issue covering the topic "Bioactive Natural Compounds for Therapeutics and Nutraceutical Applications". This Special Issue welcomes original research and reviews in the field, with focus on the extraction and characterization of new natural bioactive components and their potential for therapeutics or nutraceutical applications, including but not limited to the recent developments on the study of the structure–bioactivity relationship and the incorporation of bioactive compounds in novel functional matrices.

Dr. Sonia A.O. Santos
Prof. Dr. Armando J. D. Silvestre
Dr. Raphael Grougnet
Dr. Vessela Balabanova
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Life is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

13 pages, 629 KiB  
Article
UPLC-MS/MS Phytochemical Analysis of Two Croatian Cistus Species and Their Biological Activity
by Ivana Carev, Ana Maravić, Nada Ilić, Vedrana Čikeš Čulić, Olivera Politeo, Zoran Zorić and Mila Radan
Life 2020, 10(7), 112; https://doi.org/10.3390/life10070112 - 14 Jul 2020
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 3534
Abstract
Aqueous extracts of two Cistus species wild growing in Croatia—Cistus creticus (CC) and Cistus salviifolius (CS)—have been assessed with UPLC-MS/MS, showing 43 different phytochemicals, with flavonol glycosides: myricetin-3-hexoside and myricetin-rhamnoside, predominate ones in CC and myricetin-3-hexoside in CS. Antioxidant potential tested with [...] Read more.
Aqueous extracts of two Cistus species wild growing in Croatia—Cistus creticus (CC) and Cistus salviifolius (CS)—have been assessed with UPLC-MS/MS, showing 43 different phytochemicals, with flavonol glycosides: myricetin-3-hexoside and myricetin-rhamnoside, predominate ones in CC and myricetin-3-hexoside in CS. Antioxidant potential tested with the FRAP method showed no difference between CS and CC aqueous extracts, while higher phenolic content of CC comparing to CS, determined with a Folin–Cicolateu reagent correlated to its higher antioxidant capacity observed by the DPPH method. Both extracts were assessed for antimicrobial activity, using disc-diffusion and broth microdilution assays, targeting the opportunistic pathogens, associated with food poisoning, urinary, respiratory tract, blood stream and wound infections in humans. Antimicrobial assays revealed that fungi were in general more sensitive to both Cistus aqueous extracts, comparing to the bacteria where two extracts showed very similar activity. The most potent activity was observed against A. baumannii for both extracts. The extracts were tested on human lung cancer (A549) cell line using the MTT assay, showing very similar antiproliferative activity. After 72 h treatment with CC and CS aqueous extracts in concentration of 0.5 g/L, the viability of the cells were 37% and 50% respectively, compared to non-treated cells. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 1611 KiB  
Article
Almond Skin Extracts and Chlorogenic Acid Delay Chronological Aging and Enhanced Oxidative Stress Response in Yeast
by Duangjai Tungmunnithum, Malika Abid, Ahmed Elamrani, Samantha Drouet, Mohamed Addi and Christophe Hano
Life 2020, 10(6), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/life10060080 - 28 May 2020
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 4051
Abstract
Almond (Prunus dulcis (Mill.) D.A.Webb) is one of the largest nut crops in the world. Recently, phenolic compounds, mostly stored in almond skin, have been associated with much of the health-promoting behavior associated with their intake. The almond skin enriched fraction obtained [...] Read more.
Almond (Prunus dulcis (Mill.) D.A.Webb) is one of the largest nut crops in the world. Recently, phenolic compounds, mostly stored in almond skin, have been associated with much of the health-promoting behavior associated with their intake. The almond skin enriched fraction obtained from cold-pressed oil residues of the endemic Moroccan Beldi ecotypes is particularly rich in chlorogenic acid. In this study, both almond skin extract (AE) and chlorogenic acid (CHL) supplements, similar to traditional positive control resveratrol, significantly increased the chronological life-span of yeast compared to the untreated group. Our results showed that AE and CHL significantly reduced the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS), most likely due to their ability to maintain mitochondrial function during aging, as indicated by the maintenance of normal mitochondrial membrane potential in treated groups. This may be associated with the observed activation of the anti-oxidative stress response in treated yeast, which results in activation at both gene expression and enzymatic activity levels for SOD2 and SIR2, the latter being an upstream inducer of SOD2 expression. Interestingly, the differential gene expression induction of mitochondrial SOD2 gene at the expense of the cytosolic SOD1 gene confirms the key role of mitochondrial function in this regulation. Furthermore, AE and CHL have contributed to the survival of yeast under UV-C-induced oxidative stress, by reducing the development of ROS/RNS, resulting in a significant reduction in cellular oxidative damage, as evidenced by decreased membrane lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl content and 8-oxo-guanine formation in DNA. Together, these results demonstrate the interest of AE and CHL as new regulators in the chronological life-span and control of the oxidative stress response of yeast. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

23 pages, 1116 KiB  
Review
A Comprehensive Review of the Nutraceutical and Therapeutic Applications of Red Seaweeds (Rhodophyta)
by João Cotas, Adriana Leandro, Diana Pacheco, Ana M. M. Gonçalves and Leonel Pereira
Life 2020, 10(3), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/life10030019 - 26 Feb 2020
Cited by 117 | Viewed by 11488
Abstract
The red seaweed group (Rhodophyta) is one of the phyla of macroalgae, among the groups Phaeophyceae and Chlorophyta, brown and green seaweeds, respectively. Nowadays, all groups of macroalgae are getting the attention of the scientific community due to the bioactive substances they produce. [...] Read more.
The red seaweed group (Rhodophyta) is one of the phyla of macroalgae, among the groups Phaeophyceae and Chlorophyta, brown and green seaweeds, respectively. Nowadays, all groups of macroalgae are getting the attention of the scientific community due to the bioactive substances they produce. Several macroalgae products have exceptional properties with nutraceutical, pharmacological, and biomedical interest. The main compounds studied are the fatty acids, pigments, phenols, and polysaccharides. Polysaccharides are the most exploited molecules, which are already widely used in various industries and are, presently, entering into more advanced applications from the therapeutic point of view. The focuses of this review are the red seaweeds’ compounds, its proprieties, and its uses. Moreover, this work discusses new possible applications of the compounds of the red seaweeds. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop