Special Issue "Bacterial Cellulose Composites"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Carmen S. R. S. R. Freire
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CICECO – Aveiro Institute of Materials, Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Fax: +351 234 370 084
Interests: Production and application of biogenic nanofibers (bacterial cellulose and protein fibrils), nanostructured bio-composites; bio-based materials for biomedical applications (wound healing and drug delivery); bio-composites and functional paper materials; chemical modification of (nano)cellulose fibers and other polysaccharides and their characterization and applications; chemistry of lignocellulosic materials (cellulose, wood, cork, etc.); valorisation of biomass residues; isolation, characterization and chemical transformations of bioactive components.
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Prof. Armando J. D. Silvestre
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CICECO – Aveiro Institute of Materials, Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Tel. c; Fax: +351 234 370 084
Interests: Sustainable extraction and upgrading of added-value compounds from biomass, addressing mainly bioactive compounds through the use benign solvents; new bio-based polymers derived from 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid and new functional (nano)composite materials and biomaterials based on biopolymers and cellulose (nano)fibers.
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Carla Vilela
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CICECO – Aveiro Institute of Materials, Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: Sustainable use of biopolymers (bacterial cellulose, chitosan, alginate, pullulan, proteins, etc.) for the design and engineering of functional nanostructured materials for both biomedical (e.g., drug delivery) and technological (e.g., active packaging and fuel cells) applications
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The bacterial cellulose fan club has witnessed a massive increase in its number of members, mainly due to the unique features of this exquisite and extraordinary nanoscale form of cellulose. The high purity, biocompatibility, biodegradability, water-holding capacity, crystallinity, and excellent mechanical properties have expanded the application horizons of this biopolymer (and materials thereof) to a multitude of domains, spanning from the food industry to specific technological and biomedical applications.

This Special Issue will compile recent advances of leading researchers in the field of bacterial cellulose-based nanocomposites, particularly in what concerns their production, properties, and applications. Therefore, nanocomposites fabricated with diverse partners, including (but not limited to) synthetic and natural polymers, bioactive compounds and inorganic nanoparticles, are more than welcome to the Special Issue on “Bacterial Cellulose Composites”.

Prof. Dr. Carmen S. R. Freire
Prof. Dr. Armando J. D. Silvestre
Dr. Carla Vilela
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Bacterial cellulose
  • nanocomposites
  • polymer-matrix composites
  • aerogels
  • hybrid materials
  • biomedical applications
  • technological applications

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Preparation and Characterization of Bacterial Cellulose-Carbon Dot Hybrid Nanopaper for Potential Sensing Applications
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(1), 107; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9010107 - 29 Dec 2018
Abstract
Green and facile approaches aiming at the manufacture of biocompatible paper-based optical sensors reporting the presence of photoluminescence (PL) modulating compounds is an emerging field of research. This study investigates the preparation of bacterial cellulose nanopaper containing covalently immobilized carbon dots for potential [...] Read more.
Green and facile approaches aiming at the manufacture of biocompatible paper-based optical sensors reporting the presence of photoluminescence (PL) modulating compounds is an emerging field of research. This study investigates the preparation of bacterial cellulose nanopaper containing covalently immobilized carbon dots for potential biosensing applications. Preliminary work of this feasibility study included TEMPO-mediated ((2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-yl)oxyl-mediated) oxidation and nanofibrillation of bacterial cellulose (TOBC) on the one hand as well as synthesis and comparative analysis of different types of carbon dots (CDs) on the other hand. The two source materials of the targeted functional nanopaper were finally linked to each other by two different N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N′-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride/ N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) coupling approaches to clarify whether grafting of CDs prior to or after TOBC paper formation would be the method of choice. Synthesis of the carbon nanodots was accomplished by microwave-assisted co-hydrothermolysis of appropriate precursor compounds. After isolation and purification by dialysis particles in the single-digit nanometer-range were obtained and characterized with regard to their photoluminescence properties in terms of emission wavelength, pH stability, and quantum yield. All types of synthesized CDs reached their PL maxima (450–480 nm; light blue) in a narrow excitation wavelength range of 340–360 nm. Variation of molar (C/N) ratio of the CD precursors and substitution of the nitrogen donor EDEA by urea increased PL and quantum yield (QY), respectively. The highest relative QY of nearly 32% was obtained for CDs synthesized from citric acid and urea. PL of all CDs was virtually insensitive to pH changes in the range of 4–10. Tensile testing of hybrid nanopaper prepared after EDC/NHS-mediated grafting of GEA-type CDs onto TOBC (0.52 mmol·g−1 COOH) in dispersion state revealed that both stiffness and strength are not compromised by incorporation of carbon dots, while plastic deformation and elongation at break increased slightly compared to nanopaper formed prior to decoration with CDs. Water contact angle of the nanopaper is unaffected by introduction of carbon dots which is supposedly due to the presence of surface amino- and amide groups compensating for the loss of carboxyl groups by grafting. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bacterial Cellulose Composites)
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Open AccessArticle
Novel Bionanocellulose/κ-Carrageenan Composites for Tissue Engineering
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(8), 1352; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8081352 - 12 Aug 2018
Cited by 4
Abstract
In this work, novel bacterial cellulose/κ-carrageenan (BNC/κ-Car) composites, being potential scaffolds for tissue engineering (TE), and outperforming the two polymers when used as scaffolds separately, were for the first time obtained using an in situ method, based on the stationary culture of bacteria [...] Read more.
In this work, novel bacterial cellulose/κ-carrageenan (BNC/κ-Car) composites, being potential scaffolds for tissue engineering (TE), and outperforming the two polymers when used as scaffolds separately, were for the first time obtained using an in situ method, based on the stationary culture of bacteria Komagateibacter xylinus E25. The composites were compared with native BNC in terms of the morphology of fibers, chemical composition, crystallinity, tensile and compression strength, water holding capacity, water retention ratio and swelling properties. Murine chondrogenic ATDC5 cells were applied to assess the utility of the BNC/κ-Car composites as potential scaffolds. The impact of the composites on the cells viability, chondrogenic differentiation, and expression patterns of Col1α1, Col2α1, Runx2, and Sox9, which are indicative of ATDC5 chondrogenic differentiation, was determined. None of the composites obtained in this study caused the chondrocyte hypertrophy. All of them supported the differentiation of ATDC5 cells to more chondrogenic phenotype. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bacterial Cellulose Composites)
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Open AccessArticle
Characteristics of Curcumin-Loaded Bacterial Cellulose Films and Anticancer Properties against Malignant Melanoma Skin Cancer Cells
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(7), 1188; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8071188 - 20 Jul 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
Curcumin-loaded bacterial cellulose films were developed in this study. Curcumin was absorbed into never-dried bacterial cellulose pellicles by 24-h immersion in solutions of curcumin in the range of 0.2–1.0 mg /mL. The curcumin-loaded bacterial cellulose pellicles were then air-dried and characterized. The mechanical [...] Read more.
Curcumin-loaded bacterial cellulose films were developed in this study. Curcumin was absorbed into never-dried bacterial cellulose pellicles by 24-h immersion in solutions of curcumin in the range of 0.2–1.0 mg /mL. The curcumin-loaded bacterial cellulose pellicles were then air-dried and characterized. The mechanical properties of curcumin-loaded bacterial cellulose films, particularly the stretching properties, appeared to be lower than those of bacterial cellulose film. This was especially evident when the loading concentration of curcumin was higher than 0.4 mg/mL. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy analysis indicated an interaction between bacterial cellulose microfibrils and curcumin. Controlled release of curcumin was achieved in buffer solutions containing Tween 80 and methanol additives, at pH 5.5 and 7.4. Curcumin-loaded bacterial cellulose films prepared with curcumin solutions at concentrations of 0.5 and 1.0 mg/mL displayed antifungal activities against Aspergillus niger. They also exhibited anticancer activity against A375 malignant melanoma cells. No significant cytotoxic effect was observed against normal dermal cells, specifically, human keratinocytes and human dermal fibroblasts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bacterial Cellulose Composites)
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Open AccessArticle
Poly(bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate)/Bacterial Cellulose Nanocomposites: Preparation, Characterization and Application as Polymer Electrolyte Membranes
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(7), 1145; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8071145 - 14 Jul 2018
Cited by 12
Abstract
Recent studies have demonstrated the potential of bacterial cellulose (BC) as a substrate for the design of bio-based ion exchange membranes with an excellent combination of conductive and mechanical properties for application in devices entailing functional ion conducting elements. In this context, the [...] Read more.
Recent studies have demonstrated the potential of bacterial cellulose (BC) as a substrate for the design of bio-based ion exchange membranes with an excellent combination of conductive and mechanical properties for application in devices entailing functional ion conducting elements. In this context, the present study aims at fabricating polyelectrolyte nanocomposite membranes based on poly(bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate) [P(bisMEP)] and BC via the in-situ free radical polymerization of bis[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate (bisMEP) inside the BC three-dimensional network under eco-friendly reaction conditions. The resulting polyelectrolyte nanocomposites exhibit thermal stability up to 200 °C, good mechanical performance (Young’s modulus > 2 GPa), water-uptake ability (79–155%) and ion exchange capacity ([H+] = 1.1–3.0 mmol g−1). Furthermore, a maximum protonic conductivity of ca. 0.03 S cm−1 was observed for the membrane with P(bisMEP)/BC of 1:1 in weight, at 80 °C and 98% relative humidity. The use of a bifunctional monomer that obviates the need of using a cross-linker to retain the polyelectrolyte inside the BC network is the main contribution of this study, thus opening alternative routes for the development of bio-based polyelectrolyte membranes for application in e.g., fuel cells and other devices based on proton separators. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bacterial Cellulose Composites)
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