New Developments in Galician Linguistics

A special issue of Languages (ISSN 2226-471X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2024) | Viewed by 6626

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Instituto da Lingua Galega, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15705 Santiago de Compostela, A Coruña, Spain
Interests: variation and change; language contact; language ideologies; phonetics

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Instituto da Lingua Galega, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15705 Santiago de Compostela, A Coruña, Spain
Interests: language contact; variation and change; discourse analysis; intonation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Galician linguistics has a short history, but in the last 50 years it has seen remarkable development and, particularly in the last two decades, new lines of research have been initiated and new methodologies have been incorporated, demonstrating that Galician linguistics has reached a level of development comparable to studies in any other language in its context. The goal of this Special Issue is to present a representative sample of the state of research on Galician linguistics, including studies with innovative methodologies and lines of recent development in Galician linguistics, combining the work of researchers of recognized prestige with that of young researchers, as a sign of the field’s vitality and future prospects.

We encourage contributions on any aspect of the Galician language, particularly works that are an expression of recent developments in the field of language contact, variation, sociolinguistics and discourse and identity studies. Manuscripts should be between 8000 and 12000 words in length.

Tentative completion schedule:

  • Abstract submission deadline: 15 April 2023
  • Notification of abstract acceptance: 15 May 2023
  • Full manuscript deadline: 31 January 2024

We request that, prior to submitting a manuscript, interested authors initially submit a proposed title and an abstract of 400-600 words summarizing their intended contribution. Please send it to the guest editors ([email protected]) or to the Languages editorial office ([email protected]). Abstracts will be reviewed by the guest editors for the purposes of ensuring proper fit within the scope of the Special Issue. Full manuscripts will undergo double-blind peer-review.

Prof. Dr. Xosé Luís Regueira
Dr. Elisa Fernández Rei
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Languages is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Galician language
  • variation and change
  • language contact
  • language ideologies
  • language and identities
  • phonetics
  • grammar studies
  • dialectology
  • language perception

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

23 pages, 1173 KiB  
Article
Semantic Fields and Castilianization in Galician: A Comparative Study with the Loanword Typology Project
by María Álvarez de la Granja and Francisco Dubert García
Languages 2024, 9(7), 244; https://doi.org/10.3390/languages9070244 - 9 Jul 2024
Viewed by 365
Abstract
This study examines the correspondence between the borrowability indices from the Loanwoard Typology (LWT) project and Castilianization indices from the Atlas Lingüístico Galego (ALGa) across seven semantic fields. To this end, we identified all Castilianisms in the ALGa and [...] Read more.
This study examines the correspondence between the borrowability indices from the Loanwoard Typology (LWT) project and Castilianization indices from the Atlas Lingüístico Galego (ALGa) across seven semantic fields. To this end, we identified all Castilianisms in the ALGa and conducted a quantitative analysis to compare these indices. Results obtained indicate a mismatch between the rankings of the LWT project and the ALGa. For example, the field ‘The body’ has the highest level of Castilianization according to the ALGa but the lowest borrowed score in the LWT project. Moreover, Castilianization levels in the ALGa show greater dispersion than borrowability levels from the LWT project. In fact, in each semantic field, many concepts (52.2%) have low levels of Castilianization, between 0% and 10%, and only a few concepts have high levels. A more detailed analysis of three semantic fields (‘The body’, ‘Agriculture and vegetation’, and ‘The physical world’) suggests that explanations based solely on semantic criteria (such as the existence of an unalterable central lexicon) are insufficient; other factors such as prestige, urbanization, cultural modernity, frequency of word usage, and perhaps other intralinguistic factors should be taken into account. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Developments in Galician Linguistics)
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30 pages, 3485 KiB  
Article
Variable Acceptability of Differential Object Marking in Bilingual Galician–Spanish Speakers: An Exploratory Study
by Manuel Delicado Cantero and M. Carmen Parafita Couto
Languages 2024, 9(7), 228; https://doi.org/10.3390/languages9070228 - 24 Jun 2024
Viewed by 676
Abstract
This paper presents an initial study of the acceptability of differential object marking (DOM) by Galician–Spanish bilinguals in Galicia. The research explores judgments provided by these bilinguals (n = 69) on DOM in both Galician and Spanish and it also explores data from [...] Read more.
This paper presents an initial study of the acceptability of differential object marking (DOM) by Galician–Spanish bilinguals in Galicia. The research explores judgments provided by these bilinguals (n = 69) on DOM in both Galician and Spanish and it also explores data from a monolingual Spanish control group (n = 12). The surveys target contexts covering key syntactic and semantic–pragmatic contexts for DOM in Galician and Spanish, based on the existing literature. The Galician data reveal a tendency towards reduced acceptability of DOM compared to Spanish, but without a generalized rejection of DOM in any of the contexts. The Spanish data show variability in both groups. The study contributes insights from an under-studied language pair and aims to open avenues for further work. More generally, it enhances our understanding of DOM in bilingual grammars, particularly in microcontact situations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Developments in Galician Linguistics)
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20 pages, 1240 KiB  
Article
Two Languages, One Goal: Code-Switching in Doctor–Patient Communication in the Galician Healthcare System
by Vanesa Rodríguez Tembrás
Languages 2024, 9(6), 209; https://doi.org/10.3390/languages9060209 - 6 Jun 2024
Viewed by 575
Abstract
This paper examines bilingual communications between family doctors and patients in Galicia (Spain). The study adopts a sociolinguistic and sociopragmatic approach to analyze how language choice and code-switching (CS) impact their interactions. The main objectives are understanding language dynamics within a speech community [...] Read more.
This paper examines bilingual communications between family doctors and patients in Galicia (Spain). The study adopts a sociolinguistic and sociopragmatic approach to analyze how language choice and code-switching (CS) impact their interactions. The main objectives are understanding language dynamics within a speech community and identifying factors influencing language use in healthcare, focusing on language alternation, associated with language choice, and language accommodation. The research utilized a twofold dataset. First, a corpus of 586 audio-recorded medical consultations and eight semi-structured interviews with all participating doctors offered real-life linguistic dynamics between doctors and patients. Additionally, a second dataset with 208 questionnaires and 15 semi-structured interviews provided insights into language preferences and attitudes, inside and outside the doctor’s office. The findings indicate that doctors and patients strategically select and switch between Spanish and Galician to achieve communication goals. Approximately half of the consultations are bilingual, either with or without code-switching, showing that language negotiation is key in the Galician healthcare system. The insights gained can inform healthcare professionals, policymakers, and language planners in developing strategies to improve communication. The study also provides contextual data for understanding the role of language in shaping social dynamics beyond the healthcare setting. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Developments in Galician Linguistics)
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28 pages, 3257 KiB  
Article
‘The Subversion of Dialects’: Changing Attitudes towards Rural Varieties of Galician
by Montserrat Recalde and Mauro Fernández
Languages 2024, 9(6), 204; https://doi.org/10.3390/languages9060204 - 2 Jun 2024
Viewed by 560
Abstract
The gheada and the seseo are the two pronunciations most stigmatised by the top-down standardising tradition of Galician from the mid-19th century. Social stereotypes of peasantry, ignorance, and vulgarity were built on them. Nowadays, those stereotypes are the basis for indexical pointing. These [...] Read more.
The gheada and the seseo are the two pronunciations most stigmatised by the top-down standardising tradition of Galician from the mid-19th century. Social stereotypes of peasantry, ignorance, and vulgarity were built on them. Nowadays, those stereotypes are the basis for indexical pointing. These pronunciations were outlawed from schools in the past. Today, despite having been considered standard by The Royal Galician Academy since 1982, they are almost absent from the classrooms, including those of Galician language and literature. This situation is detrimental to the linguistic capital of its users as compared to that of standard speakers. Nonetheless, since the end of the 20th century, there has been a social resignification of the gheada and seseo, symbolically used to express authenticity, ethnolinguistic adherence, and/or socio-political and cultural resistance. Currently, the emergence of vernacular language ideologies (VLIs) counterbalances the weight of standard language ideologies (SLIs) on these phenomena. This article analyses the linguistic attitudes of a sample of young people towards these two dialectal varieties as opposed to the standard pronunciations. It also identifies the indexical associations of contrasting varieties and their evolution over time. For this purpose, the matched-guise technique in combination with semantic differential scales (SDSs) has been applied. The results show that whereas standard pronunciations index social success, dialectal pronunciations index solidarity. However, while the standard indexical values are very stable, a rise in dialectal ratings is observed over fifteen years, which means an improvement of the attitudes towards them. As in other European minority languages, this phenomenon indicates a process of value levelling of the linguistic varieties and the growing weight of the VLIs in late modernity in Galicia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Developments in Galician Linguistics)
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15 pages, 356 KiB  
Article
Galician Perfective Periphrases among Complex Predicates: Degrees of Grammaticalization and the Possibility of a Perfect Tense
by Natalia Jardón
Languages 2024, 9(6), 196; https://doi.org/10.3390/languages9060196 - 27 May 2024
Viewed by 817
Abstract
The so-called perífrasis perfectivas in Galician present the action as concluded or realized. This particular aspectual feature constitutes the common ground for an otherwise heterogeneous set of constructions, ranging from rematar de ‘finish’+ infinitive (e.g., rematóu de beber ‘(s/he) finished drinking’) to ter [...] Read more.
The so-called perífrasis perfectivas in Galician present the action as concluded or realized. This particular aspectual feature constitutes the common ground for an otherwise heterogeneous set of constructions, ranging from rematar de ‘finish’+ infinitive (e.g., rematóu de beber ‘(s/he) finished drinking’) to ter ‘have’ + participle (e.g., teñen ido ‘(they) have gone (Rep.)’). This work provides a critical assessment of their syntactic and semantic properties in cases where the participle may not show agreement. This is the case for periphrases built on three auxiliaries: ter, levar, and dar, of which ter + participle stands out as the most grammaticalized one. The case of ter is further investigated in relation to European Portuguese (EP) and Brazilian Portuguese (BP), where ter + participle is considered a fully-fledged perfect tense. Additionally, the use of these periphrases in areas where Spanish is also present is evaluated from a contact perspective. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Developments in Galician Linguistics)
12 pages, 407 KiB  
Article
Mood Alternation with Adverbs of Uncertainty in Galician: A Multifactorial Analysis
by Vítor Míguez
Languages 2024, 9(6), 195; https://doi.org/10.3390/languages9060195 - 24 May 2024
Viewed by 609
Abstract
This study investigates the factors that significantly constrain mood selection in Galician within uncertainty adverb constructions, applying a logistic regression model. This analysis identified several significant factors affecting the choice between the indicative and subjunctive moods, including the temporal context of the clause, [...] Read more.
This study investigates the factors that significantly constrain mood selection in Galician within uncertainty adverb constructions, applying a logistic regression model. This analysis identified several significant factors affecting the choice between the indicative and subjunctive moods, including the temporal context of the clause, the preceding adverb, and the interaction of fictional and nonfictional registers with the verb type of the predicate and the gender of the speaker/writer. Time reference and the preceding adverb emerged as primary factors conditioning mood choice, with present and future time frames and adverbs encoding weaker epistemic values significantly predisposing toward the subjunctive mood. This study also highlighted the influence of the gender of the speaker/writer, demonstrating the preference of women toward the indicative mood in fictional texts. Verb type and register interact in complex ways that only partially align with previous findings. The results of the present study contribute to a deeper understanding of syntactic variation in Galician, adding to a growing body of quantitative research on Galician grammar. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Developments in Galician Linguistics)
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18 pages, 392 KiB  
Article
Language Ideologies and Linguistic Practices of Transgenerational Return Migrants in Galicia
by Nicola Bermingham and Carme Silva-Domínguez
Languages 2024, 9(6), 187; https://doi.org/10.3390/languages9060187 - 21 May 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 616
Abstract
This article explores transgenerational return migration to Galicia, Spain, focusing on participants of the Scholarships for Outstanding Youth Abroad (BEME) programme. It examines how descendants of Galician emigrants, primarily grandchildren and great-grandchildren of Galician emigrants to Latin America, engage with the Spanish and [...] Read more.
This article explores transgenerational return migration to Galicia, Spain, focusing on participants of the Scholarships for Outstanding Youth Abroad (BEME) programme. It examines how descendants of Galician emigrants, primarily grandchildren and great-grandchildren of Galician emigrants to Latin America, engage with the Spanish and Galician languages. Drawing on semi-structured interviews with 30 participants, the article explores participants’ language ideologies regarding Galician as a minoritised language and Spanish as a global language. This article highlights the role of language as a symbolic resource in transgenerational return migration, offering a sociolinguistic perspective to the understanding of this migration phenomenon. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Developments in Galician Linguistics)
13 pages, 370 KiB  
Article
Variant Choices of Future Time Reference in Galician: The Grammaticalization of [haber (de) + infinitive] as a Window to Diachronic Change
by Esther L. Brown and Javier Rivas
Languages 2024, 9(4), 142; https://doi.org/10.3390/languages9040142 - 15 Apr 2024
Viewed by 918
Abstract
Compared to neighboring Romance languages, Galician currently maintains a more ubiquitous usage of the construction [haber (present) + (de) + infinitive] as a future marker in variation with the periphrastic construction with ir ‘go’ and the morphological [...] Read more.
Compared to neighboring Romance languages, Galician currently maintains a more ubiquitous usage of the construction [haber (present) + (de) + infinitive] as a future marker in variation with the periphrastic construction with ir ‘go’ and the morphological future. We examine this under-studied construction to gain a better understanding of Galician grammar and also contribute new data with which to consider diachronic change regarding the grammaticalization of the future from obligation markers. We conduct a variationist analysis of 1589 tokens of future forms in recorded conversations (CORILGA) in order to determine the frequency of usage, patterns of variation, linguistic conditioning and degree of grammaticalization of the periphrastic forms with haber and ir in contrast to the morphological variant. We find evidence to suggest that the periphrastic construction with haber is highly grammaticalized as a future marker and we identify factors of the production context that modulate the grammaticalization process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Developments in Galician Linguistics)
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