Special Issue "Landscape Planning as a Catalyst for Sustainable Development"

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2021) | Viewed by 5826

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Luís Carlos Loures
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
VALORIZA - Research Centre for Endogenous Resource Valorization, Polytechnic Institute of Portalegre, 7300 Portalegre, Portugal
Interests: environmental impact on mediterranean ecosystems;sustainable management; environmental planning; landscape architecture; spatial and environmental planning; low-density planning; climate change adaptation; circular economy
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I invite you to submit your paper for open access publication in this Special Issue of Land, “Landscape Planning as a Catalyst for Sustainable Development”. This Special Issue takes the landscape planning–sustainable development nexus as a starting point and focuses on the multiple ways in which access and rights to land relate to planning and management processes.

In fact, to date, intensive land-use change has been either considered a source of richness or a serious problem to landscape sustainability. In this scenario, it must be noted that although productive and urban landscapes play a very important role in modern society, the generally negative environmental consequences of such land-uses on other economic and ecological functions require special attention in order to be considered as sustainable. The new environmental paradigms associated with the globalization of production and the progressive climate change will certainly intensify the entropy and the instability in most of the existing landscapes. In this regard, this Special Issue aims to highlight a body of knowledge related to the discussion of the opportunities and challenges associated to the development of “new” sustainable landscapes.

Based on this, in addition to the aforementioned subjects, the envisioned special issue intends to cover a wide range of topics related to landscape design and sustainability, assessing the impact of different land-uses and landscape management strategies on landscape resilience and sustainability.

Papers submitted to this Special Issue will undergo an impartial peer review process with the aim of rapid and broad dissemination of research findings and results.

Dr. Luís Loures
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • landscape architecture
  • planning
  • environment
  • agronomy
  • ecosystem services
  • post-industrial landscapes

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Article
Measuring Multi-Faceted Land Use Efficiency of Large-Scale Urban Agglomerations under Multi-Scale Drivers: Evidence from China
Land 2022, 11(1), 91; https://doi.org/10.3390/land11010091 - 06 Jan 2022
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Abstract
Although urban agglomerations are vital sites for national economic development, comprehensive multidimensional investigations of their performance are lacking. Accordingly, we examined land use efficiency from multiple perspectives in two of the earliest developed and most advanced urban agglomerations in China, the Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei (BTH) [...] Read more.
Although urban agglomerations are vital sites for national economic development, comprehensive multidimensional investigations of their performance are lacking. Accordingly, we examined land use efficiency from multiple perspectives in two of the earliest developed and most advanced urban agglomerations in China, the Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei (BTH) region and the Yangtze River Delta (YRD), using different metrics, including trans-regional drivers of the spatial allocation of construction land. We found that: (1) The land use efficiency of urban agglomerations was context dependent. Whereas it was higher in the Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei region for population density per unit area of construction land than in the Yangtze River Delta region, the opposite was true for gross domestic production. Thus, a single aspect did not fully reflect the land use efficiency of urban agglomerations. (2) The land use efficiency of the two urban agglomerations was also scale dependent, and in the Yangtze River Delta region, the use of multiple metrics induced variations between aggregate and local measures. Median values for the land use efficiency of cities within an urban agglomeration were the most representative for comparative purposes. (3) The drivers of the spatial allocation of construction land were trans-regional. At the regional scale, most topographical factors were restrictive. Major regional transport networks significantly influenced the occurrence of construction land near them. Dominant cities and urban areas within each city exerted remote effects on non-dominant cities and rural areas. In principle, the median value can be considered a promising metric for assessing an urban agglomeration’s performance. We suggest that stringent management of land use in areas located along regional rail tracks/roadways may promote sustainable land use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Landscape Planning as a Catalyst for Sustainable Development)
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Article
Hydrogeomorphology as a Tool in the Evolutionary Analysis of the Dynamic Landscape—Application to Larrodrigo, Salamanca, Spain
Land 2021, 10(12), 1407; https://doi.org/10.3390/land10121407 - 20 Dec 2021
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Abstract
Evolutionary analysis of the fluvial landscape provides relevant inputs for the environmental management of a territory, in such a way that the understanding of the dynamics of fluvial spaces becomes a preponderant factor in the definition of protection and management strategies. Although the [...] Read more.
Evolutionary analysis of the fluvial landscape provides relevant inputs for the environmental management of a territory, in such a way that the understanding of the dynamics of fluvial spaces becomes a preponderant factor in the definition of protection and management strategies. Although the development of geographic information systems is a step forward in the study of the landscape, it is necessary to establish methodological frameworks that make remote sensing techniques available at multiple spatio-temporal scales, especially in basins with high levels of intervention. In the present study, we develop a methodology for the analysis of the fluvial landscape development in the last century of a highly modified water body, through the detailed study of hydrogeomorphic elements, using remote sensing techniques including high-density surface data (LiDAR) and historical aerial imageries; when supported by fieldwork, these allow for the identification of the sequence of sedimentation–erosion zones, differentiating in detail the zones denominated as areas of current erosion, accretion zones, and historical erosion zones. An application of the methodology was carried out in the Larrodrigo stream, located in Salamanca, Spain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Landscape Planning as a Catalyst for Sustainable Development)
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Article
Using SERVQUAL Method to Assess Tourist Service Quality by the Example of the Silesian Museum Established on the Post-Mining Area
Land 2020, 9(9), 333; https://doi.org/10.3390/land9090333 - 21 Sep 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1363
Abstract
The increasing role of the tourism industry in the global economy and the growing competition makes it necessary to ensure constant performance and continually improve quality. The paper draws attention to the necessity of conducting research on tourist attraction quality also in post-industrial [...] Read more.
The increasing role of the tourism industry in the global economy and the growing competition makes it necessary to ensure constant performance and continually improve quality. The paper draws attention to the necessity of conducting research on tourist attraction quality also in post-industrial areas which have become attractive tourist sites. It is emphasised that industrial tourism is a new yet quickly developing phenomenon in Poland, which compels managers to differentiate their service range and improve quality standards. The paper employs the SERVQUAL (SERvice QUALity) method to assess the quality of tourist services as a theoretical instrument to measure overall visitor satisfaction. The subject of the research was the Silesian Museum, which is result of reclamation and revitalisation of the inactive “Katowice” Hard Coal Mine. The article presents an empirical verification of the methodology which was modified for the purposes of the research subject. The Museum is considered to be one of the most important cultural centres and a crucial element of the social life of the Silesia region where mining activity has been carried out for centuries. Thirty young people from different continents participated in the survey. The results demonstrated that the expectations of the visitors were not met in three cases only which suggests a very high quality of the Silesian Museum. Moreover, the presented results show increasing capabilities and opportunities to maintain a high quality of services in the studied facility. The findings indicate that the appropriately modified SERVQUAL methodology is a valuable and simple tool to evaluate visitor satisfaction. The results of the evaluation of the Silesian Museum services will be presented to the facility managers. Further research will be carried out after the improvement and implementation of the next stage of the Museum’s development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Landscape Planning as a Catalyst for Sustainable Development)
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Article
Land-Use Changes in the Canary Archipelago Using the CORINE Data: A Retrospective Analysis
Land 2020, 9(7), 232; https://doi.org/10.3390/land9070232 - 17 Jul 2020
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 1575
Abstract
The relationships between territorial governance and the pursuit of sustainable development are evidenced to be critical. Exploratory tools, like Geographic Information Systems (GIS), enable us to comprehend the patterns, dynamics, and parameters of land-use changes over the years. The results from such studies [...] Read more.
The relationships between territorial governance and the pursuit of sustainable development are evidenced to be critical. Exploratory tools, like Geographic Information Systems (GIS), enable us to comprehend the patterns, dynamics, and parameters of land-use changes over the years. The results from such studies could be used in the design of a sustainable territorial governance strategy. Contextually, a study has been conducted based on the changes that occurred in land uses in the Canary Archipelago in the years 1990, 2000, 2012, and 2018 using CORINE (Coordination of Information on the Environment) data. Even if most of the land uses have been stable over the analyzed period, the investigation shows a decrease in agricultural areas. By contrast, it is possible to verify an increase in semi-natural areas and urban agglomerations. Moreover, the authors believe that an assessment of the land-use changes on these ultra-peripheral areas will also enable us to disclose some obstacles and opportunities for sustained development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Landscape Planning as a Catalyst for Sustainable Development)
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Review

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Review
Measuring Overtourism: A Necessary Tool for Landscape Planning
Land 2021, 10(9), 889; https://doi.org/10.3390/land10090889 - 25 Aug 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 749
Abstract
The tourism debate prior to the COVID-19 pandemic was dominated by the problems inherent in overtourism, reflecting an inadequate land management. Although publications on overtourism have grown exponentially in recent years, its scientific study still has major shortcomings, particularly with regard to measurement. [...] Read more.
The tourism debate prior to the COVID-19 pandemic was dominated by the problems inherent in overtourism, reflecting an inadequate land management. Although publications on overtourism have grown exponentially in recent years, its scientific study still has major shortcomings, particularly with regard to measurement. With the aim of overcoming this insufficiency, we have carried out a review of the literature (using the mapping review method) and, based on its conclusions, we have drawn up a proposal to systematise the measurement of overtourism by combining several tools: indicators, surveys, interviews, and other tools linked to the Internet and social networks. The results of the research make a contribution to the expansion of the literature on the topic and may have important practical implications in formulating effective land-use policies by guiding policy makers in the management of overtourism. They could be of use in both the early detection of overtourism and the design of policies that prevent and/or detect situations of risk and that correct existing problems. This is especially relevant in the current international context to implement the effective transition to a responsible tourism model post-COVID-19. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Landscape Planning as a Catalyst for Sustainable Development)
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