Special Issue "New Methodological and Theoretical Approaches to Spatial Analysis in Landscape Dynamics"

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X). This special issue belongs to the section "Land Systems and Global Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2023 | Viewed by 1672

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Corinna Jenal
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Urban and Regional Development (SRE), University of Tübingen, Geschwister-Scholl-Platz, 72074 Tübingen, Germany
Interests: social constructivist landscape research; social acceptance of landscape change; urban–landscape hybridity; industrial heritage and change; energy transition
Dr. Karsten Berr
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Urban and Regional Development (SRE), University of Tübingen, Geschwister-Scholl-Platz, 72074 Tübingen, Germany
Interests: transdisciplinary landscape research; landscape architecture theory; planning ethics; landscape morality, ethics and aesthetics; landscape conflicts

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Landscapes, as with other phenomena of the world, are subject to constant change. In the course of increasing digitization processes, this change no longer extends only within the analog world but increasingly also takes place in the virtual world (VR). The ubiquity of change therefore refers to two things: on the one hand, the physical foundations of what can be understood by landscapes, on the other hand, the different ways of seeing and interpreting landscapes, which are strongly tied back to historical, social and individual contexts. The study of this change, which takes place in the field of tension between these two dimensions, has produced a variety of possible perspectives on landscapes (multiperspectivity) in the course of the study of 'landscape', especially in the last 200 years or so, such as different approaches from the most diverse disciplines, such as planning, geography and social as well as cultural sciences, which are constantly evolving.

Accordingly, this Special Issue aims to reflect this diversity and to gain new perspectives, i.e., new methodological and theoretical approaches, on changes in the physical as well as virtual foundations of landscapes and changing ways of perceiving, interpreting and evaluating what can be socially understood as a 'landscape'.

In this Special Issue original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Landscape changes in the context of multiple processes of transformation in modern societies (for example, renewable energy, climate policy and sustainability).
  • Landscape changes in the context of natural processes and dynamics; for example, due to climate change and attempts to counteract these changes (i.e., research on heat-resistant plants, climate engineering, etc.).
  • Proposals for innovative methodological approaches to the scientific investigation of landscape dynamics, for example, using new technical approaches such as VR/AR.
  • Possibilities for the investigation of media–geographic approaches to changing landscapes.
  • Proposals of new complementary theoretical perspectives for the study of landscape change.

I/We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Corinna Jenal
Dr. Karsten Berr
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • theoretical approaches
  • methodological approaches
  • analog and virtual worlds
  • physical foundations of landscapes
  • perception, interpretation and evaluation of landscapes

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
From Flood Control System to Agroforestry Heritage System: Past, Present and Future of the Mulberry-Dykes and Fishponds System of Huzhou City, China
Land 2022, 11(11), 1920; https://doi.org/10.3390/land11111920 - 28 Oct 2022
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Abstract
Peri-urban traditional agroforestry systems are considered a priority at an international level, as they serve as a link connecting cities and rural areas, providing local food and ecosystem services for people living in the cities. The mulberry-dykes and fishponds system (MFS), located near [...] Read more.
Peri-urban traditional agroforestry systems are considered a priority at an international level, as they serve as a link connecting cities and rural areas, providing local food and ecosystem services for people living in the cities. The mulberry-dykes and fishponds system (MFS), located near Huzhou city (Zhejiang province, China), also has a key role in protecting the city from floods, as it developed as a consequence of the ancient flood control system created to protect local cities and villages from recurring floods. This system is recognized for its sustainability and for the strong functional interlinkages between the different components (mulberry trees, fishes, silkworms) by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), which included it into the Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS) Programme in 2017. The research intends to measure landscape transformation in the last 12 years and to evaluate the effectiveness of the inclusion into the GIAHS Programme for land use changes mitigation. In addition, an accurate discussion focusing on the analysis of local planning has been done to evaluate its capacity in protecting and valorizing the site. Results demonstrated that MFS has undergone major land use changes in the last years due to urban sprawl, the spread of solar panels (+7% in 2018–2021), and abandonment of the traditional mulberry-based system (−75% in 2009–2021). Other changes are related to the overall number of traditional fishponds (−81% in 2009–2018 and −33% in 2018–2021) and to their shape and size. Local planning tools are too sectorial, not enough integrated one another, and they do not consider the MFS as a single system. The study demonstrated that the inclusion in the GIAHS Programme is not sufficient itself to stop negative trends in the absence of adequate planning tools, even if it can contribute to slowing them down, but it would be crucial to integrate the GIAHS action plan and vision into local planning tools. Full article
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Article
Old, Lost, and Forgotten Rural Materialities: Old Local Irrigation Channels and Lost Local Walking Trails
Land 2022, 11(8), 1358; https://doi.org/10.3390/land11081358 - 20 Aug 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 688
Abstract
Geo-historical studies have essentially focused on analyzing the historical evolution of the landscape and the processes of material resistance of rural landscapes against the dynamics of rural change. Historical landscapes are cumulative life micro-worlds. In the present contribution, the historical evolution of lost [...] Read more.
Geo-historical studies have essentially focused on analyzing the historical evolution of the landscape and the processes of material resistance of rural landscapes against the dynamics of rural change. Historical landscapes are cumulative life micro-worlds. In the present contribution, the historical evolution of lost and disappeared rural roads and caceras—old local irrigation channels—is analyzed in a comparative way. The case studies were the Berbedillo river cacera system in the north of the province of Guadalajara and the Bustar path in the municipality of Bustarviejo in the province of Madrid. The methodology was based on a variety of research sources: written and archival documents, oral testimonies of the elderly, and micro-territorial recognition. The roads and caceras are lost but can continue to be represented, even if they can no longer be used for the life of rural communities. A new history of depopulation, restructuring, and loss is possible to (re)write based on spectral agrarian (im)materialities. Full article
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