Special Issue "Where Land Meets Sea: Terrestrial Influences on Coastal Environments"

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 January 2023 | Viewed by 4460

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Paulette Posen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Senior Risk Modeller, Centre for Environment, Fisheries & Aquaculture Science, Weymouth DT4 8UB, UK
Interests: environmental modelling and impact assessment; catchment management; climate change
Dr. Naomi Greenwood
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Marine Biogeochemist. Centre for Environment, Fisheries & Aquaculture Science, Lowestoft NR33 0HT, UK
Interests: nutrient and carbon transport and processing from catchment to marine environments; marine carbonate system; controls on marine oxygen in shelf seas
Dr. Michelle Devlin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Science Theme Lead, Environment and People, Centre for Environment, Fisheries & Aquaculture Science, Lowestoft NR33 0HT, UK
Interests: marine monitoring; water quality; catchment to coast functioning; policy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Carlos Campos
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Coastal and Freshwater Group, Cawthron Institute, 98 Halifax Street East, 7010 Nelson, New Zealand
Interests: water quality; environmental monitoring and assessment; wastewater treatment; environmental microbiology; marine pollution
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Characteristics of terrestrial environments and land-based activities often determine the quality, resilience, and health of coastal waters and ecosystems, yet much research, and many management and policy initiatives, still treat terrestrial, estuarine, and marine systems as separate entities, with limited regard to the linkages and exchanges between them. Elevated inputs of nutrients, sediments, and chemical and biological contaminants, from agriculture and industry, conurbations, and human activity, enter water courses and travel through river networks to the sea, impacting the environments through which they flow and affecting the health and resilience of the entire ecosystem, of which humans are a part. The UNESCO World Water Assessment Programme highlights the environmental burden of projected food production needs and the fact that more than 80% of sewage in developing countries is discharged untreated into water bodies. The ever-present pressure of climate change adds further uncertainty to the sustainability of land management choices, future terrestrial habitat and species distributions, and, by association, the resilience of the coastal margin and adjacent waters.

This Special Issue looks at the close relationship between land and coastal systems, examining the direct and indirect impacts of human populations and activity in river catchments and coastal areas, and how they influence, and are influenced by, the sea.

We welcome papers that consider “where land meets sea” from the perspectives of catchment management and coastal water quality, options for sustainable agriculture and aquaculture, food security and food safety, resilience of estuarine and coastal ecosystems, and aquatic animal and human health. Of particular interest are papers that focus on the interconnectedness of terrestrial and coastal marine systems and the interplay between human activity and the natural environment, highlighting the potential for integrated management to promote health and resilience across domains.

Dr. Paulette Posen
Dr. Naomi Greenwood
Dr. Michelle Devlin
Dr. Carlos Campos
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Land–sea interactions
  • Catchment management
  • Terrestrial discharge
  • Coastal resilience
  • Coastal water quality
  • Aquatic health
  • Aquatic food safety
  • Human health

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Communication
Performance of Storm Overflows Impacting on Shellfish Waters in England
Land 2022, 11(9), 1576; https://doi.org/10.3390/land11091576 - 15 Sep 2022
Viewed by 852
Abstract
Storm overflow (SO) discharges to shellfish growing waters are a concern for shellfish growers and may pose a health risk to consumers. We investigated the performance of permitted SOs with a shellfish water spill monitoring requirement against the design criterion of 10 spills [...] Read more.
Storm overflow (SO) discharges to shellfish growing waters are a concern for shellfish growers and may pose a health risk to consumers. We investigated the performance of permitted SOs with a shellfish water spill monitoring requirement against the design criterion of 10 spills per year (averaged over 10 years) used in England. Performance against this criterion over the period 2019–2021 differed between the five water companies whose data was analysed. Across all companies, over half of SOs spilled more frequently than this criterion (percentage greater than 10 spills: 52%, 55% and 57% for 2019, 2020 and 2021, respectively). The number of SOs with the monitoring requirement also differed considerably between the water companies and consequently some companies deal with a significantly higher ‘burden’ than others. The number of SOs spilling more than 100 times in a year also differed between water companies, from 0% (Wessex Water) to 16% (United Utilities). Discharges from SOs can lead to short-term reductions in water quality that may be missed by routine monitoring programmes using faecal indicator bacteria such as E. coli. Such discharges can lead to a higher incidence of norovirus in shellfish and thus potential illness in consumers. We conclude that site-specific impact assessments, supported by spill event-based monitoring, are required given the increased demands on sewerage networks from urban growth and climate change and the need to improve shellfish production area classifications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Where Land Meets Sea: Terrestrial Influences on Coastal Environments)
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Article
Spatial-Temporal Effect of Sea–Land Gradient on Land Use Change in Coastal Zone: A Case Study of Dalian City
Land 2022, 11(8), 1302; https://doi.org/10.3390/land11081302 - 12 Aug 2022
Viewed by 500
Abstract
Geographically, the coastal zone is a unit where the marine system and the terrestrial system intersect and have the closest relationship with human survival and development. The study of coastal-zone land use change is therefore of great significance in promoting the sustainable development [...] Read more.
Geographically, the coastal zone is a unit where the marine system and the terrestrial system intersect and have the closest relationship with human survival and development. The study of coastal-zone land use change is therefore of great significance in promoting the sustainable development of coastal areas in terms of resources and environment. However, the relationship between urban land use change and distance from the coastline is indeterminate in current research. This paper aims to assess the spatial and temporal characteristics of coastal land use change with the sea–land gradient, as well as to reveal the role of coastal ecosystems. The indices of the dynamic index, net transfer matrix, and aggregation index were measured in different coastal buffer zones quantitatively. A case study of Dalian between 2000 and 2015 indicates that Dalian’s urban construction land is distributed among the coastal zones with a high total and fast growth rate. The land use conversion direction varies significantly between different buffer zones, with [0, 2.5] km tilted mainly towards urban types and [10, Max] km tilted mainly towards rural areas. The aggregation of land use structure in Dalian fluctuated and increased year by year. As the distance from the coastline gets closer, land use is going to get more diverse. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Where Land Meets Sea: Terrestrial Influences on Coastal Environments)
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Article
Coastal Scenic Beauty and Sensitivity at the Balearic Islands, Spain: Implication of Natural and Human Factors
Land 2021, 10(5), 456; https://doi.org/10.3390/land10050456 - 24 Apr 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2219
Abstract
Coastal areas globally are facing a significant range of environmental stresses, enhanced by climate change-related processes and a continuous increase of human activities. The economic benefits of tourism are well-known for coastal regions, but, very often, conflicts arise between short-term benefits and long-term [...] Read more.
Coastal areas globally are facing a significant range of environmental stresses, enhanced by climate change-related processes and a continuous increase of human activities. The economic benefits of tourism are well-known for coastal regions, but, very often, conflicts arise between short-term benefits and long-term conservation goals. Among beach user preferences, five parameters of greater importance stand out from the rest, i.e., safety, facilities, water quality, litter and scenery; the latter is the main concern of this study. A coastal scenic evaluation was carried out in the Balearic Islands and focused on two major issues: coastal scenic beauty together with sensitivity to natural processes and human pressure. The archipelago is renowned as a top international coastal tourist destination that receives more than 13.5 million visitors (2019). Impressive landscape diversity makes the Balearics Islands an ideal field for this research. In total, 52 sites, respectively located in Ibiza (11), Formentera (5), Mallorca (18) and Menorca (18), were field-tested. In a first step, coastal scenic beauty was quantified using the coastal scenic evaluation system (CSES) method, based on the evaluation of 26 physical and human parameters, and using weighting matrices parameters and fuzzy logic mathematics. An evaluation index (“D”) was obtained for each site, allowing one to classify them in one of the five scenic classes established by the method. Twenty-nine sites were included in class I, corresponding to extremely attractive sites (CSES), which were mainly observed in Menorca. Several sound measures were proposed to maintain and/or enhance sites’ scenic value. In a second step, scenic sensitivity was evaluated using a novel methodological approach that makes possible the assessment of three different coastal scenic sensitivity indexes (CSSI), i.e., the natural sensitivity index NSI, the human sensitivity index HSI and the total sensitivity index TSI. Future climate change trends and projection of tourism development, studied at municipality scale, were considered as correction factors. All the islands showed places highly sensitive to environmental processes, while sensitivity to human pressure was essentially observed at Ibiza and Mallorca. Thereafter, sites were categorized into one of three sensitive groups established by the methodology. Results obtained are useful in pointing out very sensitive sceneries as well as limiting, preventing and/or anticipating future scenic degradation linked to natural and human issues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Where Land Meets Sea: Terrestrial Influences on Coastal Environments)
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