Special Issue "Economic Globalization, Telecoupling and Land Change"

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2015).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Darla K. Munroe
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geography, Ohio State University, 1036 Derby Hall, 154 N. Oval Mall, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
Interests: Economic restructuring and land-use change; Land-use modeling; Rural-urban interface

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Scholars are now studying land systems in a global context using such concepts as “telecoupling.” Research to date has recognized that local land systems may be undermined, and local people displaced, by economic globalization, or the increasing integration of production over space. The land-change community emphasizes the ways in which local people make decisions about natural resources given the opportunities and constraints that globalization presents. To date, we have paid comparatively less attention to exactly how global trade, financial institutions and agribusiness come together to create these new conditions.

Specific topics of current concern to land-system scientists include the role of new types of actors, such as firms and non-governmental organizations, the complexity of global production and land use, and how remittances shape land change. The ultimate ability of the land-change community to speak to key policy initiatives like Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) will depend on our ability to address these new spatially nimble actors and processes.

For this Special Issue, we are seeking papers that examine how economic globalization has promoted or undermined the social-environmental sustainability of land systems.

Papers can be one of three types:

(1)  Empirical pieces. Case studies illustrating the role of global trade, investment or transnational corporations in significant land change in one or more contexts;

(2)  Conceptual or theoretical contributions. Papers that seek to advance the conceptual frameworks used by land-change scientists to address these problems.

(3)  Normative studies. Contributions that focus on the winners and losers of recent land changes.

We will seek to be geographically representative, including works from major world regions (North America, Latin America, Middle East, Sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, Asia, Oceania).

If you wish to be included in this Issue, please submit a title, abstract (250 words) and 3-5 key words to [email protected] Please indicate the nature of your contribution (empirical, conceptual, normative) in your abstract.

Dr. Darla K. Munroe
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

  • land change
  • globalization
  • remittances
  • telecoupling
  • sustainability
  • agribusiness
  • trade

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Model-Based Synthesis of Locally Contingent Responses to Global Market Signals
Land 2015, 4(3), 807-841; https://doi.org/10.3390/land4030807 - 16 Sep 2015
Cited by 6
Abstract
Rural livelihoods and the land systems on which they depend are increasingly influenced by distant markets through economic globalization. Place-based analyses of land and livelihood system sustainability must then consider both proximate and distant influences on local decision-making. Thus, advancing land change theory [...] Read more.
Rural livelihoods and the land systems on which they depend are increasingly influenced by distant markets through economic globalization. Place-based analyses of land and livelihood system sustainability must then consider both proximate and distant influences on local decision-making. Thus, advancing land change theory in the context of economic globalization calls for a systematic understanding of the general processes as well as local contingencies shaping local responses to global signals. Synthesis of insights from place-based case studies is a path forward for developing such systematic knowledge. This paper introduces a generalized agent-based modeling framework for model-based synthesis to investigate the relative importance of structural versus agent-level factors in driving land-use and livelihood responses to changing global market signals. Six case-study sites that differed in environmental conditions, market access and influence, and livelihood settings were analyzed. Stronger market signals generally led to intensification and/or expansion of agriculture or increased non-farm labor, while changes in agents’ risk attitudes prompted heterogeneous local responses to global market signals. These results demonstrate model-based synthesis as a promising approach to overcome many of the challenges of current synthesis methods in land change science and identify generalized as well as locally contingent responses to global market signals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economic Globalization, Telecoupling and Land Change)
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Open AccessArticle
Land Change Regimes and the Evolution of the Maize-Cattle Complex in Neoliberal Mexico
Land 2015, 4(3), 754-777; https://doi.org/10.3390/land4030754 - 21 Aug 2015
Cited by 13
Abstract
How globalization impacts native land cover has become an important issue in studies addressing environmental change, which draw explicit attention to processes of cause and effect operating over significant distances. The literature shows that globalization constitutes an important underlying driver of both deforestation [...] Read more.
How globalization impacts native land cover has become an important issue in studies addressing environmental change, which draw explicit attention to processes of cause and effect operating over significant distances. The literature shows that globalization constitutes an important underlying driver of both deforestation and forest transition via demographic and economic phenomena such as migration and remittance flows. Yet, little is known about how global forces mold the spatial structure of agro-commodity production and how this impacts the balance of forces affecting land change at the meso-scale, within the boundaries of the nation-state. The research presented here fills this gap by examining production networks for Mexico, a large OECD country with complex land change dynamics that has recently experienced a dramatic opening to the world economy. Specifically, we consider how maize and beef commodity chains evolved over the past few decades into a highly interdependent maize-cattle complex, and suggest linkages to patterns of land change at the national scale. Using land cover maps for 1993, 2002, and 2012, at the national scale, governmental statistics and datasets, interviews with key informants, and field observations the article provides an analysis of the impact of neoliberal reforms on the changing geography of beef and maize production, and argues that this process underlies the evolution of Mexico’s land change regime, both before and after the NAFTA reforms. As such, the article presents an account, and a case for further research on the topic of how teleconnections are constituted by spatially-extensive food production networks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economic Globalization, Telecoupling and Land Change)
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Open AccessArticle
How Land Concessions Affect Places Elsewhere: Telecoupling, Political Ecology, and Large-Scale Plantations in Southern Laos and Northeastern Cambodia
Land 2015, 4(2), 436-453; https://doi.org/10.3390/land4020436 - 15 May 2015
Cited by 32
Abstract
Over the last decade considerable research has been conducted on the development and the impacts of large-scale economic land concessions for plantations in Laos and Cambodia. These studies have variously illustrated that concessions frequently result in serious negative impacts on local people and [...] Read more.
Over the last decade considerable research has been conducted on the development and the impacts of large-scale economic land concessions for plantations in Laos and Cambodia. These studies have variously illustrated that concessions frequently result in serious negative impacts on local people and the environment, often leading to dramatic transformations of landscapes and livelihoods. As important as this research has been, these studies have largely focused on the immediate impacts of the “enclosure” process associated with gaining access to land by investors. In this study we take a different approach, investigating the implications of large-scale land concessions in southern Laos and northeastern Cambodia with regard to places outside of actual concession areas, both within the countries where the concessions are located and beyond. These links have been referred to as “teleconnections” or “telecoupling”, and adopting a “telecoupling” approach allows us to focus on particular relations between land-use change in one location and land-use change elsewhere, either nearby or distant, as the result of large-scale plantation development, both during the early plantation development period, and later when plantations are productive. It also provides opportunities to engage with Land Change Science (LCS) through Political Ecology (PE). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economic Globalization, Telecoupling and Land Change)
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