Special Issue "Land Cover/Land-Use Changes in South and Southeast Asia"

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 August 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Thilde Bech Bruun
E-Mail
Guest Editor
University of Copenhagen, Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, Section of Geography, Øster Voldgade 10 1350 Copenhagen
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Senior Research Scientist Dr. Cornelia Hett
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Development and Environment (CDE), University of Bern, Switzerland
Interests: Land-use changes with remote sensing and social science data; Landscape-level approaches; Ecosystem services; Carbon; Participatory research approaches; Landscape mosaics; Large-scale land acquisitions; Private sector engagement
Prof. Dr. Rob Cramb
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australia
Tel. 61733652967
Interests: Agricultural development in Southeast Asia; Shifting cultivation; Rice-based farming systems; Smallholder commercial farming; Tree-crop development; Agricultural mechanization

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

South and Southeast Asia have experienced unprecedented land-cover and land-use changes in the past few decades, and the trend is likely to exacerbate in the coming years. These changes are driven by a complex set of factors, actions, and rationales operating at and across various scales and levels. For instance, distant drivers may initiate local changes in land use in South and Southeast Asia, and these changes may create feedbacks leading to new drivers, which again may trigger land-use changes in the same or a different area. The land-use outcomes may bring about positive or negative environmental and socio-economic changes—or both—at the local, regional, and even global level.

This Special Issue seeks to assemble papers that advance our knowledge about the drivers and effects of land-use changes in South and Southeast Asia. We are interested in papers that provide new empirical evidence, review papers, and meta-analyses of, for example, case studies from the region. We are particularly interested in papers that look at the causes and effects of land-use changes from a multi- or interdisciplinary perspective, from a landscape level to a regional level. Papers that introduce novel methods of assessment of land-use changes, new ways of analyzing data, or new ways of ascribing drivers or effects to land-use changes are also welcome. Finally, we would like to encourage submission of solution-oriented studies. We do not encourage submission of papers reporting results of single local cases.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Thilde Bech Bruun
Senior Research Scientist Dr. Cornelia Hett
Prof. Dr. Rob Cramb
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Land-use changes
  • drivers and impacts
  • landscape level
  • agricultural intensification
  • migration
  • livelihoods
  • boom crops
  • concessions
  • Carbon
  • REDD

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Mapping Land Cover Change over a 25-Year Period (1993–2018) in Sri Lanka Using Landsat Time-Series
Land 2020, 9(1), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/land9010027 - 16 Jan 2020
Abstract
Land use and land cover change (LULCC) are dynamic over time and space due to human and biophysical factors. Accurate and up-to-date LULCC information is a mandatory part of environmental change analysis and natural resource management. In Sri Lanka, there is a significant [...] Read more.
Land use and land cover change (LULCC) are dynamic over time and space due to human and biophysical factors. Accurate and up-to-date LULCC information is a mandatory part of environmental change analysis and natural resource management. In Sri Lanka, there is a significant temporal gap in the existing LULCC information due to the civil war that took place from 1983 to 2009. In order to fill this gap, this study presents a whole-country LULCC map for Sri Lanka over a 25-year period using Landsat time-series imagery from 1993 to 2018. The LandTrendr change detection algorithm, utilising the normalised burn ratio (NBR) and normalised difference vegetation index (NDVI), was used to develop spectral trajectories over this time period. A land cover change and disturbance map was created with random forest, using 2117 manually interpreted reference pixels, of which 75% were used for training and 25% for validation. The model achieved an overall accuracy of 94.14%. The study found that 890,003.52 hectares (ha) (13.5%) of the land has changed, while 72,266.31 ha (1%) was disturbed (but not permanently changed) over the last 25 years. LULCC was found to concentrate on two distinct periods (2000 to 2004 and 2010 to 2018) when social and economic stability allowed greater land clearing and investment opportunities. In addition, LULCC was found to impact forest reserves and protected areas. This new set of Sri Lanka-wide land cover information describing change and disturbance may provide a reference point for policy makers and other stakeholders to aid in decision making and for planning purposes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land Cover/Land-Use Changes in South and Southeast Asia)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Land Acquisition and Compensation on the Livelihoods of People in Quang Ninh District, Quang Binh Province: Labor and Income
Land 2019, 8(6), 91; https://doi.org/10.3390/land8060091 - 05 Jun 2019
Abstract
Researchers and development practitioners have an interest in the relationship between land and rural livelihoods. In this context, agricultural land is being increasingly lost because of developing industrialization in the provinces of Vietnam. The livelihoods of people, whose land is appropriated, are affected. [...] Read more.
Researchers and development practitioners have an interest in the relationship between land and rural livelihoods. In this context, agricultural land is being increasingly lost because of developing industrialization in the provinces of Vietnam. The livelihoods of people, whose land is appropriated, are affected. Therefore, this article investigates the impact of land acquisition and compensation on the labor and income of people when the State acquires their land to construct Industrial park projects. For the research methods, secondary data from select governmental agencies were gathered, and 50 households were interviewed to collect primary data. The results of this research indicated that although household livelihoods have been reconstructed after land acquisition, many issues are also emerging that may challenge equitable and sustainable development. These include a high proportion of households with insufficient employment, as well as those that are spending compensation money in ways that do not generate income. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land Cover/Land-Use Changes in South and Southeast Asia)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
What Awaits Myanmar’s Uplands Farmers? Lessons Learned from Mainland Southeast Asia
Land 2019, 8(2), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/land8020029 - 02 Feb 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Mainland Southeast Asia (MSA) has seen sweeping upland land use changes in the past decades, with transition from primarily subsistence shifting cultivation to annual commodity cropping. This transition holds implications for local upland communities and ecosystems. Due to its particular political regime, Myanmar [...] Read more.
Mainland Southeast Asia (MSA) has seen sweeping upland land use changes in the past decades, with transition from primarily subsistence shifting cultivation to annual commodity cropping. This transition holds implications for local upland communities and ecosystems. Due to its particular political regime, Myanmar is at the tail of this development. However, with Myanmar’s official strategy of agricultural commercialization and intensification, recent liberalization of the national economy, and influx of multinational agricultural companies, the effects on upland land transitions could come fast. We analyze the current state of upland land use in Myanmar in a socio-economic and political context, identify the dynamics in three indicator commodity crops (maize, cassava, and rubber), and discuss the state driven economic, tenurial and policy reforms that have occurred in upland areas of mainland Southeast Asian countries in past decades. We draw on these insights to contextualize our study and hypothesize about possible transition pathways for Myanmar. The transition to annual commodity cropping is generally driven by a range of socio-economic and technical factors. We find that land use dynamics for the three indicator crops are associated with market demand and thus the opening of national Southeast-Asian economies, research and development of locally suitable high yielding varieties (HYVs), and subsidies for the promotion of seeds and inputs. In contrast, promotion of HYVs in marginal areas and without adequate agricultural extension services may results in agricultural contraction and yield dis-intensification. The environmental impacts of the transition depend on the transition pathway, e.g., through large-scale plantation projects or smallholder initiatives. The agricultural development in upland MSA follows a clear diffusion pattern with transition occurring first in Thailand, spreading to Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos. While these countries point to prospects for Myanmar, we hypothesize that changes will come slow due to Myanmar’s sparse rural infrastructure, with uncertainty about tenure, in particular in areas still troubled by armed conflicts, and unwillingness of international investors to approach Myanmar given the recent setbacks to the democratization process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land Cover/Land-Use Changes in South and Southeast Asia)
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Open AccessArticle
Agricultural Land Conversion, Land Economic Value, and Sustainable Agriculture: A Case Study in East Java, Indonesia
Land 2018, 7(4), 148; https://doi.org/10.3390/land7040148 - 30 Nov 2018
Cited by 6
Abstract
Agricultural land conversion (ALC) is an incentive-driven process. In this paper, we further investigate the inter-relationship between land economic value (LEV) and ALC. To achieve this goal, we calculated the LEV for agricultural and non-agricultural (housing) uses in two areas of East Java, [...] Read more.
Agricultural land conversion (ALC) is an incentive-driven process. In this paper, we further investigate the inter-relationship between land economic value (LEV) and ALC. To achieve this goal, we calculated the LEV for agricultural and non-agricultural (housing) uses in two areas of East Java, Indonesia. The first area represents peri-urban agriculture, which is facing rapid urbanization and experiencing a high rate of ALC. The second area represents rural agriculture, with zero ALC. Furthermore, we identified factors affecting LEV in both areas for both uses. The results of this study show that agricultural land yielded a higher economic benefit in rural areas. Conversely, compared to agricultural land, housing in urban areas yields a value that is seven times higher. Moreover, agricultural land was shown to yield a higher profit after conversion. Ironically, a similar comparison does not exist in rural areas. Agricultural land yielded a value that was only 19% higher, indicating that agricultural land can easily be converted. This is also proven by the growing number of new urban cores in the periphery area. There are several factors affecting land economic value, such as agricultural use, soil fertility, accessibility, and cropping pattern, which are important variables. Meanwhile, the accessibility and location of peri-urban areas increase the land value for housing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land Cover/Land-Use Changes in South and Southeast Asia)
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Open AccessArticle
Large-Scale Land Concessions, Migration, and Land Use: The Paradox of Industrial Estates in the Red River Delta of Vietnam and Rubber Plantations of Northeast Cambodia
Land 2018, 7(2), 77; https://doi.org/10.3390/land7020077 - 15 Jun 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
This study investigated the implications of large-scale land concessions in the Red River Delta, Vietnam, and Northeast Cambodia with regard to urban and agricultural frontiers, agrarian transitions, migration, and places from which the migrant workers originated. Field interviews conducted near large-scale land concessions [...] Read more.
This study investigated the implications of large-scale land concessions in the Red River Delta, Vietnam, and Northeast Cambodia with regard to urban and agricultural frontiers, agrarian transitions, migration, and places from which the migrant workers originated. Field interviews conducted near large-scale land concessions for industrial estates in the Red River Delta and rubber plantations in Northeast Cambodia suggest that these radically different concessions are paradoxically leading to similar reconfigurations of livelihoods, labor patterns, and landscapes despite basic differences in these forms of land use. Both the Red River Delta and Northeast Cambodia are frontier environments undergoing extensive agrarian change with migration to work in the large-scale land concessions leading to a shortage of farm labor that anticipates changes in farming practices and farm livelihoods. These population movements will lead to further land-use changes as governments invest in the infrastructure and services needed to support increased population density in the receiving areas. In addition, labor migrations associated with these investments affect land-use practices both at the site of the concession and the places from where the migrants originate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land Cover/Land-Use Changes in South and Southeast Asia)
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