Special Issue "Sustainable Planning Processes to XXI Century Cities"

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (18 April 2022) | Viewed by 3123

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Miguel Amado
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CERIS—Civil Engineering Research and Innovation for Sustainability, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: architecture; urban planning; sustainable development; energy efficiency; smart cities; nature-based solutions
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Manuel Duarte Pinheiro
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
DECivil – Dept. Civil Engineering, Architecture and Georesources, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: sustainable construction; environmental impact; environmental management; sustainable tourism; sustainable management; lidera system

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The urbanization process in developing countries is taking on an emergency character in the 21st century. More than 90 percent of growth and new urban areas occur in developing countries, and it is predicted that by 2040 the total of these areas built in developing countries will triple. The economic growth that the urbanization process brings has multifaceted effects and covers more space than the developing regions themselves. Among the different generated impacts, climate change is the one that provides the most advantages for the planet and the quality of life of the population as a whole.

Achieving sustainable development processes where cities, countries, and regions complement and develop, is the challenge to be pursued within the framework of the SDGs.

The construction of programs for sustainable city planning, sustainable development, and management of the city can, together, broaden the objectives and make it possible for different actions and activities to address the local, regional, national, and global scales.

This Special Issue will contribute to the discussion on intervention models applicable to cities as a dynamic vector and management solutions for urban expansion areas to achieve a more inclusive society and without the risk of worsening the phenomena of poverty or effects of unanticipated consequences in decision-making processes.

Prof. Dr. Miguel Amado
Prof. Dr. Manuel Duarte Pinheiro
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainable land-use management
  • land system management
  • transition towards
  • sustainability in cities
  • developing countries
  • climate change

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
A Study on Cultural Urban Regeneration Using Modern Industrial Resources: Focusing on the Site-Specific Cultural Places of Gunsan, South Korea
Land 2021, 10(11), 1184; https://doi.org/10.3390/land10111184 - 04 Nov 2021
Viewed by 1094
Abstract
Gunsan is a port city located on the west coast of South Korea. After the port was opened in 1899, foreign concessions were formed there, and the modern city began to be formed in accordance with Japanese colonial policy. This region grew into [...] Read more.
Gunsan is a port city located on the west coast of South Korea. After the port was opened in 1899, foreign concessions were formed there, and the modern city began to be formed in accordance with Japanese colonial policy. This region grew into a modern port city by exporting rice harvested from the plains in the hinterland to Japan and managed and controlled commercial and industrial products of the surrounding area. Modern industrial facilities such as warehouses, financial, and administration facilities necessary for seizing the food resources for the colony were built there, and Gunsan developed as a hub city in the southwestern region of South Korea during the 1930s. However, after liberation in 1945, the number of modern industrial facilities in this area, which contained traces of Japanese imperialism, gradually declined. In the 2000s, as urbanisation accelerated, the problem of abandoned modern industrial facilities was raised, and the necessity of urban regeneration by utilizing the modern industrial facilities scattered in the original downtown of Gunsan emerged. The purpose of this paper is to examine the regional activation and cultural regeneration of the city by using modern industrial facilities as cultural places and targeting the case of Gunsan, which was developed as a colonial-planned city. In particular, through field studies, this paper examines those cultural spaces, utilising modern industrial facilities that contribute to the formation of regional uniqueness, mediate local communities, and create future values of sustainable cultural regeneration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Planning Processes to XXI Century Cities)
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Article
Are Local Authorities Building Their Capacity to Plan for Reduced Climate Impact? A Longitudinal Analysis of Swedish Comprehensive Plans
Land 2021, 10(6), 652; https://doi.org/10.3390/land10060652 - 18 Jun 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1190
Abstract
Spatial planning conducted by the local authorities has been identified as a key part of shaping carbon-neutral societies. Nevertheless, the question of whether local authorities are building their institutional capacity for integrating climate change mitigation aspects into spatial planning remains under-researched. This paper [...] Read more.
Spatial planning conducted by the local authorities has been identified as a key part of shaping carbon-neutral societies. Nevertheless, the question of whether local authorities are building their institutional capacity for integrating climate change mitigation aspects into spatial planning remains under-researched. This paper aims to fill this gap while also analysing the role of Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) in facilitating organisational learning. The methods employed were a longitudinal document analysis of Comprehensive Plans belonging to eight municipalities in Stockholm County, complemented by a focus group interview. A significant difference was identified, as the recently adopted Comprehensive Plans included more strategies for climate change mitigation and, to a greater extent, linked these strategies to reduced climate impact or energy efficiency than previously adopted Comprehensive Plans. However, numerous additional strategies could have been given further consideration in each studied Comprehensive Plan. Thus, this calls for more continuous and cyclical comprehensive planning processes to facilitate capacity building, primarily by being a vehicle for mobilising political support. Lastly, the findings indicate that SEA can lead to organisational learning of both single-loop and double-loop nature, where the latter can enable SEA to shape the planning process in a more profound and sustainability-oriented manner. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Planning Processes to XXI Century Cities)
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