Imbricating Socioeconomic and Environmental Data to Model Spatial Patterns of Peri-Urbanisation and Their Consequences

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X). This special issue belongs to the section "Land Socio-Economic and Political Issues".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 22 July 2024 | Viewed by 6198

Special Issue Editors

Department of Geography, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain
Interests: land use planning; landscape dynamics; earth observation applications
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Guest Editor
1. Department of Geography, Universitat de Girona, 17004 Girona, Spain
2. Institute of the Environment, Universitat de Girona, 17004 Girona, Spain
Interests: landscape management; global environmental change; political ecology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The complex process of urban growth is regarded as a spatial diffusion that implies socioeconomic and environmental changes caused by the interaction of many factors that may be simultaneously analysed given the high availability of quantitative tools. It contributes to climate change and pollution, among other issues, on local, regional, continental, and global scales. Therefore, promoting sustainable urbanization, limiting natural land consumption, and ensuring the well-being of populations have become policy targets for urban and landscape planners.

The spatial structure of urban areas and their growth patterns determine how the physical, socio-economic, and environmental characteristics change over time. These interrelationships play a major role in the daily life of urban dwellers and leads decision makers to seek better-informed choices for the sustainable planning of urban areas. Thus, a better understanding of the relationships between the spatial structure of urban areas and their socio-economic performance is of crucial relevance.

With the urban expansion based on dispersed settlement away from central urban areas, the traditional clear-cut division between urban and rural land has lost relevance, producing fragmented landscapes and transition zones between the city and the countryside with a mix of heterogeneous land uses, appearing as peri-urban expansion. Monitoring, quantifying, and characterizing the development of peri-urban areas enriches our understanding of past and present trends, provides evidence-based information, and supports decision-making processes, which allows us to anticipate unsustainable patterns and their potential consequences.

Therefore, this Special Issue focuses on the development of advanced quantitative processes to model the spatial patterns of peri-urban growth and their spatio-temporal consequences, imbricating socioeconomic and environmental data and including Earth observation (EO) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) techniques.

Dr. Pere Serra
Dr. Albert Llausàs
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • planned and unplanned urban expansion
  • land use change
  • decision support context
  • peri-urban growth and socioeconomic factors
  • socio-ecological interactions
  • spatio-temporal patterns
  • socio-economic and environmental data integration
  • peri-urban growth and landscape dynamics
  • peri-urban ecosystem degradation and quality of life
  • socio-environmental consequences

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 2863 KiB  
Article
Finding Sprawl Factors and Pirate Development: Based on Spatial Analysis of Population Grid Changes from 2014 to 2022 in SMA, South Korea
by Jaebin Lim and Myounggu Kang
Land 2023, 12(11), 1983; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12111983 - 27 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1229
Abstract
This comprehensive study explores urban sprawl in the Seoul Metropolitan Area (SMA), emphasizing its rising intensity and complexity despite previous public-led planning efforts. The study aims to visualize the spatial patterns of sprawl and identify influencing factors through spatial regression analysis using grid-based [...] Read more.
This comprehensive study explores urban sprawl in the Seoul Metropolitan Area (SMA), emphasizing its rising intensity and complexity despite previous public-led planning efforts. The study aims to visualize the spatial patterns of sprawl and identify influencing factors through spatial regression analysis using grid-based population data created from actual population distributions. This approach fills a gap in the existing literature by moving beyond administrative-level analyses prone to ecological fallacies. This study scrutinizes the dynamics of population change in Seoul Metropolitan Areas (SMAs) in Korea over a decade, focusing on the predatory aspect of urban sprawl. Using grid-based population data and spatial regression analysis, the study finds that population growth is concentrated in unplanned areas with high development benefits. Three key hypotheses were examined: (1) Areas with high development potential, measured through factors like land prices and development plans, attract predatory development; (2) Improved transportation infrastructure encourages population inflow; (3) Non-urban land use, especially bare land, attracts population growth. The results offer important policy implications, particularly for preparing areas with low land prices and improving transportation infrastructures for future population influxes. Monitoring is particularly crucial in areas where development plans are already in place or where there is a high percentage of bare land. Full article
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17 pages, 4265 KiB  
Article
Descriptive and Network Post-Occupancy Evaluation of the Urban Public Space through Social Media: A Case Study of Bryant Park, NY
by Bo Zhang, Yang Song, Dingyi Liu, Zhongzhong Zeng, Shuying Guo, Qiuyi Yang, Yuhan Wen, Wenji Wang and Xiwei Shen
Land 2023, 12(7), 1403; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12071403 - 13 Jul 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1648
Abstract
In modern cities, urban public spaces, such as parks, gardens, plazas, and streets, play a big role in people’s social activities, physical activities, mental health, and overall well-being. However, the traditional post-occupancy evaluation (POE) process for public spaces such as large urban parks [...] Read more.
In modern cities, urban public spaces, such as parks, gardens, plazas, and streets, play a big role in people’s social activities, physical activities, mental health, and overall well-being. However, the traditional post-occupancy evaluation (POE) process for public spaces such as large urban parks is extremely difficult, especially for long-term user experiences through observations, surveys, and interviews. On the other hand, social media has emerged as a major media outlet recording millions of user experiences to the public, which provides opportunities to inform how public space is used and perceived by users. Furthermore, unlike previous research that primarily presented descriptive characters of park programs, our study employs a network model to elucidate the interactive relationships and intensities among reported park elements, human activities, and experiences. This approach enables us to track the sources within the space that impact people’s perceptions, such as weather conditions, food options, and notable landmarks. The utilization of this network model opens avenues for future research to comprehensively investigate the factors shaping people’s perceptions in public open spaces. This study uses Bryant Park as an example and presents a new analytical framework, POSE (post-occupancy social media evaluation), to support long-term POE studies for large public spaces. Methods such as data automation, descriptive statistics, and social network analysis were used. The identification and quantification of meaningful park activities, scenes, and sentiments as well as their relationships will help optimize the design and management of park programs. Full article
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18 pages, 19432 KiB  
Article
Disentangling the Complexity of Regional Ecosystem Degradation: Uncovering the Interconnected Natural-Social Drivers of Quantity and Quality Loss
by Mengyuan Zhang, Shuaipeng Chen and Wenping Liu
Land 2023, 12(7), 1280; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12071280 - 23 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 939
Abstract
In the face of the combined effects of economic development and climate change, ecosystems are experiencing unprecedented pressures. It is imperative to diagnose changes in the quantity and quality of ecosystems, as well as identify the integrated natural and social driving mechanisms that [...] Read more.
In the face of the combined effects of economic development and climate change, ecosystems are experiencing unprecedented pressures. It is imperative to diagnose changes in the quantity and quality of ecosystems, as well as identify the integrated natural and social driving mechanisms that underlie these changes, in order to facilitate ecosystem restoration and maintenance. In this study, we analyzed the changes in forest, grassland, farmland, and water ecosystems in Hubei Province, China from 2000 to 2020. We examined the changes in ecosystem quantity by assessing their area, and for evaluating ecosystem quality, we utilized an ecosystem quality index (EQI). To further understand the integrated natural–social driving mechanisms behind the degradation of different types of ecosystems, we selected four natural factors and fifteen socio-economic factors, based on the influences of climate change and human activities. We employed stepwise regression models for analysis. Our study reveals significant degradation of farmland and grassland ecosystems in Hubei Province from 2000 to 2020, reducing by 5.16% and 82.46%, respectively. The water ecosystems have slightly decreased by 1.08%, while and the forest ecosystems has increased by 2.64%. The analysis further highlights that the total area of ecosystem quality degradation in Hubei Province reached 5.34%. Additionally, our findings indicate that human activities have a greater impact on the quantitative degradation of ecosystems, while climate change has a greater impact on the quality degradation of ecosystems. Specifically, the forestry output value has a significant negative impact on the area of farmland and grassland ecosystems, while rural per capita net income and fishery output value have a significant negative impact on water area. Annual precipitation and annual average temperature have a significant positive effect on the quality of ecosystems in the good-quality level, while ecosystems in the low-quality level are mainly influenced by annual evaporation. Our results provide valuable insights for policymakers seeking to restore and manage ecosystems effectively in order to promote regional sustainable development. Full article
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16 pages, 4480 KiB  
Article
Capacity Assessment of Urban Green Space for Mitigating Combined Sewer Overflows in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area
by Ryohei Ogawa, Ye Zhang, Vouchlay Theng, Zhongyu Guo, Manna Wang and Chihiro Yoshimura
Land 2023, 12(5), 993; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12050993 - 29 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1755
Abstract
Among the countermeasures against combined sewer overflow (CSO), urban green space (UGS) has been proven effective. However, few studies have examined the effects of UGS on CSO at the municipal scale. Therefore, this study aimed to develop a novel method for estimating the [...] Read more.
Among the countermeasures against combined sewer overflow (CSO), urban green space (UGS) has been proven effective. However, few studies have examined the effects of UGS on CSO at the municipal scale. Therefore, this study aimed to develop a novel method for estimating the relation of the area of UGS to CSO based on a case study in the Tokyo metropolitan area, which includes 10 sewersheds. This method integrates surface runoff modeling, sewer network analysis, and response analysis for estimating CSO and its response to the UGS proportion in each sewershed. This method is based on public data of topographic features, land-related data, and rainfall characteristics. Specifically, the CSO discharge is estimated to be the difference between the rainwater inflow to a terminal treatment plant and the maximum capacity of the sewer systems in each sewershed. The results revealed that the amount of CSO increases exponentially with the intensity of rainfall. In addition, a response analysis showed that the increase in UGS proportion would mitigate CSO in all sewersheds, particularly in the case where the UGS proportion increased from 5% to 10%. Overall, the present method allows us to estimate CSO in relation to rainfall pattern and the distribution of UGS in a sewershed without actual CSO records. Full article
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