Gender and Land

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X). This special issue belongs to the section "Land Socio-Economic and Political Issues".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 3010

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Environment & Society, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322-5215, USA
Interests: gender and agrarian change, conservation, and natural resource management & assets; migration and land-use change; smallholder livelihood dynamics
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Guest Editor
Department for the Observation and Study of the Land, Atmosphere and Ocean, El Colegio de la Frontera Sur (ECOSUR) Chetumal, Chetumal 77014, Mexico
Interests: smallholder livelihoods; migration; conservation; land use change; Mesoamerica
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Gender and its intersection with land processes are under-examined topics in land system science. These processes play essential roles in shaping human behavior and decision making, with potential multifaceted impacts on land dynamics. The aim of this Special Issue is to collect papers (original research articles and review papers) that provide insights into how gender impacts, and is impacted by, land dynamics. This Special Issue will welcome manuscripts that employ diverse methodologies, are based on research from all continents, and address a variety of gender–land themes, including, but not limited to, the following:

  • Gendered land tenure, access, and/or control;
  • Gender in land use decision making;
  • Gendered migration and land change;
  • Gender, climate change, and land;
  • Gender, land, and generational shifts;
  • Impacts of land change on gender systems;
  • Intersectionality in the land system context;
  • Differential impacts of land-related policies and programs.

We look forward to receiving your original research articles and reviews.

Prof. Dr. Claudia A. Radel
Dr. Birgit Schmook
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • gender and agriculture
  • gender and climate change
  • gender and land tenure
  • gender and land use
  • intersectionality and land

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 1781 KiB  
Article
Tenure Security Perception Patterns among Amazonian Communities in Peru: Gender and Ethnicity
by Zoila A. Cruz-Burga, María de los Ángeles La Torre-Cuadros, Iliana Monterroso and Anne M. Larson
Land 2024, 13(6), 760; https://doi.org/10.3390/land13060760 - 28 May 2024
Viewed by 325
Abstract
This study delves into perceptions of land and forest tenure (in)security among Indigenous and mestizo populations in the Peruvian Amazon. Despite all having collective lands, the selected communities vary in their formalisation processes. This research seeks to enhance comprehension of tenure security perceptions [...] Read more.
This study delves into perceptions of land and forest tenure (in)security among Indigenous and mestizo populations in the Peruvian Amazon. Despite all having collective lands, the selected communities vary in their formalisation processes. This research seeks to enhance comprehension of tenure security perceptions in the Peruvian Amazon by investigating sources of security and insecurity across key tenure components. A combination of descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate analyses is employed, based on fieldwork conducted between July 2015 and December 2017 in 22 Native and Peasant Communities in Loreto and Madre de Dios, utilising 1006 intra-household surveys, 52 in-depth interviews, and 44 focus group discussions. The results reveal similarities and differences in (in)security sources between titled and untitled communities. The study also explores the influence of gender and ethnicity on these perceptions, finding ethnicity-based variation in security perception over the past 20 years (1995–2015). Recognising these differences in perception is critical for assessing the robustness of exercising acquired collective rights. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender and Land)
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20 pages, 445 KiB  
Article
Study of the Impact of Rural Land Transfer on the Status of Women in Rural Households
by Mingyong Hong, Donglai Zhou and Lei Lou
Land 2024, 13(1), 107; https://doi.org/10.3390/land13010107 - 19 Jan 2024
Viewed by 950
Abstract
While the status of rural women in the family has undergone changes, rural land transfer has brought about transformations in both rural production and daily life. This paper adopts the perspective of rural land transfer, follows the research track of Marx and Engels’s [...] Read more.
While the status of rural women in the family has undergone changes, rural land transfer has brought about transformations in both rural production and daily life. This paper adopts the perspective of rural land transfer, follows the research track of Marx and Engels’s theory of women, and based on the theoretical research of the changes in the status of modern women in the family, constructs a framework for analyzing the status of women in rural families. Drawing on the data from the 2014 China Family Panel Studies (CFPS2014), this article utilizes OLS (Ordinary Least Square) and ordered logit models to explore the impact of rural land transfer on the status of women in rural households. The study reveals the following findings: Initially, rural land transfer-out improves women’s household decision-making power and enhances the status of women in rural households. The reliability of these results is further confirmed through robustness tests and endogeneity discussions. Secondly, the heterogeneity analysis indicates that the transfer of agricultural land promotes the status of women in rural households in nonmajor grain-producing areas more than women in major grain-producing areas. The reason is that women in major grain-producing areas lack off-farm employment opportunities compared with women in non-major grain-producing areas and the main grain producing areas may have a strong patriarchal cultural atmosphere. Thirdly, the analysis of mechanisms indicates that rural land transfer-out improves the status of women in rural households by augmenting their independent income. Conversely, rural land transfer-in increases women’s private labor and decreases their independent income without promoting their family status. The study sheds light on rural women’s empowerment, the improvement of intra-household bargaining power, and the comprehensive development of rural women. The conclusion of this paper provides a new understanding and some recommendations for us to explore the change of rural women’s status in the family. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender and Land)
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19 pages, 751 KiB  
Article
Employment of Land-Expropriated Farmers: The Effects of Land Expropriation and Gender Difference
by Yue Wang, Dengjiao Liao, Bin Yan and Xinhai Lu
Land 2023, 12(10), 1955; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12101955 - 23 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1230
Abstract
The employment inequality between males and females in the context of land expropriation is not conducive for land-expropriated farmers to earn a sustainable livelihood. In this study, based on the data of two waves of household surveys, the “Chinese Family Panel Study” in [...] Read more.
The employment inequality between males and females in the context of land expropriation is not conducive for land-expropriated farmers to earn a sustainable livelihood. In this study, based on the data of two waves of household surveys, the “Chinese Family Panel Study” in 2016 and 2018, the PSM-DID method is used to test the effects of land expropriation on the employment behavior of the rural labor force, and the heterogeneous results of men’s and women’s employment behaviors are analyzed. The following conclusions are drawn. Land expropriation significantly reduces the employment probability of the labor force, encouraging the rural labor force to withdraw from the labor market voluntarily; land expropriation significantly shortens the employment distance of the labor force overall, promoting the urbanization of the rural labor force in the vicinity; land expropriation has a greater impact on the unemployment of the female labor force than that of the male labor force, and it increases the employment distance of males and reduces that of females, promoting the return of females’ labor to the family. The policy significance of this study is to attach importance to the long-term sustainable livelihoods of rural households and the employment equality of males and females in urbanization. Findings suggest family–friendly compensation for land expropriation should be formulated, rural construction land should be allowed to enter the market instead of being expropriated, and cooperation between county and developed regions should be encouraged for the creation of more jobs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender and Land)
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