Special Issue "Fungi: What Have We Learned From Omics?"

A special issue of Journal of Fungi (ISSN 2309-608X). This special issue belongs to the section "Fungal Genomics, Genetics and Molecular Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Ana Cristina Esteves
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CESAM and Department of Biology, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: fungal interaction with the environment and hosts; marine fungi; fungi as biocontrol agents; bioactive compounds from fungi

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fungi have been long referred to as an understudied and under-understood group of organisms. Fungi are also described as being excellent producers of compounds with activities that can be used in numerous industries, from the food industry to agriculture and health industries. Last but definitely not least, some species are pathogenic to humans (luckily not that many), other animals, plants, and virtually to all eukaryotes.

Characterizing a fungus is still a challenge: fungi are diverse in nature, in lifestyles, and in terms of many other characteristics. The advent of omics—from genomics to metabolomics—brought many promises of elucidating the molecular mechanisms that govern fungi physiology. This Special Issue aims to reveal how and what omics have contributed to unravel the fungi complexity. We welcome research and review manuscripts in which omics are used to understand (but are not restricted to): fungal interactions with the environment/hosts, infection or biocontrol mechanisms, and molecular networks that govern the adaptation to new environments or the production of new compounds.

Dr. Ana Cristina Esteves
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Fungi is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fungi
  • genomics
  • transcriptomics
  • proteomics
  • metabolomics

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Review
Application of Metabolomics in the Study of Starvation-Induced Autophagy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A Scoping Review
J. Fungi 2021, 7(11), 987; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof7110987 - 19 Nov 2021
Viewed by 182
Abstract
This scoping review is aimed at the application of the metabolomics platform to dissect key metabolites and their intermediates to observe the regulatory mechanisms of starvation-induced autophagy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Four research papers were shortlisted in this review following the inclusion and [...] Read more.
This scoping review is aimed at the application of the metabolomics platform to dissect key metabolites and their intermediates to observe the regulatory mechanisms of starvation-induced autophagy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Four research papers were shortlisted in this review following the inclusion and exclusion criteria. We observed a commonly shared pathway undertaken by S. cerevisiae under nutritional stress. Targeted and untargeted metabolomics was applied in either of these studies using varying platforms resulting in the annotation of several different observable metabolites. We saw a commonly shared pathway undertaken by S. cerevisiae under nutritional stress. Following nitrogen starvation, the concentration of cellular nucleosides was altered as a result of autophagic RNA degradation. Additionally, it is also found that autophagy replenishes amino acid pools to sustain macromolecule synthesis. Furthermore, in glucose starvation, nucleosides were broken down into carbonaceous metabolites that are being funneled into the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. The ribose salvage allows for the survival of starved yeast. Moreover, acute glucose starvation showed autophagy to be involved in maintaining ATP/energy levels. We highlighted the practicality of metabolomics as a tool to better understand the underlying mechanisms involved to maintain homeostasis by recycling degradative products to ensure the survival of S. cerevisiae under starvation. The application of metabolomics has extended the scope of autophagy and provided newer intervention targets against cancer as well as neurodegenerative diseases in which autophagy is implicated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fungi: What Have We Learned From Omics?)
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