Special Issue "New Perspectives in Sustainable Aquaculture"

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Marine Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 September 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Caterina Longo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biology, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Bari, Italy
Interests: taxonomy and ecology of Porifera from different marine environments (marine caves, lagoons, shallow and deep sea); biodiversity and biogeography of Italian and Mediterranean Porifera; macrobenthic marine alien species; rearing, restoking and restoring of sponges of commercial and/or conservation importance; use of filter-feeder benthic invertebrates as bioremediators in marine environment; marine zoo-remediation in Integrated MultiTrophic Aquaculture systems; mapping and monitoring of zoobenthic species and benthic habitats of high conservation importance; mediterranean bioconstructions
Dr. Cataldo Pierri
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biology, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Bari, Italy
Interests: marine alien species; structural and functional marine biodiversity; conservation biology; marine biocostructions; marine fouling; marine invertebrate rearing
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The recent, rapid spread of mariculture requires the development of new approaches aimed at measuring, controlling, and reducing the impact of this activity in the marine environment.

Mariculture produces high levels of waste (feces, food residues, metabolites, etc.) that could cause strong environmental imbalances with negative consequences for the surrounding environment, both in the water column and, especially, at the seabed level, harbouring soft- and hard-substrate communities.

In this context and from a circular economy perspective, the multi-trophic polyculture of fishes with organisms with extractive capabilities has considerable environmental and social potential, especially if species (invertebrates and/or algae) with potentially high commercial value are co-cultured.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to bring together contributions on biologically and ecologically oriented methodologies and approaches to measure, control, and minimize the potential impacts of marine aquaculture.

In particular, topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Bioremediation
  • Zooremediation
  • Integrated multitrophic aquaculture
  • Innovative solutions for sustainable aquaculture
  • Effects on aquatic communities
  • New productions in aquaculture
  • Dissemination and community awareness.

Prof. Dr. Caterina Longo
Dr. Cataldo Pierri
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sustainable aquaculture
  • Bioremediation
  • Zooremediation
  • Integrated multitrophic aquaculture
  • Filter-feeder invertebrates
  • Rearing performance
  • Autochthonous communities

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
Valorization Use of Amphipod Meal, Gammarus pulex, as a Fishmeal Substitute on Growth Performance, Feed Utilization, Histological and Histometric Indices of the Gut, and Economic Revenue of Grey Mullet
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(12), 1336; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9121336 - 27 Nov 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 391
Abstract
The future of aquaculture development is directed toward high intensification to overcome the decline in natural fishing and to provide enough protein for the increasing world population. The spread of aquaculture production and intensification requires the search for high-quality, new efficient feed ingredients [...] Read more.
The future of aquaculture development is directed toward high intensification to overcome the decline in natural fishing and to provide enough protein for the increasing world population. The spread of aquaculture production and intensification requires the search for high-quality, new efficient feed ingredients with low cost and sustainable importance. Therefore, the current study aimed to detect the effects of partial or total replacement of fishmeal with amphipod meal, Gammarus pulex, on growth performance, survival percent, feed utilization, histological alteration of intestine and liver, and economic yield of grey mullet, Mugil cephalus, fry. Five diets were formulated to contain 100% fishmeal (FM), or FM replaced with 25%, 50%, 75%, or 100% amphipod meal (APM) (D0, D25, D50, D75, and D100, respectively). A total of 300 grey mullet fry (0.097 ± 0.001 g), were divided into five groups (three replicates each) at an initial stocking density of 20 fry per aquaria (100 L). The aquarium’s water is renewed at a rate of 30% daily. During a 60-day experimental period, the feeding rate was 20% of body weight, which was introduced as five meals per day. Fish fed D50 achieved the highest significant values of final weight (1.80 g), weight gain (1.70 g), survival (86.67%), final length (4.47 cm), and length gain (2.06 cm). In addition, the feed utilization of diets containing increasing substitution levels of FM showed that the highest protein intake (0.82 g ish−1), protein efficiency ratio (0.83), protein productive value (30.65%), and the lowest significant feed conversion ratio (1.21) were recorded with D50. The dose-response study revealed that the best substitution levels could range between 50% and 75%. Histological observations confirmed that the highest number of goblet cells and intestinal villi were recorded in the group fed D50. No pathological effect was observed in the liver at all substitution levels. In terms of economic efficiency, the best economic conversion ratio was recorded in the group fed D50. This study confirmed that 50% partial substitution of FM with APM is the ideal replacement level for grey mullet fry. In addition, the use of a new renewable alternative, such as APM to substitute FM, could relieve the pressure on the capture of wild fish and reduce the environmental impact of inland aquaculture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Perspectives in Sustainable Aquaculture)
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Article
Gonadal Development of Females of the White Shrimp Penaeus schmitti (Burkenroad, 1936) Caught in Southeastern Brazil
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(6), 653; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9060653 - 13 Jun 2021
Viewed by 796
Abstract
This study describes the reproductive cell development and ovarian developmental stages, and identifies the nongerminal components of white shrimp (Penaeus schmitti) caught off the southern coast of Espírito Santo, Brazil. P. schmitti specimens were collected monthly from March 2019 to February [...] Read more.
This study describes the reproductive cell development and ovarian developmental stages, and identifies the nongerminal components of white shrimp (Penaeus schmitti) caught off the southern coast of Espírito Santo, Brazil. P. schmitti specimens were collected monthly from March 2019 to February 2020, by artisanal fishing. All shrimps were analyzed macroscopically (n = 181) and females were randomly selected monthly (n = 154) for ovarian histological analysis. The ovaries were extracted for visual analysis and then submitted to histological analysis. Macroscopic analysis determined five stages of gonadal development from the color and turgidity of the fresh ovary. Histological observations allowed us to observe five stages of gonadal development: immature, initial development, advanced development, mature and spawning. This information are fundamental for understanding the reproductive aspects of P. schmitti, as well as other penaeid shrimps, in order to promote preservation of natural stocks and provide information to assist in the development of the reproductive potential of native species in captivity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Perspectives in Sustainable Aquaculture)
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Article
Filtering Activity and Nutrient Release by the Keratose Sponge Sarcotragus spinosulus Schmidt, 1862 (Porifera, Demospongiae) at the Laboratory Scale
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(2), 178; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9020178 - 10 Feb 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1272
Abstract
Sponges are an important constituent of filter-feeder benthic communities, characterized by high ecological plasticity and abundance. Free bacteria constitute an important quota of their diet, making them excellent candidates in aquaculture microbial bioremediation, where bacteria can be a serious problem. Although there are [...] Read more.
Sponges are an important constituent of filter-feeder benthic communities, characterized by high ecological plasticity and abundance. Free bacteria constitute an important quota of their diet, making them excellent candidates in aquaculture microbial bioremediation, where bacteria can be a serious problem. Although there are studies on this topic, certain promising species are still under investigation. Here we report applied microbiological research on the filtering activity of Sarcotragus spinosulus on two different concentrations of the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio parahaemolyticus in a laboratory experiment. To evaluate the effects of the filtration on the surrounding nutrient load, the release of ammonium, nitrate, and phosphate was also measured. The results obtained showed the efficient filtration capability of S. spinosulus as able to reduce the Vibrio load with a maximum retention efficiency of 99.72% and 99.35% at higher and lower Vibrio concentrations, respectively, and remarkable values of clearance rates (average maximum value 45.0 ± 4.1 mL h−1 g DW−1) at the highest Vibrio concentration tested. The nutrient release measured showed low values for each considered nutrient category at less than 1 mg L−1 for ammonium and phosphate and less than 5 mg L−1 for nitrate. The filtering activity and nutrient release by S. spinosulus suggest that this species represents a promising candidate in microbial bioremediation, showing an efficient capability in removing V. parahaemolyticus from seawater with a contribution to the nutrient load. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Perspectives in Sustainable Aquaculture)
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Article
Evaluation of the Effects of the Enriched-Organic Diets Composition on European Sea Bass Welfare through a Multi-Parametric Approach
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(11), 934; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8110934 - 17 Nov 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 759
Abstract
Three groups of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) were fed for seven months, with either a conventional diet or two different organic diets, which contain organic vegetables and a natural antioxidant compound. The two organic diets differed themselves in terms of [...] Read more.
Three groups of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) were fed for seven months, with either a conventional diet or two different organic diets, which contain organic vegetables and a natural antioxidant compound. The two organic diets differed themselves in terms of raw proteins, fish oil, and lipid contents. Sea bass welfare condition was assessed in relation to these three diets, using 16 different indicators. These were: swimming activity (recovery test, muscle activity), haematological and serological stress indicators (haematocrit, haemoglobin, red-blood-cell count, cortisol, glucose, lactate), aspecific immunity parameter (lysozyme), indicators of exposure to organic contaminants (7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase and glutathione-S-transferase), and growth parameters (weight gain, specific growth rate, feed conversion ratio, protein efficiency ratio, and hepato-somatic index). Most of these parameters individually did not give consistent responses, but their integration can provide an accurate evaluation of the fish welfare conditions among the three diet experimental groups. The multiparametric approach outlined a comprehensive picture of sea bass physiological state. The principal component analysis and the multi-criteria-decision-analysis were found to be useful tools for an integrated fish welfare assessment, highlighting that the best welfare condition was achieved in the experimental group fed with the protein-rich organic diet. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Perspectives in Sustainable Aquaculture)
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Article
An Innovative IMTA System: Polychaetes, Sponges and Macroalgae Co-Cultured in a Southern Italian In-Shore Mariculture Plant (Ionian Sea)
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(10), 733; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8100733 - 23 Sep 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 922
Abstract
In this paper, we report data from the first year of rearing of a set of filter feeder bioremediator organisms: macrobenthic invertebrates (sabellid polychaetes and sponges), coupled with macroalgae, realized in a mariculture fish farm. This innovative integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA) system was [...] Read more.
In this paper, we report data from the first year of rearing of a set of filter feeder bioremediator organisms: macrobenthic invertebrates (sabellid polychaetes and sponges), coupled with macroalgae, realized in a mariculture fish farm. This innovative integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA) system was realized at a preindustrial level in the Gulf of Taranto (southern Italy, northern Ionian Sea), within the framework of the EU Remedia Life project. Long lines containing different collector typologies were placed around the fish breeding cages. Vertical collectors were utilized for both polychaetes and sponges, whilst macroalgae were cultivated in horizontal collectors. Data on the growth and mortality of the target species after the first year of rearing and cultivation are given together with their biomass estimation. Polychaete biomass was obtained from natural settlement on ropes previously hung in the system, while sponges and macroalgae were derived from explants and/or inocules inserted in the collectors. The description of the successional pattern occurring on collectors used for settling until reaching a “stable” point is also described, with indications of additional filter feeder macroinvertebrates other than polychaetes and sponges that are easily obtainable and useful in the system as bioremediators as well. The results demonstrate an easy, natural obtaining of large biomass of sabellid polychaetes settling especially from about a 4 to 10 m depth. Sponges and macroalgae need to be periodically cleaned from the fouling covering. The macroalgae cycle was different from that of invertebrates and requires the cultivation of two different species with about a 6-month cycle for each one. The present study represents one of the first attempts at IMTA in the Mediterranean area where invertebrates and macroalgae are co-cultured in an inshore fish farm. Possible utilization of the produced biomass is also suggested. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Perspectives in Sustainable Aquaculture)
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