Special Issue "Observation, Analysis, and Modeling of Nearshore Dynamics"

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Coastal Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 April 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Yoshimitsu Tajima
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Grad. School of Eng., University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
Interests: nearshore hydrodynamics; sediment transport; numerical modeling; nearshore monitoring
Prof. Magnus Larson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Water Resources Engineering, Lund University, Lund, Sweden
Interests: nearshore hydrodynamics; sediment transport; coastal morphology; mathematical modeling
Prof. Yoshiaki Kuriyama
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Research and Development Agency, Kanagawa, Japan
Grad. School of Eng., The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
Tel. +81-46-844-5008
Interests: coastal engineering; nearshore dynamics; coastal processes
Dr. Takenori Shimozono
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Grad. School of Eng., University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan
Interests: nearshore dynamics; coastal geomorphology; coastal structures

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Understanding the characteristics of nearshore dynamics and coastal processes is one of the essential tasks for sustainable coastal development, conservation, and protection. The coast exhibits varying dynamic characteristics over a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. Wind waves, for example, can determine instantaneous sediment transport and cause short-term cross-shore morphology change, while nearshore currents induced by waves and tides may determine long-term and large-scale morphology change, causing chronic coastal erosion. Such nearshore dynamics at different spatiotemporal scales typically interact with each other and are also affected by other factors such as human activities and climate change. Observation, analysis, and modeling of nearshore dynamics are, thus, inevitable not only for establishing the present conditions of the coast, but also for the evaluation and projection of the future evolution under the impact of a wide range of factors. This Special Issue, therefore, focuses on, but is not limited to the following:

  • Observations, analysis, and modeling of nearshore hydrodynamics
  • Observations, analysis, and modeling of nearshore sediment transport, including aeolian transport
  • Observations, analysis, and modeling of long-term and/or short-term nearshore morphology change
  • Development of monitoring techniques for nearshore dynamics at various spatiotemporal scales

We look forward to contributions of exciting new research in the form of research papers, reviews, and short communications to this Special Issue.

Prof. Yoshimitsu Tajima
Prof. Magnus Larson
Prof. Yoshiaki Kuriyama
Dr. Takenori Shimozono
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nearshore dynamics
  • nearshore monitoring
  • nearshore waves and currents
  • sediment transport
  • coastal processes
  • mathematical and numerical modeling

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Using Video Monitoring to Test a Fetch-Based Aeolian Sand Transport Model
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(2), 110; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8020110 - 12 Feb 2020
Abstract
Transport of beach sand to the foredune by wind is essential for dunes to grow. The aeolian sand transport rate is related to wind velocity, but wind-based models often overpredict this transport for narrow beaches (<100 m). To better predict aeolian sand transport, [...] Read more.
Transport of beach sand to the foredune by wind is essential for dunes to grow. The aeolian sand transport rate is related to wind velocity, but wind-based models often overpredict this transport for narrow beaches (<100 m). To better predict aeolian sand transport, the fetch-based Aeolus model was developed. Here, we qualitatively test this model by comparing its transport-rate output to visual signs of aeolian transport on video imagery collected at Egmond aan Zee, the Netherlands, during a six-month winter period. The Aeolus model and the Argus images often agree on the timing of aeolian transport days, except when transport is small; that is not always visible on the Argus images. Consistent with the imagery (minimal signs of aeolian activity in strong winds), the Aeolus model sometimes predicts the actual transport to be smaller than the potential transport. This difference is largest when wind velocity is large, and its direction is cross-shore. Although transport limitations are not predicted to be common, the results suggest that their effect on the total transport in the study period was substantial. This indicates that the fetch distance should be taken into account when calculating aeolian transport for narrow beaches on longer timescales (>weeks). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Observation, Analysis, and Modeling of Nearshore Dynamics)
Open AccessArticle
Circulation in the Gulf of Khambhat—A Lagrangian Perspective
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(1), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8010025 - 06 Jan 2020
Abstract
The circulation of the Gulf of Khambhat (GoK) is studied from a Lagrangian point of view using a 2D numerical model. The model-predicted tide elevation and current speed are in agreement with the observations. Seasonal variations of advection of particles are simulated by [...] Read more.
The circulation of the Gulf of Khambhat (GoK) is studied from a Lagrangian point of view using a 2D numerical model. The model-predicted tide elevation and current speed are in agreement with the observations. Seasonal variations of advection of particles are simulated by releasing 237 particles homogeneously distributed over the Gulf. After one month of simulation, no particles escaped from the GoK except a few from the southern GoK during southwest monsoon (June–September), and the advection of particles was at its maximum in the northern part. Residual eddies are present inside the GoK during the northeast (October–January) and southwest monsoon seasons. Gulf circulation is studied with the combined forcing of tide and wind for different tidal conditions, which had noticeable seasonal difference. The maximum simulated current speeds of 3.4 and 2.8 m/s are noticed during southwest monsoon near to Bhavnagar and Dahej respectively, where the tide elevations are maximum indicating that GoK is a tide-dominated system. A seasonal barrier could be found in the southern Gulf, which not only makes the Gulf circulation distinct from that of the Arabian Sea (AS), but also restricts water-mass exchange between the Gulf and AS during ebb condition. As the Gulf is a dump yard for anthropogenic wastes, the present study puts forward an effort to determine the fate of the waste from a hydrodynamic point of view. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Observation, Analysis, and Modeling of Nearshore Dynamics)
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Open AccessArticle
Nearshore Dynamics of Storm Surges and Waves Induced by the 2018 Typhoons Jebi and Trami Based on the Analysis of Video Footage Recorded on the Coasts of Wakayama, Japan
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2019, 7(11), 413; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse7110413 - 13 Nov 2019
Abstract
In this study, field surveys along the coasts of Wakayama Prefecture, Japan, were first conducted to investigate the coastal damage due to storm surges and storm-induced waves caused by the 2018 Typhoons Jebi and Trami. Special focus was placed on the characteristic behavior [...] Read more.
In this study, field surveys along the coasts of Wakayama Prefecture, Japan, were first conducted to investigate the coastal damage due to storm surges and storm-induced waves caused by the 2018 Typhoons Jebi and Trami. Special focus was placed on the characteristic behavior of nearshore waves through investigation of observed data, numerical simulations, and image analysis of video footage recorded on the coasts. The survey results indicated that inundation, wave overtopping, and drift debris caused by violent storm-induced waves were the dominant factors causing coastal damage. Results of numerical simulations showed that heights of storm-induced waves were predominantly greater than storm surge heights along the entire coast of Wakayama in both typhoons. However, computed gradual alongshore variations in wave and surge heights did not explain locally-concentrated inundation and run-up heights observed along the coasts. These results indicate that complex nearshore hydrodynamics induced by local nearshore bathymetry might have played a significant role in inducing such local wave characteristics and the associated coastal damage. Analysis of video footage recorded during Typhoon Jebi, for example, clearly showed evidence of amplified infragravity wave components, which could enhance inundation and wave run-up. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Observation, Analysis, and Modeling of Nearshore Dynamics)
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