Special Issue "Marine Metrology and Oceanographic Measurements: Procedures for Ocean Observing Systems, Data Management, and Services"

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Ocean Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Paola Picco
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Italian Hydrographic Service, passo dell’Osservatorio, 4, 16135 Genova, Italy
Interests: physical oceanography; air–sea interaction; oceanographic measurements; time-series analysis
Dr. Francesca Rolle
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRiM), National Institute of Metrological Research, Italy
Interests: metrology in chemistry and environmental pollutants; development of analytical methods for the quantification of gaseous atmospheric pollutants and organic micropollutants
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

“Measuring the oceans” is the basis for the understanding of any oceanographic process and to improve prediction capabilities. However, the efforts to collect the data are worthless if good quality and metrological traceability are not assured.

This Special Issue welcomes papers dealing with new developments in the fields of oceanographic observations, from sensors to data management.

Improvements on observation platforms and measuring devices and sensors, calibration techniques for in situ and remote-sensed measurements, definition of reference standards and sampling handling guidelines, as well as results from intercomparison exercises are of great interest.

 Papers addressing methodologies for harmonizing and blending data collected from a wide variety of sensors and platforms and those obtained from numerical models, the definition and test of metrics for the assessment of ocean model performances, and new tools for data presentation and dissemination are also welcomed.

This Special Issue hosts selected papers from the “2019 IMEKO TC-19 International Workshop on Metrology for the Sea”, but it is open to any other contributions.

Prof. Paola Picco
Dr. Francesca Rolle
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • data harmonization techniques
  • EOV (essential ocean variables)
  • innovative platforms and device for at sea measurements
  • intercomparison exercises
  • metrological comparability
  • quality assurance algorithms
  • reference standards

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
A Comparison between Coastal Altimetry Data and Tidal Gauge Measurements in the Gulf of Genoa (NW Mediterranean Sea)
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(11), 862; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8110862 - 30 Oct 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 512
Abstract
Satellite altimetry data from X-TRACK products were analyzed for an overall assessment of their capability to detect coastal sea level variability in the Ligurian Sea. Near-coastal altimetry data, collected from 2009 to 2016 along track n.044, were compared with simultaneous high frequency sampled [...] Read more.
Satellite altimetry data from X-TRACK products were analyzed for an overall assessment of their capability to detect coastal sea level variability in the Ligurian Sea. Near-coastal altimetry data, collected from 2009 to 2016 along track n.044, were compared with simultaneous high frequency sampled data at the tidal station in Genoa (NW Mediterranean Sea). The two time series show a very good agreement: correlation between total sea level elevation from the altimeter and sea level variation from the tidal gauge is 0.92 and root mean square difference is 4.5 cm. Some relevant mismatches can be ascribed to the local high frequency coastal variability due to shelf and harbor oscillation detected at the tidal station, which might not be observed at the location of the altimetry points of measurement. The analysis evidences discrepancies (root mean square difference of 4.7 cm) between model results for open sea tides and harmonic analysis at the tidal station, mainly occurring at the annual and semiannual period. On the contrary, the important part of dynamic atmospheric correction due to the inverse barometer effect, well agrees with that computed at the tidal station. Full article
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Article
An Object Model for Seafloor Observatory Sensor Control in the East China Sea
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(9), 716; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8090716 - 16 Sep 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 659
Abstract
Seafloor observatories enable long-term, real-time, and continuous observation that marks a new way for oceanographic measurements. In terms of seafloor observatory research, sensor control is a key issue for the stable and effective operations of functional observatories. In this paper, an object model [...] Read more.
Seafloor observatories enable long-term, real-time, and continuous observation that marks a new way for oceanographic measurements. In terms of seafloor observatory research, sensor control is a key issue for the stable and effective operations of functional observatories. In this paper, an object model is proposed to standardize seafloor observatory sensor control and data acquisition. The object model is conceptionally designed as a set of sensor resource objects, based on the attributes and operations of which a client–server sensor control architecture is enabled for bidirectional information flow of control commands and observation data. The object model-based architecture is implemented with a prototype control system for plug-and-play enablement. The prototype system was put into a series of tests before applied to the East China Sea Experimental Seafloor Observatory, performing consistently with all the project requirements. Given the successful experiment, the object model design and prototype implementation are feasible to resolve seafloor observatory sensor control and beneficial for ocean observatory sciences. Full article
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Article
XBT, ARGO Float and Ship-Based CTD Profiles Intercompared under Strict Space-Time Conditions in the Mediterranean Sea: Assessment of Metrological Comparability
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2020, 8(5), 313; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse8050313 - 29 Apr 2020
Viewed by 838
Abstract
Accurate measurement of temperature and salinity is a fundamental task with heavy implications in all the possible applications of the currently available datasets, for example, in the study of climate changes and modeling of ocean dynamics. In this work, the reliability of measurements [...] Read more.
Accurate measurement of temperature and salinity is a fundamental task with heavy implications in all the possible applications of the currently available datasets, for example, in the study of climate changes and modeling of ocean dynamics. In this work, the reliability of measurements obtained by oceanographic devices (eXpendable BathyThermographs, Argo floats and Conductivity-Temperature-Depth sensors) is analyzed by means of an intercomparison exercise. As a first step, temperature profiles from XBT probes, deployed by commercial ships crossing the Ligurian and Tyrrhenian seas during the Ship of Opportunity Program (SOOP), were matched with profiles from Argo floats quasi-collocated in space and time. Attention was then paid to temperature/salinity profiling Argo floats. Since Argo floats usually are not recovered and should last up to five years without any re-calibration, their onboard sensors may suffer some drift and/or offset. In the literature, refined methods were developed to post-process Argo data, in order to correct the response of their profiling CTD sensors, in particular adjusting the salinity drift. The core of this delayed-mode quality control is the comparison of Argo data with reference climatology. At the same time, the experimental comparison of Argo profiles with ship-based CTD profiles, matched in space and time, is still of great importance. Therefore, an overall comparison of Argo floats vs. shipboard CTDs was performed, in terms of temperature and salinity profiles in the whole Mediterranean Sea, under space-time matching conditions as strict as possible. Performed analyses provided interesting results. XBT profiles confirmed that below 100 m depth the accordance with Argo data is reasonably good, with a small positive bias (close to 0.05 °C) and a standard deviation equal to about 0.10 °C. Similarly, side-by-side comparisons vs. CTD profiles confirmed the good quality of Argo measurements; the evidence of a drift in time was found, but at a level of about E−05 unit/day, so being reasonably negligible on the Argo time-scale. XBT, Argo and CTD users are therefore encouraged to take into account these results as a good indicator of the uncertainties associated with such devices in the Mediterranean Sea, for the analyzed period, in all the climatological applications. Full article
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